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Coming Changes in Our Lives - agree or disagree?

 
 
Reply Mon 10 Jan, 2011 06:42 pm
COMING CHANGES IN OUR LIVES ...!



Whether these changes are good or bad depends in part on how we adapt to them but, ready or not, here they come!




1. The Post Office.
Get ready to imagine a world without the Post office. They are so deep in financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain it long term. Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office alive. Most of your mail every day is junk mail and bills.


2. The Check.
Britain is already laying the groundwork to do away with checks by 2018. It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process checks. Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the check. This plays right into the death of the post office. If you never paid your bills by mail and never received them by mail, the post office would absolutely go out of business.


3. The Newspaper.
The younger generation simply doesn't read the newspaper. They certainly don't subscribe to a daily delivered print edition. That may go the way of the milkman and the laundry man. As for reading the paper online, get ready to pay for it. The rise in mobile Internet devices and e-readers has caused all the newspaper and magazine publishers to form an alliance. They have met with Apple, Amazon, and the major cell phone companies to develop a model for paid subscription services.


4. The Book.
You say you will never give up the physical book that you hold in your hand and turn the literal pages. I said the same thing about downloading music from iTunes. I wanted my hard copy CD. But I quickly changed my mind when I discovered that I could get albums for half the price without ever leaving home to get the latest music. The same thing will happen with books. You can browse a bookstore online and even read a

preview chapter before you buy. And the price is less than half that of a real book. and think of the convenience once you start flicking your fingers on the screen instead of the book, you find that you are lost in the story, can't wait to see what happens next, and you forget that you're holding a gadget instead of a book.



5. The Land Line Telephone.


Unless you have a large family and make a lot of local calls, you don't need it anymore. Most people keep it simply because they've always had it. But you are paying double charges for that extra service. All the cell phone companies will let you call customers using the same cell provider for no charge against your minutes.


6. Music. This is one of the saddest parts of the change story. The music industry is dying a slow death. Not just because of illegal downloading. It's the lack of innovative new music being given a chance to get to the people who like to hear it. Greed and corruption are the problem. The record labels and the radio conglomerates are simply self-destructing. Over 40% of the music purchased today is "catalog items," meaning traditional music that the public is familiar with. Older established artists. This is also true on the live concert circuit. To explore this fascinating and disturbing topic further, check out the book, "Appetite for Self-Destruction" by Steve Knopper, and the video documentary, "Before the Music Dies."


7. Television.
Revenues to the networks are down dramatically. Not just because of the economy. People are watching TV and movies streamed from their computers. And they're playing games and doing lots of other things that take up the time that used to be spent watching TV. Prime time shows have degenerated down

to lower than the lowest common denominator. Cable rates are skyrocketing and commercials run about every 4 minutes and 30 seconds. I say good riddance to most of it . It's time for the cable companies to be put out of our misery. Let the people choose what they want to watch online and through Netflix.



8. The "Things."
That You Own. Many of the very possessions that we used to own are still in our lives, but we may not actually own them in the future. They may simply reside in "the cloud." Today your computer has a hard drive and you store your pictures, music, movies, and documents. Your software is on a CD or DVD,

and you can always re-install it if need be. But all of that is changing. Apple, Microsoft, and Google are all finishing up their latest "cloud services." That means that when you turn on a computer, the Internet will be built into the operating system. So, Windows, Google, and the Mac OS will be tied straight into the Internet. If you click an icon, it will open something in the Internet cloud. If you save something, it will be saved to the cloud. And you may pay a monthly subscription fee to the cloud provider. In this virtual world, you can access your music or your books, or your whatever from any laptop or handheld device. That's the good news. But, will you actually own any of this "stuff" or will it all be able to disappear at any moment in a big "Poof?" Will most of the things in our lives be disposable and whimsical? It makes you want to run to the closet and pull out that photo album, grab a book from the shelf, or open up a CD case and pull out the insert.


