parados
 
  6  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 09:41 pm
@georgeob1,
In fact the Senate lawyer has this to say about the attempt to send the troopers to bring back the Dems..

Quote:
Troupis insisted the detention is not an arrest because the senators are not suspected of any crimes.
Wow.. So much for the illegality of their action. Even the Senate's lawyer admits there were no crimes.

http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_8d9ad090-45bd-11e0-bf68-001cc4c03286.html

But of course, how can police officers arrest someone if there is no legal justification? That would be kidnapping. Police officers are not under the jurisdiction of the Senate. They are supposed to uphold laws, not Senate resolutions. The Senate resolution has no legal power outside the Senate.
reasoning logic
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 09:50 pm
@parados,
In the USA it does not matter if a law was broken or not!
All you would have to do is issue a arrest warrant and if I am not mistaken the neighboring state would go after the people if they knew their location and return them home to you.

If you know people you can do what ever you want and get away with it to a high degree of abuse!
parados
 
  4  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 10:16 pm
@reasoning logic,
No, it doesn't work that way at all.

Issuing an arrest warrant can not be done by the state Senate. An arrest without a crime would lead to a lawsuit that the police would lose without question.

States do NOT turn people over to neighboring states without proper paperwork and an extradition proceeding.
Quote:
In order for a person to be extradited interstate, 18 U.S.C. ยง 3182 requires:

* An executive authority demand of the jurisdiction to which a person that is a fugitive from justice has fled.
* The requesting executive must produce a copy of an indictment found or an affidavit made before a magistrate of any State or Territory, and
* Such document must charge the fugitive demanded with having committed treason, felony, or other crime, and
* Such document must be certified as authentic by the governor or chief magistrate of the state or territory from whence the person so charged has fled.
* The executive receiving the request must then cause the fugitive to be arrested and secured, and notify the requesting executive authority or agent to receive the fugitive.
* An agent of the executive of the State demanding extradition must appear to receive the prisoner, which must occur within thirty days from time of arrest or the prisoner may be released. (Some states allow longer waiting periods of up to 90 days before release).
* Cases of kidnapping by a parent to another state would be automatic involvement by the US Marshals department.


There would be no way to extradite from Illinois since there was no indictment and no judge as issued a warrant. There was no felony to charge them with so that is also not met. Governor Walker could have made up a document and certified it was accurate but that would probably be a Federal crime since there is no crime they could be charged with.


Quote:

If you know people you can do what ever you want and get away with it to a high degree of abuse!
Only if the abuse doesn't see the inside of a courtroom or the front page of a newspaper. If Walker and the WI Senate had tried to extradite the missing Senators they would have found themselves subject to an FBI investigation.
reasoning logic
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 10:27 pm
@parados,
Yes you are correct it is not the senate's job! And you are also correct that because they are senators that they would have gotten away with it but if you are a laymen in the state of Florida I do doubt that you would because we have a brother in law club with our neighboring states at least in my opinion!
parados
 
  4  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 10:34 pm
@reasoning logic,
Sorry, it doesn't work that way rl..

Anyone turned over from one state to another without consent of the person arrested of an extradition trial would have a basis for a Federal lawsuit as well as a good chance of his criminal trial being overturned for violations of the law by the police or other authority that turned them over without following the law.
reasoning logic
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 10:50 pm
@parados,
You do seem to be more informed than me and I hope that you are correct. You do give me a little more hope in the system that we have but I am not 100% convinced!
Not that you are wrong it is just that I have seen so much corruption going on in the world!
0 Replies
 
reasoning logic
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 09:02 am
A coffee party anyone?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqW4F-EQ9LM
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  2  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 09:38 am
Wisconsin is not the only state that is wrestling. Here, Rachel Maddow details a bill being proposed in Michigan. The clip is long, more than 11 minutes. However, it details fascism in action.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53BkWfyb9n0
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  -3  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 09:43 am
@parados,
parados wrote:

But of course, how can police officers arrest someone if there is no legal justification? That would be kidnapping. Police officers are not under the jurisdiction of the Senate. They are supposed to uphold laws, not Senate resolutions. The Senate resolution has no legal power outside the Senate.


The flight of the Democrat senators from the state and their public refusals to testify as to their whereabouts suggests that either they believed otherwise, or that there was a massive deception of the public going on.

Alternatively, perhaps the Democrat legislators of Wisconsin are in serious need of your relentless pedantry.
plainoldme
 
  2  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 09:50 am
The Thursday, 10 March 2011, edition of THe Daily SHow closed with a clip of Republican saint, Ronald Reagan, declaring that collective bargaining is freedom.

How much you want to bet that the 1984-inspired followers of American fascism later alter that clip?
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 10:25 am
@georgeob1,
It matter not one bit what anyone believe you can not go around legally seizing people for not showing up at work,
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 10:33 am
@BillRM,
They also want all of us to believe that conservatives are the party of less government intrusion. Any conservative ready to buy that bridge in Montana?
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  5  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 10:42 am
@georgeob1,
So rather than finding a law that makes it illegal, you are going to rely on your interpretation of what you think the Democrat Senators maybe thought.

Sure george.. That is providing lots of facts to support your statement.. Laughing

I guess to idiots that simply make up facts anyone that relies on facts is a pedant.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  4  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 11:24 am
Wuh-oh for one of the GOP Senators in question -

http://malcontends.blogspot.com/2011/03/sen-randy-hoppers-wife-tells-protesters.html

Quote:
But protesters outside the Hopper house this week in Fond du Lac were met by his wife who reportedly came out and told them: Hopper no longer lives there, but with his 25-year-old mistress in Madison.

No confirmation on whether the divorcing wife signed that petition to recall Hopper who represents Wisconsin Senate District 18.


This is going to end quite poorly for several members of the WI GOP, who probably wish this whole thing never happened.

Cycloptichorn
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 11:26 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Loving it.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 11:26 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:

This is going to end quite poorly for several members of the WI GOP, who probably wish this whole thing never happened.

Cycloptichorn

Possibly so - but not as badly as it has worked out for the bagmen in the public services labor racket.
Cycloptichorn
 
  4  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 11:32 am
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:

Cycloptichorn wrote:

This is going to end quite poorly for several members of the WI GOP, who probably wish this whole thing never happened.

Cycloptichorn

Possibly so - but not as badly as it has worked out for the bagmen in the public services labor racket.


Your pejorative terms aside, I think that remains to be seen; and what more, the balance of evidence seems to show that their own membership and the public at large support them. Can't say the same for the state senators.

Cycloptichorn
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 11:35 am
@Cycloptichorn,
The long term track record for labor unions deprived of their state-enforced monopoly is not good. Those in Wisconsin may be an exception, but I wouldn't bet on it.
parados
 
  2  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 11:37 am
@Cycloptichorn,
It looks like he filed for divorce in August of last year so not a new revelation. Just salacious gossip.
Divorce filing for Hopper
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Mar, 2011 11:46 am
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:

The long term track record for labor unions deprived of their state-enforced monopoly is not good. Those in Wisconsin may be an exception, but I wouldn't bet on it.


Naturally, much of this depends on exactly how long the odious Walker bill remains intact. If the Unions aren't able to recall enough state senators and Walker, you could indeed be correct. However, the drive to both replace the politicians in question and repeal the bill indeed seems to be a potent one.

Cycloptichorn
 

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