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Low Calories Vs. Nutritional Balance

 
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 12:56 pm
@ehBeth,
no. the time line was not literally short weeks.
it FELT like short weeks, felt like nothing at all honestly. But it was from june to about.. sept/oct.
I didnt count actual days and time after about the first 2 weeks. I just kept going. I bet if I go back in my email and fb history, I might be able to narrow it down a bit more , but I did not mean statement literally. Gracious no. That would be a sickness, not a weight loss.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 01:02 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
And all kinds of other good systemic stuff (heart, lungs, even brain.)
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 01:02 pm
@shewolfnm,
shewolfnm wrote:
The BMI was constructed as a scan for a group, city or area of people determining food supply, effects on foods and general health. It is used as an over view for MANY people.. not at all intended, calculated or meant for the individual body.

That's a good point point, even though the BMI works well enough for us average-muscled people. For example, if you still look like you did when I last saw you in New York (you looked great by the way) I'm pretty sure your BMI is happy with you. (And vice versa.)

That said, there are several ways to measure the actual body-fat percentage.
  • Some involve measuring ones circumference at various stages. That costs nothing, but it's fairly unprecise.

  • Then there are callipers, which you use to tweak your skin with a defined force and to measure the thickness of the skinfold. You do this at three different places of your body, perform some tedious table-lookups, and out pops your body fat percentage. These callipers cost around ten bucks. (That's what I use for the occasional cross check.) There are also electronic variants that automatically do the measuring and that run the table-lookup for you. They cost several dozen bucks.

  • My gym has another electronic variant that determines measures your body's resistance to Alternating Current at various frequencies. These are also several dozen bucks.

  • At the high end, there are tests that either weigh your body under water (several 100 bucks, or that run an MRI on you to measure the precise volume of fat. Those are in the multiple-kilobuck range, and may not be worth it for you.

Aren't you glad you asked? Oh, you didn't? Well . . .
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 01:10 pm
@shewolfnm,
shewolfnm wrote:
But it was from june to about.. sept/oct.


still way too short a period of time to be healthy
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 01:13 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
I'm at the beginning (again) of the same process littlek is (no, not entering menopause for the second time - saints protect Setanta). I've been told that the best approach is to do both - increase caloric output by 250 - 500 calories a day AND decrease caloric intake by 250 - 500 calories a day - with the emphasis on increasing output, but with both to be factors.

We'll see. It feels good so far.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 01:36 pm
@CalamityJane,
Yes, I suppose that's categorically true but, from my reading, I've gotten less interested over the years in dieting as any kind of weighty salvation. In particular, I think continuous off and on weight gain and weight loss is more destructive than being a constant dozen pounds above the published overweight line. I've read pros and cons on that.

Food - cuisines, yes! but also ordinary old food - is one of my greatest pleasures, hope it is for others, know it isn't for some. An a2k poster who doesn't post anymore said he would like it if all his meals could be in some small package. I'm paraphrasing, but he was without the foodie gene. I believed him. For him and others like him, food = function. It reminded me of an old cartoon that stuck in my memory, some guy at a dinner table staring down at his plate with one compacted pellet on it. But, we are all different, which adds interest.

What I've found myself is that what I think is delicious has changed because of my food adventures, especially asian foods, and it's changed towards much healthier fare that I now think tastes as wonderful as I once thought a Lawry's prime rib at the original restaurant did (which shows how old I am.) Now one of those meals would feed me for a week or two, hyperbole, but I'm sure I couldn't make it all the way through the average prime rib dinner of the sixties now (gross).

So, while I frown about diets for those not much 'overweight', I can see changing food interests - keeping the pleasure and eating better as one process.

We have several a2kers who have lost a lot of weight through differing regimes, and while they have a variety of struggles, they are mostly keeping it off. With that kind of weight loss, I can see the benefits of what-kind-of-carb attention, protein, amounts of different fats, salts, vitamins, minerals, and so on. Counting calories in, calories used, has always seemed non specific to me, while I guess it's useful as a generality.

