15
   

What movie do you remember fondly that seems to be out of favor or lost?

 
 
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 08:54 pm
I think Johnny Dangerously has fallen on hard times, and it is HILARIOUS.

Sometimes a Great Notion

War of the Worlds

I've not seen my movies discussed much lately, but I don't get out of my sphere a lot.

Dive Inn.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 15 • Views: 2,457 • Replies: 30

 
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 09:08 pm
@ibstubro,
There was a Clint Eastwood Movie about a dying man trying to do a movie in Africa and get in an Elephant Hunt... Never seen it all and think it is a classic, called great white hunter or something... I loved what I saw of it...If we could all admit we were dying we might all be able to manage a little more honesty and a little less ass kissing politics...
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 09:13 pm
@Fido,
I believe it's called White Hunter Black Heart (1990)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0100928/
Haven't seen the film but I've heard about it.
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 09:50 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

I believe it's called White Hunter Black Heart (1990)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0100928/
Haven't seen the film but I've heard about it.
I liked a lot of peckinpaws, work and the Cohn brothers...
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:01 pm
The Deer Hunter. It was a powerfull movie when made, but it had no legs. Few can relate to it now.
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:11 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

The Deer Hunter. It was a powerfull movie when made, but it had no legs. Few can relate to it now.

I have hunted deer, and I have that thing of not killing and trying to square things with God, because you can sure get sick of death, and of people you love dying...
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  2  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:14 pm
Lonely are the Brave.
Paris Texas

two of my all time favorite films.
Diane
 
  3  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:22 pm
@dyslexia,
Doubt
Dr. Strangelove
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:26 pm
@ibstubro,
Most of John Sayles movies have been ignored and/or lost.

One such classic film of his that did get recognized once upon a time was Eight Men Out (1988.

Another older film that's quite relevant today in terms of the recent to burn or not to burn book scandal was Francois Truffaut's Fahrenheit 451 (1966).

I visually dated film with some great performances. Mel Gibson who presently owns the rights to the novel Fahrenheit 451 has threatened to remake the film for the past 8 years or so.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:28 pm
@dyslexia,
Paris Texas! Been there, traveling from Tulsa to Dallas. So this guy stumbles out of the Dew Drop Inn, looks at my license plate and points with his thumb while saying "Hey Okie, California is thataway". I had no desire to see the movie.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:28 pm
@Diane,
In cinephile circles, Dr. Strangelove is seen as one of Kubrick's most enduring films.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:42 pm
Square of Violence
Broderick Crawford plays the doctor who threw a bomb down on some Nazi officers, killing some of them. The officer in charge of the occupying army rounds up 300 citizens and stands them in the town square. He announces that all of them will die, unless the bomber turns himself in. When Broderick Crawford attempts to confess, the commander refuses to accept the confession. He must tell what the bomber left at the scene before he can be believed. The doc can't think of what he left behind. And even if he does, his own co conspirators are hiding nearby to shoot him before he can return to confess again. Otherwise, he might be made to betray their identities. Good cat and mouse thing there.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 11:08 pm
Also
Hud, with Paul Newman
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Sep, 2010 01:47 am
The Thin Man series. I loved the wit and sophistication of the characters. (Also loved Asta.) But Nick Charles was an alcoholic. Not attractive.
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Sep, 2010 08:33 am
The Man in the White Suit with Peter Sellers.
0 Replies
 
Chumly
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Sep, 2010 04:04 pm
Being There

Quote:
Chance (Peter Sellers) is a middle-aged gardener who lives in the townhouse of a wealthy man in Washington D.C. Chance seems very simple-minded and has lived in the house his whole life, tending the garden, with virtually no contact with the outside world. His cultural and social education is derived entirely from what he watches on the television sets provided by the "Old Man," who raised him. The only other person in his life is Louise, the maid who cooks his meals and looks upon him as nothing more than a child who has failed to grow up. When his benefactor dies, Chance is visited by attorneys handling the estate. They force him to leave his sheltered existence and discover the outside world for the first time.

He wanders aimlessly through a wintry and busy Washington in old-fashioned clothes, a homburg hat, suitcase, umbrella and a television remote from his old home. However, although finely-tailored many years ago, his clothes are of the style which has now come back into fashion during the period of the story, and so he is presumed to be an expensively, well-dressed man of means by those whom he encounters. In the evening Chance comes across a TV shop and sees his own image in one of the TVs captured by a camera in the shop window. While watching himself in it he is struck by a car owned by Ben Rand (Melvyn Douglas), a wealthy businessman.

