18
   

Girls and Ladies? How do you react to being called Ma'am?

 
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 10:47 am
@chai2,
Quote:
I had an applicant call me "mommi" on the phone the other day....that was not good for him.

Did you completely discount his application because of this singular cultural slippage? I hope that he got a slight chance based on his potentiality of good employment or work history and not this slight cultural faux pas.
eoe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 10:56 am
@tsarstepan,
That wasn't a cultural slippage. Let's not get it twisted. That was a sure sign that the applicant was unprofessional and had absolutely no sense of propriety, decorum or protocol. No different than if a black guy called her "mama" or a white guy called her "sweetie". That's not the correct language to use when applying for a job in any culture.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 10:59 am
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

Quote:
I had an applicant call me "mommi" on the phone the other day....that was not good for him.

Did you completely discount his application because of this singular cultural slippage? I hope that he got a slight chance based on his potentiality of good employment or work history and not this slight cultural faux pas.


No, it was part of the entire package.

If, for instance we had been on the phone for a long time, developed a relationship of a sort, and I was generally approving of him, it MIGHT have been different IF it happened way late in the conversation.

The job interview process is serious, and not the place to be calling someone "Honey, dear, mommi, etc." I had a native Texan call me "darlin" during our conversation, same reult.
There's only one way I might have overlooked that faux pas of mommi. If, we had had a successful phone interview, and I was setting him up to meet with the next level, and he became very excited over the prospect, and blurted it out.

When I'm trying to suss out your character, and am digging as to why you left a previous job, I'm not you mommi, mija or darlin', and you are not having a casual conversation with me.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 10:59 am
@eoe,
eoe wrote:

That wasn't a cultural slippage. Let's not get it twisted. That was a sure sign that the applicant was unprofessional and had absolutely no sense of propriety, decorum or protocol. No different than if a black guy called her "mama" or a white guy called her "sweetie". That's not the correct language to use when applying for a job in any culture.



Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 03:13 pm
Mommi! I've never heard of that in anything but a family situation. Is that a regional thing?

We also spell it Mommy or Mummy, but not with an "i" - that must be regional too.
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 03:26 pm
@Mame,
Roberta refered to Hispanics saying it. It's probably pronounced more along the lines of Mami in Spanish. I've never heard it said around here. It must be a New York-Puerto Rican thing.
0 Replies
 
eoe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 03:26 pm
@Mame,
It's an Hispanic term of endearment. I've had both males and females call me 'mommy' (not sure on the exact spelling, tho). Men are often called 'popi'.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 03:28 pm
@Mame,
It's an Hispanic thing.


Next time you're getting frisky with Alex, cry out "AIEEE POPPI!"
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 03:29 pm
@eoe,
Papi
eoe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 03:30 pm
@InfraBlue,
got it.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 03:34 pm
thanks infrablue.

Here, I more hear people being called mija or mijo.
eoe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 09:49 pm
@chai2,
explain please. I'm not familiar with the terminology.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 09:52 pm
@chai2,
mija and mijo, I know
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 09:56 pm
@ossobuco,
Not me. What do they mean?

I have heard 'mano. Short for hermano, meaning brother.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 10:03 pm
@roger,
Snort, a best friend is known as mijo. but in a multi lingual way.

0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 10:19 pm
@roger,
Sigh. I looked this up and forgot it from there to here.

Anyway, mija and mijo are usual.
0 Replies
 
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 10:26 pm
Doesn't bother me mostly. It seems most people that have to bring attention to a title are usually pretty insecure.

The only reason it bothers me, is it is a fairly new happening for me - from younger folks (20 year olds) . Just means I am getting old enough to not be considered one of the young'uns. Dealing...gracefully I hope. Smile
eoe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 11:19 pm
@mismi,
mismi wrote:

It seems most people that have to bring attention to a title are usually pretty insecure.

The only reason it bothers me...


'nuff said. Laughing
Finn dAbuzz
 
  0  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 11:44 pm
Only a self-absorbed idiot like Barbara Boxer has a problem with it.

In all but the rarest of occassions, it is a term of respect.

If you have a vanity problem with your age and don't like it, it's your issue.

Would you rather be addressed as "Hey Lady?"
margo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 12:51 am
I don't hear Ma'am often here - although it is creeping in. I can cope with that.

I particularly hate "dear"...it immediately brings to mind an image of Bambi - and I'm certainly not Bambi-like.

Calling me "love" or "darling" may cause damage to your testicles or eye sockets.

One of our clients always calls me "mate" - a term not usually used for females - and always brings a smile.

I'm irritated when, on calling some financial organisation that has stuffed up again (hello, American Express) - I get a call centre in far off Wonky-stan, and that pretend Engrish speaker calls me by my first name.

I always call my boss "sir" as I kiss the hem of his garment! Ha!
 

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