Jjorge et al, sorry for saying you're nuts (pecans? filberts?)
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 02:30 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:
Or increase caloric output. Which is by FAR the best way to go - not only do you lose weight, you tone and strengthen your muscles.
Cycloptichorn


Definitely! I never would have believed that one day I cannot do without
exercising. More than anything, it's a great stress relief for me and I don't
feel well without exercising.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 02:32 pm
@ossobuco,
Yes, osso, you do what works for you and makes you happy and stay healthy.
Everyone is at a different stage in life though and entering menopause is difficult on so many levels, weight gain being one of it. While we can do very little to stop menopause, weight gain can be controlled, at least by the ones who choose to do so.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 02:38 pm
Anyway, littlek, I don't know what online source you use to count your
calories and nutrient intake, but I found this site to be very complete
http://www.myfitnesspal.com/
If you have a smartphone you can add it as an app on your phone. You even can scan bar codes and the product is automatically added which is great
when you eat on the run. Food from places like Panera Breads can be entered with a bar code. It will tell you how many calories you've left per day and give you a report of nutrients you've consumed.

You can even link your account to your co-workers or friends to monitor
each other. Some of my co-workers have it and if one eats to much the others come running....

www.myfitnesspal.com is a great app to keep track of your food intake.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 03:23 pm
@CalamityJane,
I won't argue with that, and I quit smoking just pre menopause - read fat gain and also had a bleeding fibroid that decimated my iron stores, approaching zero. (Snort, my first trip to Italy, bleeding on the Corso surrounded by zingari in filmy swaths)

The question is how we control it, thus thousands of books, articles, and twits out there.

I'm more for food interest change than for calorie counting, understand disagreeing with me. I don't think people making choices fit into bad good columns.

0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 03:44 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

I'm at the beginning (again) of the same process littlek is (no, not entering menopause for the second time - saints protect Setanta). I've been told that the best approach is to do both - increase caloric output by 250 - 500 calories a day AND decrease caloric intake by 250 - 500 calories a day - with the emphasis on increasing output, but with both to be factors.

We'll see. It feels good so far.


Over time, increased caloric output (done properly) leads to leaner and stronger muscles and healthier organs; but most importantly, it strengthens the metabolism. Once you get your regular workout going strong enough... you can REALLY relax the food requirements, and eat the stuff you like much more often.

Which is the real goal!!!

My Grandpa lived to be 93, he had a bowl of ice cream and smoked cigarettes every goddamn day. But he worked out a lot and was pretty fit.

Cycloptichorn
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 03:51 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:
Once you get your regular workout going strong enough... you can REALLY relax the food requirements, and eat the stuff you like much more often.


I don't think that's often the case for menopausal/post-menopausal women. Our metabolism goes whack a doodle with hormonal changes - and some foods can really set that off <cue the soy warning music>.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 03:57 pm
@ehBeth,
Wow, I thought Soy was what people ate BECAUSE they couldn't eat their favorite foods.

Well, learned something today, thanks. And big props to Jeebus, once again, for making me male.

Cycloptichorn
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 04:17 pm
@Cycloptichorn,


soy - side effects / webmd.com

Quote:
Special Precautions & Warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Soy protein is LIKELY SAFE in pregnancy and during breast-feeding when consumed in amounts normally found in food. Higher doses during pregnancy might harm development of the baby. Not enough is known about the safety of higher doses during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid larger doses.

Children: Soy is LIKELY SAFE for children when used in amounts commonly found in food or infant formula. Using soy formula does not seem to cause health or reproductive problems later in life. However, soymilk that is not designed for infants should not be used as a substitute for infant formula. Regular soymilk could lead to nutrient deficiencies.

Soy is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used as an alternative to cow’s milk in children who are allergic to cow’s milk. Although soy protein-based infant formulas are often promoted for children with milk allergy, these children are often allergic to soy as well.

Don’t give children soy in amounts larger than what is found in food or formula. Researchers don’t know whether soy is safe for children at higher doses.

Cystic fibrosis: Soymilk can interfere with the way children with cystic fibrosis process protein. Don’t give these children soy products.

