10
   

On a serious note.

 
 
Reply Sat 30 Oct, 2010 10:05 pm
For the past few months I've been thinking that I really want/need to be coherent in the last hours/days preceding my death. There is information I feel a need to pass on/make known. Not last words/confessional type words, just information stuff that I don't want known beforehand. but that's pretty high risk considering we almost never know how or when we are going to die. So how does one retain private information while at the same time make sure it's available to those that need it after my death? Any thoughts/suggestions?
 
plainoldme
 
  2  
Reply Sat 30 Oct, 2010 10:12 pm
Perhaps, you can create either a document or a video of yourself and put it in a safe place. The person who is to execute your will could make it available to those you wish to share your statement with.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Oct, 2010 10:13 pm
@dyslexia,
Make a journal or whatever format seems appropriate using the word processor. Put this on disc, or store it some place, such as a Gmail document folder, where it can't get lost. Diane would then be able to access it all, provided you gave her the log in information. If I were doing it for myself, I would print it all and store it in a file, where nobody except myself ever goes. Or pre addressed envelopes, then into the file.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Oct, 2010 10:14 pm
@plainoldme,
I can't add nuttin' to that one!
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Oct, 2010 10:23 pm
@dlowan,
Thanks!
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 04:14 am
@dyslexia,
Have an estate lawyer draw your Will.
U can get references from your local bar association (probably).
U can have this information made public at the reading thereof,
or
u can give him a series of letters or of videotapes
dedicated to the individuals whose interests r concerned.



Good Luck.
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 10:18 am
for clairification, the information I am talking about is by no means secretive. the situation is simply that 1 1/2 years ago Lady Diane had a stroke from which she has shown excellent recovery excepting for memory losses. There is some basic information she would need at hand should I expire (pass words/account numbers/legal papers etc) that I want to have easily available to her and near at hand (a lawyer doesn't really fit that need) I'm now thinking I'll just get a small box of some kind and keep it in an an obvious easily accessible place in the house. Hope this clears up any mystery ( don't know where any bodies are buried and I'm not D. B. Cooper)
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 10:30 am

Type up a letter to her (large font, easy to read)
including everything that u want her to have.

Put her name in large letters on the outside of the envelope
and keep it somewhere that is obvious; thumbtack it to a wall,
magnet on the refrigerator, or put several copies
in several different places.
0 Replies
 
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 10:32 am
@dyslexia,
This is a high-tech version of David's wise legal counsel. Start by writing the data in a simple file (Notepad will do, all computers have it) and e-mail it to friends for safekeeping along with the lawyer's name and address. If you do keel over - try not to! - the file will be e-mailed to the law firm. Simple Smile
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 10:33 am
@dyslexia,
make sure at least one other trusted person knows where you've put the box.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 10:33 am
@dyslexia,
My father has a key safe that he's had for years. He hides the key, but he told me where he put it so if something happens, I can find it.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 10:44 am

Bob:
Please note that I suggest against trusting anyone
except only the Beneficiary (Diane)
with your confidential information.

Human history is too rife with instances of $$ changing
the situation and human motives unexpectedly.
Don 't let it happen to U.
Don 't let it happen to Diane.

"Trust no one."





David
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 10:51 am
dys - I think the old fashioned way would be best.

Buy an attractive journal, or have someone buy one for you. Make it one that lady diane will have reason to know where it is kept.
Write down any passwords, and other information in the back of it, and present it to her as a gift, with a kiss.
dyslexia
 
  2  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 10:54 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
Please note that I suggest against trusting anyone
except only the Beneficiary (Diane)
with your confidential information.
David, at this point in time, I'm in agreement with you.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 10:57 am
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:
dys - I think the old fashioned way would be best.

Buy an attractive journal, or have someone buy one for you.
Make it one that lady diane will have reason to know where it is kept.
Write down any passwords, and other information in the back of it, and present it to her as a gift, with a kiss.
While u both can,
u might take some time to discuss each of your respective biographies,
so that eventually, when one of u can 't,
there is less likelihood of permanent curiosity in the survivor.

Talk about what was good n bad in each of your lives,
and any way to improve it.





David
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 02:02 pm
I hate to pry. I assumed, of course, that the Lady Diane would be your executrix. However, from the outline of your situation, it sounds as though she might not be given that function, although I might be mistaken.

Do you have a will? Do you have a living will? Do you have medical power-of-attorney? I am concerned because it is beginning to sound like you do not have all the legal documents in place.

From the way your post began, I never assumed you were D. B. Cooper, but, I thought there was something more "folksy" that would be forthcoming, a life story.
George
 
  3  
Reply Mon 1 Nov, 2010 02:30 pm
I live in Massachusetts. My father was living in Indiana. He did me the
immense favor of sitting down with a lawyer and then a funeral director
and laying everything out. Then he called me. He told me the name of
the lawyer and the funeral director and that everything would be in the
drawer of the small table just to the right of the front door. The next
door neighbor would have the key to the door (I was elected because
he'd managed to alienate the rest of the family and a goodly portion of
his friends.)

A year or so later I got a call telling me he had died suddenly. When I got
to his town, I got the key from his neighbor and went into his house. A
small metal box was in the drawer of the table by the door. The next
couple of weeks were by no means easy, but it could have been a whole
lot worse.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Mon 1 Nov, 2010 04:14 pm
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:
I hate to pry. I assumed, of course, that the Lady Diane would be your executrix.
I know nothing of New Mexico, but in many jurisdictions,
the same man cannot be both executor and a beneficiary of a will.





David
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Nov, 2010 04:24 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Really? That just sounds like an excuse for someone to send bills to the estate.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Nov, 2010 04:35 pm
@roger,
statutory trusts & estates law


AGAIN, I have no idea what the law is in New Mexico.
I 've never been admitted to practice there.





David
0 Replies
 
 

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