9. Privacy. If there ever was a concept that we can look back on nostalgically, it would be privacy. That's gone. It's been gone for a long time anyway. There are cameras on the street, in most of the buildings, and even built into your computer and cell phone. But you can be sure that 24/7 "They" know who you are and where you are, right down to the GPS coordinates, and the Google Street View. If you buy something, your habit is put into a zillion profiles, and your ads will change to reflect those habits. And "They" will try to get you to buy something else, again and again! All we will have that can't be changed are Memories.





SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT..... MOST OF THESE THINGS ARE ALREADY TAKING PLACE AND THE OUTCOME IS SET IN STONE .
 
peter jeffrey cobb
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jan, 2011 07:02 pm
@edgarblythe,
Wow thats scarry... And what would happen if there was an electro magnectic explosion or event outside earths atmosphere. I do hope they are keepping events like these in mind. While making all these changes that involve such profound meaning in our evreyday lives Smile
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jan, 2011 07:11 pm
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
5. The Land Line Telephone.

Unless you have a large family and make a lot of local calls, you don't need it anymore. Most people keep it simply because they've always had it. But you are paying double charges for that extra service. All the cell phone companies will let you call customers using the same cell provider for no charge against your minutes.

This one I absolutely disagree with.

It's cheaper for me to have a landline, than to use a cell phone. I don't make many calls, and cell phones and their plans are expensive in Canada. I very rarely make long distance call, too.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jan, 2011 07:26 pm
@edgarblythe,
Most of it is happening already - Europe virtually has no checks, everything
is done via bank transfer, automatic deductions and deposits. People have
bankcards that are accepted throughout Europe, or they pay cash (but less often). I do online banking and don't write checks very often.

I rarely use the post office, I hate going there! Not enough personnel and
long lines make it a bad experience. If possible I handle everything via email and via fax.

I canceled my newspaper last year, as I get better information and a variety of news online.

I could do without a TV too, but other family members like to watch.

I do have a land line and I still buy and read books, but I am thinking
about a kindle, it's just more convenient.

So, your points have a lot of validity, edgar.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jan, 2011 07:36 pm
@Reyn,
but...your habits are not the typical usage habits.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jan, 2011 07:39 pm
@CalamityJane,
The problem I see with a Kindle or 'reading device' is if you drop it or it needs some maintenance, it costs money and is generally irreparable. With a book if you drop it, you just pick it up. I buy a book once...then I could sell it used...or give it to a friend. Can't share my Kindle chapters with anyone ( I think) unless my dog wants to read the Kindle.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jan, 2011 07:49 pm
Quote:
Will most of the things in our lives be disposable and whimsical?


This is the line that got to me because I think most things are already disposable or whimsical but I want to think on it a bit before committing.

I completely disagree with him on the state of innovation in the music industry. If record companies are in the decline it's because people are fed up with them in the same way he's fed up with the cable companies.
ossobuco
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 10 Jan, 2011 07:54 pm
@boomerang,
Some major lot of us are not near wifi.


This is like porky pig oinking in some raving way, as yay yah, you have no voice.


Based on that, I'm not sure I care what you are tired of. Or, you of me.


boomerang
 
  5  
Reply Mon 10 Jan, 2011 08:05 pm
@ossobuco,
What!?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 05:55 am
I hope that millions of books will get stored in "time capsules" or the like. At least that portion of a knowledge base could be preserved, in the event it all crashes. I am not very knowledgeable about the options facing us.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 06:07 am
Redundancy is prevelent in the world of electronic records. The biggest danger there is electromagnetic pulse. That can wipe electronic records, and fry integrated, solid-state electronic devices. When a nuclear device explodes, it generates an EMP in the blast radius. One tactic of the late cold war would have been air burst nuclear devices to fry the enemies electronic systems. But a massive solar storm could also send out a devastating EMP.

I, too, would regret the passing of books which one holds in one's hand.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 07:25 am
@Setanta,
If your interests or job description requires you be wide as well as deep, then e-books dont cut it. Information on the web is notoriously un vetted. Even the shooting of GAbby Gifford this weekend was reported on Wiki that she was already dead, and that the result of nonames just editing for evil fun.