Breast cancer: The effects of soy in people with breast cancer are unclear. Some research finds that soy might “feed” certain breast cancers because it can act like estrogen. Other studies have found that soy seems to protect against breast cancer. The difference in effects might have something to do with the amount taken. Because there isn’t enough reliable information about the effects of soy in women with breast cancer, a history of breast cancer, or a family history of breast cancer, it’s best to avoid using soy until more is known.

Endometrial cancer: Long-term use of concentrated soy isoflavone tablets might increase the occurrence of precancerous changes in the tissue lining the uterus. Don’t take concentrated soy isoflavone supplements if you have endometrial cancer.

Kidney disease: There is some concern that soy products might increase the risk of kidney stones because they contain large amounts of a group of chemicals called oxalates. Oxalates are the main ingredient in kidney stones. Another concern is that people with serious kidney disease aren’t able to process some of the chemicals in soy. This could lead to dangerously high levels of these chemicals. If you have kidney disease or a history of kidney stones, avoid taking large amounts of soy.

Urinary bladder cancer: Soy products might increase the chance of getting bladder cancer. Avoid soy foods if you have bladder cancer or a high risk of getting it (family history of bladder cancer).

Under-active thyroid (hypothyroidism): There is a concern that taking soy might make this condition worse.

Asthma: People with asthma are more likely to be allergic to soy hulls. Avoid using soy products.

Hay fever (allergic rhinitis): People with hay fever are more likely to be allergic to soy hulls.


same link
different page

Quote:
The active ingredients in soy are called isoflavones. A study of the quality of commercially available soy supplements suggests that less than 25% of products contain within 90% of labeled isoflavone content. Paying more for a product doesn’t necessarily guarantee that the content shown on the label is accurate.

How does it work?

Soy contains "isoflavones" which are changed in the body to "phytoestrogens," which are similar to the hormone estrogen.


It certainly seems safe for a number of people. For me, soy / tofu has had treat-only status for about 20 years.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 04:19 pm
@ehBeth,
Yep, totally whack. This being female thing does suck at times.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 04:35 pm
@ehBeth,
On breast cancer and soy, my surgeon (a famosa) said a lot of that data was about soy powder products (but that was quite a while ago so I don't know about now), but regard with reserve, a little once in a while was ok. I have tofu a couple of times a year and enjoy it when I do. I'll buy the silly soy pumpkin egg nog stuff once a year as a fling.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 04:40 pm
@ossobuco,
The research has come a long way - if you look at the side effects bit (more at the master link at webmd) - they split out soy protein/soy additives/soy hulls etc

I love love love ginger-lime toasted soy nuts. They've got hulls - they do cause allergy problems for me. A friend of mine had thyroid cancer, had her thyroid removed - she has to avoid soy as it interacts badly with Synthroid. We share a bag of the ginger-lime soy nuts as a treat once a year. I love tofu in so many dishes - because of family medical hx - my adored tofu dumplings are an annual treat.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 04:49 pm
@ehBeth,
One of my fave chinese dishes was stuffed tofu crispy on the outside..

Oh, never mind, I live in Abq now. Hummmmmmmmmmmmm.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 04:51 pm
@ehBeth,
Thanks re the new data.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 07:23 pm
Yikes, I Seem to have touched some nerves.....

When I started this thread, I wanted to put out some basic info. Obviously there is a lot more consideration going into this weight-loss dynamic than what I took the time to write about. But, reading responses has been interesting.

I understand that this website (caloriecount.com) is by anyone's standards inaccurate for a variety of reasons. I understand that BMI is just a guideline. I understand how body type and muscle mass has an effect on BMI. Mostly I started this thread because I couldn't figure out how to eat as much potassium as recommended and still eat any kind of normal caloric intake.

I have always known that my diet is very good. I was attempting to fine-tune it to make it better without having to spend $ on a visit with a nutritionist as well as to lose 10-15 pounds. Nothing drastic or nuts. My family has high cholesterol and heart issues and I am already headed in the same direction. Weight directly affects cholesterol and BP issues.
 

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