6
   

"Used" v. "Refurbished"

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2010 08:59 pm
@boomerang,
My nikkormats are just around 35 (got them used in the first place, so probably more). The two cameras I'd still like to have are a Rolleicord that a hollywood cameraman friend of my dad's gave me in the 50's, and my dad's old Argus from WW2 era (that was stolen from our studio. I gave the Rollei away to a friend learning photography. Slaps self.) On the Argus, that was the camera I learned on, plus being my dad's, sentimental...

Sorry, tangent..
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2010 09:01 pm
@boomerang,
yes, I think she is not setting it properly. That is so easily remedied with a peak at a printed manual. Or she can got camera dealer to help her or just look it up online.

Another popular oldtime 35 mm rangefinder were the Argus C3 (also known as 'the brick').
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2010 09:05 pm
@ossobuco,
The various models of Nikkormat range in dates from 1972 to 1978.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2010 09:10 pm
@Ragman,
Is IS stunning the amount of information you can find in those manuals!

For me (a computer moron) switching to digital from film was like learning a whole new language. "White balance!? Ohhhhh..... you mean color temperature. Okay, now I get it."
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2010 09:12 pm
@Ragman,
And Nikormat? as opposed to the Nikkormat? I don't remember which one I bought first, probably the Nikormat. The Argus was stolen in '75, so I bought the first one just after that, but used (good camera store in Westwood). And the second, sometime later. The N 70, in '99.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2010 10:08 pm
@ossobuco,
Sorry..but the '70s Nikon model known as Nikkormat went from 72-78. there was a predecessor model that is known as Nikkormat FS and FT, FTN 65-67. Then FTN went to 74. The more modern model is FT2 went from 75-78 and FT3 77-78.

However, not to put too fine a point on it, there was no such thing as Nikormat as Nikon model.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jul, 2010 12:23 pm
@Ragman,
That occurred to me. It was a real warhorse, and I took the best photos of my life with it, however faux. I just rechecked and that was Nikomat (an FT with a long serial number), not Nikkormat.
I checked that online and found that it was the japanese version of Nikkormat.

http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/special/nikomat.htm

More info here - http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikomat/
From this I see that these early nikons were sold as Nikomat in Asia and Nikkormat in the west..
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jul, 2010 01:05 pm
@ossobuco,
thanks, I appreciate the correction. This helps me to expand my understanding of the non-domestic models as I was not a student (nor a collector) of foreign models of older classic cams. I have about 40 yrs of experience as a photog as well as some 5 yr of photo retail, but almost no experience with foreign models. can be tricky as a collector or consumer.

From what I know of your background, Osso, with your artistic eye you'd be able to take good pix with an old Kodak Brownie!
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jul, 2010 01:26 pm
@ossobuco,
BTW, it is not faux. Don't misunderstand my comments. The Nikomat nameplate is just Japan's spelling within their domestic market.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikomat

Ah, ok..you found out. good research.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jul, 2010 01:37 pm
@Ragman,
My mother had a Brownie... my dad's Argus won. My own first camera was an Instamatic, then the Rollei, then I inherited the Argus...

I should look into getting my old Niko/Nikkor s fixed - I did back in California and didn't want to spend the money, though there was a guy in the area who could do it at the time. Aside from the money, I suppose the chances of getting one fixed are diminishing with the years. What's wrong with them? I don't remember and am not sure I could tell at this point.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jul, 2010 01:38 pm
@Ragman,
But it had occurred to me it might be faux. Just that the camera didn't "feel" like it at all.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jul, 2010 01:57 pm
@ossobuco,
Naww..you got the real deal. Faux cameras never seem to hold up to the test of time. Also their serial numbers can validate them easily.

The parts for the old Nikon and Nikkormats have been drying up for decades. Many times it's not worth the time or trouble, even if you wanted to.

The first of the important things that goes is the shutter, which can still be fixed if you have a good independent repair facility. Forget sending it to Nikon (another rat-hole issue entirely) as they are not interested. Repairs to shutters can vary between $100 AND $150 or even as much as $175. The CLA repair (clean, lube and adjust) is always a good recommendation for any camera.

The other important issue is light leaks to the back. No need to explain much there. Suffice it to say, a good independent repair place can modify and repair the back. Rubber or neoprene gaskets can be modified/fashioned if there is a leak.

Light meters by now would have failed and not likely to be worth fixing. Most people don't bother getting them fixed. These all used to use Mercury batteries for the circuitry, but there are newer batt. alternatives for this.

Another minor issue is the gaskets and springs for the mirror area. These crack and you can tell by the slap (or no op) sound. Well, if you need help locating a good repair facility in your area, I can give you some links and leads.
0 Replies
 
 

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