Science books and engineering texts take a beating fro use and are modified pretty much by committee, Art books (the big table size), examples of printing and photography, all IMHO will never look as good as on print and to size.

I use a reader for my journals (which I admit) are merely big piles of paper when done but I get a sense of connection to a series of related topics that were covered five or more years ago. In the wifi archives, Id have no idea what even to look for without some complicated Boolean seqrch. Actually, looking things up when you only know the general direction, is far more complicated on line thatn with books.

I dont mind e readers pfr certain topics but I need books for most of my deeper interests.

Newspapers on line are causing us all to go blind, seriously. I read the NYT on line and I have an optical aura after Im done and it takes several minutes before I can focus again.

Checks, I can do without em , weve gone pretty much deboit card since the early 2000's and like it better. Its even better to immediately ascertain what you need to do to "refresh" your dwindling pile of geld in the bank.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 11:53 am
I don't know if this really fits here or not, but I was thinking about this question and I started wondering if perhaps books will become beautiful objects again, now that so many people are switching to e-readers.

Once in a while I'll come across an old book that is so beautifully made that I'll buy it even though I'm not interested in reading it. It's something that was made to be kept. Maybe it has pretty end paper or deckled edges, something that sets it apart from it's mass produced cousins.

I'm a complete sucker for craftsmanship.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 12:02 pm
@edgarblythe,
That's great - especially number 1 - that means I would no longer have any bills!
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 12:03 pm
@Reyn,
In regard to this - does anyone know if you can have an alarm system without a landline phone? I actually want to get rid of my landline, but need it for our alarm system. When the alarm goes off - it "calls" the alarm company via our landline phone.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 12:37 pm
@boomerang,
When i was a child, we had books which were true works of art. We had Robinson Crusoe, Treasure Island, A Child's Garden of Verse and A Christmas Carol illustrated by Arthur Rackham. We had an abidged Death of Arthur by Thomas Mallory, illustrated by Arthur Rackham. We had Tanglewood Tales illustrated by Maxfield Parrish. We had The Wind in the Willows illustrated by the original illustrator (don't recall his name). We had many of the Beatrix Potter books. We had Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass illustrated by Tenneil.

You can't do any of those with an e-reader. They were treasures.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 12:44 pm
@Linkat,
Apparently you can, Linkat.
Quote:
Whether you’re at home, across the street or across the country, Total Connect lets you utilize the Internet, PDAs, cell phones and other web-enabled devices to control your security system, receive information remotely and much more. And our Video Services
option allows you to keep a close eye on your home and family from any remote location with Internet access.


http://www.postalarm.com/residential-online-system-management.htm
CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 12:49 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:
I completely disagree with him on the state of innovation in the music industry. If record companies are in the decline it's because people are fed up with them in the same way he's fed up with the cable companies.


I completely agree. Plus I paid enough money first for the vinyl records, then the tapes and then CD's. Most artists have one popular song on their CD and the rest is crap, yet you still pay for the entire CD - enough of that!! I rather download the music I want and pandora.com is just the nuts.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 12:57 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:
3. The Newspaper.
The younger generation simply doesn't read the newspaper. They certainly don't subscribe to a daily delivered print edition. That may go the way of the milkman and the laundry man. As for reading the paper online, get ready to pay for it. The rise in mobile Internet devices and e-readers has caused all the newspaper and magazine publishers to form an alliance. They have met with Apple, Amazon, and the major cell phone companies to develop a model for paid subscription services.


Disagree. Subscriptions for news is not going to be the winning business model online. The currently predominant business model of news consumption online (free, ad supported and merely having lower margins than old-world publishers enjoyed) is what is going to win and the old-world gate keepers of information will simply have to get used to lower margins (seriously, you don't need multi-billion-dollar companies to do a newspaper, they are simply just losing their old empires, the production and consumption of news is as healthy as ever, it's their stocks and expense accounts that are taking a hit).
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 01:32 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Death of Arthur[/i] by Thomas Mallory, illustrated by Arthur Rackham.


There's a Kindle version, almost 1,000 pages, complete with Rackham's illustrations.
 

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