17
   

A QUESTION ABOUT QUESTIONABLE ADVERTISING

 
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2011 03:34 pm
@Linkat,
Maybe once or twice, I did consider buying from the Long John Shirt Co. Embarrassed
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2011 03:39 pm
@chai2,
You would have been eating them up like ---- candy
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2011 03:42 pm
@Eva,
Eva wrote:

A great deal of advertising is done to establish/reinforce image and name recognition, which only secondarily lead to sales.

Instead of asking whether an ad makes you want to buy the product, ask yourself if the ad left you with a good impression of the brand. If it did, you are more likely to choose that brand when faced with a buying decision.


Well actually, when I see ads that don't address what the product is, what good it will do me, I'm not left with a favorable impression.

Take those 3 condom ads. The 2nd didn't leave me with a favorable impression. The 3rd one was very funny, I guess you could say I was favorable of the commercial, but it didn't even make me think of condoms first. Well, it did, but in the fact you can make them into balloon animals. Even though they were having sex, I myself wasn't thinking about sex watching it.

The first one though....THIS is what happens without using condoms.
THAT was ALL I needed to know.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2011 04:59 pm
The Energizer Bunny was cute, but how many people remember exactly which battery he was repping for?
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2011 05:20 pm
@roger,
Quote:
The Energizer Bunny was cute, but how many people remember exactly which battery he was repping for?


I'll wager that it was the market leader in battery sales.

We studied this sort of stuff in a marketing class I took. Some companies are so synonymous with their product that they don't have to advertise by name. "Soup is good food" was Campbell's soup tag line for year, not "Campbell's soup is good food". They knew that you were most likely to pick Campbell's if you went to buy soup. Morton's salt and French's mustard are two companies that only really advertise with coupons anymore because they know that if you need that product you'll most likely buy theirs with or without a coupon.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2011 06:30 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

The Energizer Bunny was cute, but how many people remember exactly which battery he was repping for?


Wait, is this a trick question? Wink
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2011 06:32 pm
@chai2,
Reminds me of that cheech and chong skit, "Let's Make a Dope Deal"

Our first contestant is Bob from Vancouver.
Bob, here's your first question for tonight....ready Bob?

What's your first name?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2011 07:24 pm
Ok, ok, you tards, here's about Vance Packard and the Hidden Persuaders.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vance_Packard

Agree with him or scoff, part of the history..

0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 12:58 am
Sad to say, but the most effective ads are the most annoying or simplistic.

I can understand why Corporae Execs who are planning on spending millions for an ad campaign want artistic or funny, but, by and large, I can never remember the products featured in my favorite ads.

Charmin was a great example when they had that utter idiot Mr Whipple squeezing the Charmin. He actually may have been so annoying as to put off potential consumers, but everyone knew the brand.

It's ironic but some of the most affective ads in terms of name recognition are produced for the lowest price and feature an inane jingle.

Geico has ads that are not only funny but effective, but I think that is due as much to the saturation level for which they strive, as the creativity of their campaigns. You'll note they have at least three running at any given time.

The ultimate goal of an ad is to imbed a product name in your brain. If it can be done in a largely postive way, that's a home run.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 02:16 am
@roger,
roger wrote:
For myself, it's not exactly the sexual inference that's the turn off. It's more the implication that I, the viewer, am so shallow that I'm going to run out and buy something promoted with a partially naked broad


Amen
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 07:22 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

roger wrote:
For myself, it's not exactly the sexual inference that's the turn off. It's more the implication that I, the viewer, am so shallow that I'm going to run out and buy something promoted with a partially naked broad


Amen


At my age, I may buy the product merely out of gratitude. I don't get to see naked broads as often anymore.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 10:24 am
@wandeljw,
TMI, Boss . . .
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2011 06:27 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Annoying - number one - the song for "Cars for Kids" that damnn song sticks in my head because I detest it so much! But I certainly know what they are advertising.
0 Replies
 
 

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