3
   

Football in Canada/USA

 
 
Reply Sun 13 Jun, 2010 05:17 am
How did it come to be that in Canada and the United States, football refers to gridiron and in the rest of the world, football refers to soccer?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 3,933 • Replies: 13
No top replies

 
Worth 1000 Words
 
  2  
Reply Sun 13 Jun, 2010 05:24 am
@Victor Eremita,
http://img205.imageshack.us/img205/6795/handegg.jpg
Victor Eremita
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jun, 2010 05:28 am
@Worth 1000 Words,
Lol I agree that football makes more sense to refer to soccer. But still, Canada/USA still calls "handegg" football
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jun, 2010 05:31 am
@Victor Eremita,

for one thing, in the olden days of handegg there was a lot more foot-play than there is now...
Victor Eremita
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jun, 2010 05:54 am
@Region Philbis,
I would imagine so; punting is still there..
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jun, 2010 06:04 am
@Victor Eremita,

kickoffs, punting and field goals are still prevelent.

the drop kick is all but extinct, despite doug flutie's solo attempt at reviving it.
Quote:
A drop kick is made when the kicker drops the ball and then kicks it when it bounces off the ground. This kick was popular in the early 1900s. However, the modern American football is more pointed on both ends, making the bounce less reliable. The main advantages of the drop kick are that 1) the kicking team gains an additional blocker and 2) there is one less person (the holder) who has to do their job perfectly to succeed. Because the advantage of an extra blocker is minimal and professional teams practice their special teams so frequently (meaning the holds are usually good), drop kicks are rarely seen because only straight-on kickers can do it for the most part.
(wikipedia)
Victor Eremita
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jun, 2010 06:27 am
@Region Philbis,
Ah yes Doug Flutie. Known on both sides of the border.
Interesting. I guess we should rename football haha
0 Replies
 
noinipo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 05:49 pm
Football is a misnomer for a game that is played 99% with the hands.
Soccer would sound strange if it was called handball.
noinipo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Feb, 2011 06:26 pm
@noinipo,

Each NFL player sees about six minutes of action per game. The rest of the time he stands around or sits on a bench.
-----------------------
According to a Wall Street Journal study of four recent broadcasts, and similar estimates by researchers, the average amount of time the ball is in play on the field during an NFL game is about 11 minutes.
.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704281204575002852055561406.html
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Feb, 2011 10:27 pm
The American and Canadian games grew out of what is sometimes referred to as Rugby football. This game evolved on the North American continent in different ways than it did in England, and in England, what North Americans call soccer and the game of Rugby football both evolved from the game which was played at least as far back as the middle ages, and probably longer ago than that.

In the 1870s, McGill University in Montréal played Harvard University of Massachusetts, and they agreed to play by "Harvard rules." Those rules were an evolution of Rugby football (Rugby is a "Public School" in England, what would be called private school in North America). Since that time, the game evolved seperately in Canada and the United States, although both countries influenced each other in the devolopment of the game. The principle differences today are that in Canadian football the offensive team has three downs (three attempts) to gain ten yards, and there are four downs in the American game--meaning that the passing game has become more important in Canada. The Canadian field is ten yards longer than the American field, and there is a slight difference in scoring successful field goal attempts.

Rugby football itself was a departure from what North Americans call soccer, which may have been introduced into Britain by the Romans. The game was given a set of written rules in England by Eton College (once again, what Americans would call a private secondary school) early in the 19th century, and then those rules were standardized by what were known as Cambridge rules. At Rugby, in the 18th century, players were allowed to handle the ball, but not to run toward the opposing goal with the ball in one's hands. Then in the 19th century, written rules for "Rugby football" allowed players to run toward the opposing goal with the ball in the player's hands. American, Canadian and Australian football, the first two slightly different but otherwise similar games, and the third significantly different, all developed from Rugby football. In North America, universities in what is now called the Ivy League adopted the Harvard Rules, which were altered slightly in negotiations with McGill in 1876, and from which the Canadian and American games evolved.
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Mon 7 Feb, 2011 05:14 pm
@Setanta,

Might be worth adding as a footnote to Set's piece, that in England we had the two games, Rugby Football and, following the formation of the Football Association and the making of codified rules, Association Football.

Rugby was called "rugger" and the other was called "soccer", following the fashion of the period. "Soccer" is just a contraction of the word "association".
noinipo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 12:10 pm
@noinipo,
I took the NFL about four decades to learn how to kick a football properly. A college kid born in Hungary showed them how it's done.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 02:46 pm
@McTag,
McTag wrote:
"Soccer" is just a contraction of the word "association".


Well now, that's interesting. I hadn't known that . . .
0 Replies
 
bill22
 
  0  
Reply Wed 6 Jul, 2011 09:35 pm
@Region Philbis,
Thank you for sharing the answer.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Football in Canada/USA
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 07/17/2019 at 09:26:58