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Who Deserves to Be on Money, But Isn't

 
 
Reply Wed 21 Jan, 2004 04:06 pm
Some that come to mind would be:

1. Henry Knox
His claim has to be as good as Hamilton's, since he was a Revolutionary War general, and the first secretary of War.
2. John Hancock
He was, in a sense, the first president, since he was the president of the continental congress. He was also the first and a nine time governor of Massachusetts, and used his own personal fortune to finance the minutemen, and, of course, was the first signer of the Declaration (for which a warrant was issued for his arrest and execution). Also, a great philanthropist, with many charitable enterprises.
3. Thomas Edison
Maybe a scholar of some kind should get a chance. Just a thought. Edison is no less credible a candidate than Sacajawea.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 6 • Views: 7,426 • Replies: 25
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 07:04 am
Hey, brandon. Susan B.Anthony didn't do so well, did she. Quite frankly, I think we tax payers ought to be on money.

As for John Hancock, his handwriting was too ostentatious. Smile
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PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 07:23 am
I like Brandon's list anyway.

To it I might add Theodore Roosevelt, Martin Luther King Jr., and Margaret Sanger, the woman who founded Planned Parenthood (that ought to stir things up a bit :wink: ).
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Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 09:00 am
Teddy Roosevelt and MLK do deserve it. Franklin is already on the dime, but that shouldn't affect Teddy's chances. MLK is a bit recent, but, then again, so is Kennedy, and he's on some 50 cent pieces.

By the way, I did not mean to imply in my post that Sacajawea didn't deserve the honor, because I think she does. Interestingly, as I recall, the details of the remainder of her life are uncertain - there are two stories - either she died almost immediately after Lewis and Clark, or else she lived to be quite old. I really should have mentioned John Adams, too, whose service to this country absolutely qualifies him. Also, I wonder if it is automatically impossible for a non-American to be on American money, because I think that the Marquis de Lafayette deserves the honor.
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PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 09:52 am
I believe John Adams used to be on currency; one of the $X,000 dollar bills, none of which is printed any more.

I Googled but but didn't find confirmation. Must move on to the world off-line for now, so if someone else has the time and Google-inclination...
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PDiddie
 
  2  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 09:57 am
I did find this of interest (to those who wish to pose or answer correctly a trivia question):

http://www.frbsf.org/currency/metal/silvercerts/1107fr3.jpg

Silver Certificate, $5, 1899
The portrait shows the likeness of one of only two Native Americans on United States currency. Chief Running Antelope, from the Sioux tribe, was depicted wearing a headdress from the Pawnee tribe. This created ill will among the Sioux and Pawnee nations.


and this:

http://www.frbsf.org/currency/metal/silvercerts/566fr3.jpg

Silver Certificate, $1, 1886
This note features the portrait of Martha Washington, the only woman to have her portrait on American currency. The only other woman depicted on American currency was the Indian Pocahontas, who appears as part of a historical scene.
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mac11
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 09:57 am
Have fun at the golf course, PDiddie!

I googled and found Grover Cleveland on $1000, James Madison on the $5000, and someone named Chase (like the bank?) on the $10,000.
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Sugar
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 09:59 am
I have a $1 Silver Certificate from 1886. Wonder if it's worth anything more than $1.
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mac11
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 10:00 am
Ah, here's more about Mr. Chase:

Quote:
Salmon P. Chase was the 25th Secretary of the Treasury, serving under Lincoln. Due to a monetary crisis brought on by the Civil War, he reluctantly implemented the first printing of paper money in the United States.

In fact, Chase's portrait appeared on the original $1 bill, thus earning him the nickname "Old Mr. Greenbacks." The name didn't stick, however, due to the fact that after the war, Chase, then Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, declared paper currency to be unconstitutional.
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blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 10:00 am
J. Edgar Hoover...three dollar bill?
mac11
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 10:02 am
Bureau of Engraving & Printing website
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 11:31 am
With regard to Sacajawea, she was "married" to one of the French Canadian coureur du bois who acted as guides for the expedition. She gave birth to a child, whom the members of the expedition named "Pomp" (short for Pompey). She subsequently gave birth to two other children, and these children were given into the care of William Clark, who resided in St. Louis after the return of the expedition.

When Lewis travelled through Kentucky on his way to Illinois, where the "Corps of Discovery" spent the first winter, before starting their journey, he selected several promising young men to be non-commissioned officers in what was officially a military expedition. He required that they be literate, and able to demonstrate as much. They were given paper, pen and ink, and required to keep journals of their own.

One of the most interesting accounts of the expedition which i have ever read is Lewis and Clark, Pioneering Naturalists. It draws heavily upon the many journals which were kept, and, short of actually tracking down and reading copies of those journals themselves, one of the best narrative sources i've seen.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 11:36 am
Setanta, I do wish that you would have been available when I taught Humanities. You would have been a marvelous resource person.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 11:38 am
Would i have been obliged to sit quietly in a corner, awaiting the call to duty?
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 11:44 am
You? Sit quietly? Nah! You'd be puttin' your money where your mouth is..hee hee.(just said that to keep us on topic)
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  2  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 11:44 am
We should have monkeys on our currency, like Brazil:

http://www.oanda.com/images/fxgallery/currency_images/20030430183514BR250.png

or Madagascar:

http://www.oanda.com/images/fxgallery/currency_images/20030507161145MGF.5000.png

Maybe it would look something like this:

http://prosites-lottofun9.homestead.com/files/gb200frnt.jpg
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Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 12:20 pm
Setanta wrote:
One of the most interesting accounts of the expedition which i have ever read is Lewis and Clark, Pioneering Naturalists. It draws heavily upon the many journals which were kept, and, short of actually tracking down and reading copies of those journals themselves, one of the best narrative sources i've seen.

Thanks. It's now on my list of books to read.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 12:31 pm
Now i'm a little embarrassed . . . better go get a precise citation for you . . .
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 12:32 pm
Lewis and Clark, Pioneering Naturalists (Second Edition)

By Paul Russell Cutright With an introduction by Paul A. Johnsgard


Paper: 2003, xxiii, 522, CIP.LC 2002034967
ISBN : 0-8032-6434-8
University of Nebraska Press
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 12:51 pm
Thx, Setanta.
0 Replies
 
 

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