Rand's wife Eve (Shirley MacLaine) invites Chance to their home (the famous Biltmore Estate doubles as the Rand Estate) to recover from his injured leg. After being offered alcohol for the first time in his life, Chance coughs over it while being asked his name which, instead of "Chance the Gardener" (which is what he said), is interpreted to be "Chauncey Gardiner." During dinner at the Rands' home, Chance describes attorneys coming to his former house and shutting it down. Judging by his appearance and overall demeanor, Ben Rand automatically assumes that Chauncey is an upper class, well-to-do, highly educated business man. Although Chance is really describing being kicked out of the home where he tended to the garden, Ben Rand perceives it as attorneys shutting down Chance's business because of financial problems; he even assumes it must have been caused by "kid lawyers from the SEC," obviously attributing it to have occurred at a higher, more sophisticated level than a tax/IRS problem, as most persons would likely have assumed. Sympathizing with him, Ben Rand takes Chance under his wing. Chance's personal style and seemingly conservative and insightful ways embody many qualities that Ben admires. His simplistic, serious-sounding utterances, which mostly concern the garden, are interpreted as allegorical statements of deep wisdom and knowledge regarding business matters and the current state of the economy in America.

Rand is also the confidant and adviser of the U.S. President (Jack Warden), whom he introduces to "Chauncey." Chance's remarks about how the garden changes with the seasons are interpreted by the President as economic and political advice, relating to his concerns about the mid-term unpopularity that many administrations face while in office. Chance, as Chauncey Gardiner, quickly rises to national public prominence. He becomes a media celebrity with an appearance on a television talk show, and is soon on the A-list of the most wanted in Washington society. Public opinion polls start to reflect just how much his "simple brand of wisdom" resonates with the jaded American public. At an upscale Washington cocktail lounge, two important, older, well-dressed men are discussing Chauncey; one says to the other, there is a rumor "he holds degrees in medicine as well as law."

Rand, dying of aplastic anemia, encourages his wife to become close to Chance, knowing Eve is a fragile woman. Rand's doctor (Richard A. Dysart) makes a few inquiries of his own and gets to see Chance for what he truly is — an actual gardener, totally oblivious and unaware to the ways of the world. However, the fact that Chance has given Rand an apparent acceptance of his illness and peace of mind with his imminent death makes the doctor hesitant to say anything. He also obviously sees that Chance possesses no guile, no intent to deceive, or any interest which would adversely impact Ben or Eve, or have any adverse effect upon Eve, or the estate, following Ben's death.

Just days before his death, Rand rewrites his will to include Chauncey. At his funeral, the President gives a long-winded read-out of various bon mots and quotes made by Rand over the years, which hardly impresses the pallbearers, who are members of the board of Rand's companies. They hold a whispered discussion over potential replacements for the President in the next term of office. As Rand's coffin is about to be interred in the family Masonic pyramid-like mausoleum, they unanimously agree on "Chauncey Gardiner."

Oblivious to all this, Chance wanders through Rand's wintry estate. Ever the gardener, he straightens out a pine sapling and then walks off, across the surface of a small lake. The audience now sees Chance physically walking on water. He pauses, dips his umbrella into the water under his feet as if testing its depth, turns, and then continues to walk on the water as Rand's quote "Life is a state of mind" is superimposed in the background.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Being_There
ibstubro
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Sep, 2010 04:25 pm
@Chumly,
I remember, and as a matter of fact, I was excited when the newspapers reported my cousin's grandson to be "Chance". I was, like, "Wow, you mean like Chancy Gardener from Being there??" Turns out of was a typo for the much blander "Chace".
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Sep, 2010 07:26 pm
Fletch and Fletch Lives lol. So many funny lines.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2010 05:09 am
@Irishk,
Let's hope the Fletch prequel, Fletch Won, lives up to the the Chevy Chase legacy. Smile
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2010 09:55 am
@ibstubro,
ibstubro wrote:

I think Johnny Dangerously has fallen on hard times, and it is HILARIOUS.

Indeed.



ibstubro wrote:
War of the Worlds

The original Gene Barry one? That scared the living crap out of me when I saw it as a kid.

There are many movies that have fallen out of favor over the years. I recall hearing about a list made by movie critics in the 1950s of the greatest movies of all time. Citizen Kane wasn't on the list at all. Instead were movies like The Big Parade, which was regarded as one of the greatest movies from the silent era and which is, nowadays, barely remembered (it doesn't help that it isn't on DVD). Shirley Temple was the top box office star for four straight years, and her movies are all sentimental pabulum (Temple, though, was a great actress).

I think One, Two, Three is hilarious, and I recently heard someone mention it on NPR. It's a movie that centers on East-West relations in Berlin during the Cold War. Apparently, a few weeks before the movie was released the communists built the Berlin Wall, so no one was really in the mood to see a movie making light of that situation. This was after Billy Wilder made The Apartment, and the conventional wisdom among critics is that Wilder didn't make another great movie after that. Not true.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » What movie do you remember fondly that seems to be out of favor or lost?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 02/27/2021 at 01:50:46