8
   

What does it take to become a 'World Cuisine'?

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 May, 2005 08:14 am
Me too, me too.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 May, 2005 08:21 am
peru-welcome aboard. This thread has , more or less been reactivated every so often because its author, a well known chef in Toronto, left us in February of this year and we miss his wit and wisdom.
Im sure if cav were still alive, hed be all full of questions and ideas about peruvian dishes. You would have liked him.

PS, my only dealings with PEruvian food was when I worked in the San Martin region. I had some of the little guinea pig treats.
There is a very good Peru/Japanese restaurant in New York Ive only eaten there once and I liked the food. Im sure that it was neither fully Japanese nor Pervian but an influence from each.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Feb, 2013 03:43 pm
@farmerman,
Resurrecting this thread in cavs honor because I taped a Tony Bourdain show of his latest series "The Layover". In this one he was spending a day in Nawlins (my adopted hometown) . He had a discussion with some chefs and food writers who said that New Orleans (cajun and creaole) are the only two authentic American cuisines we have, weverything else is so derivative that its hardly associated with an area.

cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 11:53 am
@farmerman,
It's my belief that all foods can be considered "world cuisine." It's because of man's mobility from thousands of years ago when food stuff were eaten by most travelers who traveled by ship, camel, horse, or wagons. When a group of any culture moves to another location, they prepare foods of their home country which eventually becomes shared in restaurants to all customers.

Today's explosion on cultural foods all over the world is the evidence. One can even go to any country, and find foods from other countries.

In our neighborhood in Silicon Valley, we have Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Indian, German,, Middle Eastern, African, Mexican, English, all manners of steak restaurants, bbq, fast food, and combinations of all of them in one foodcourt or restaurant.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 12:11 pm
@cicerone imposter,
yes but do you have a "Silicon Valley" cuisine"? Ill bet not.
worldtraveler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 12:54 pm
@farmerman,
The question is "what do you consider as Silicon Valley cuisine?" Maybe it exists, but nobody has defined it - yet.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 04:41 pm
@farmerman,
This guy completely ignores the American Southwest whereby the US came into a rather large ethnicity with its own diverse fusion of indigenous and European cuisine.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 05:07 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
He had a discussion with some chefs and food writers who said that New Orleans (cajun and creaole) are the only two authentic American cuisines we have, weverything else is so derivative that its hardly associated with an area.

I guess I don't think that it has to be completely original so much as completely distinctive.

Tex-Mex is an example of something derivative yet distinctive.

And I'd also suggest that the cooking style of the Native Americans is original. In particular the maize/corn dishes (tortillas, masa, hominy, etc.), and smoked peppers. Pulque, anyone?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 05:21 pm
@DrewDad,
YEh, native American has never had its due, xcept at the Smithsonian Museum of American Indian Culture. There they serve traditional meals of the "three sisters" and wild turkey and fish.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 05:21 pm
@DrewDad,
YEh, native American has never had its due, xcept at the Smithsonian Museum of American Indian Culture. There they serve traditional meals of the "three sisters" and wild turkey and fish.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 05:22 pm
@DrewDad,
DD, What's the difference between Mexican and Tex-Mex cuisine?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 05:22 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
In this one he was spending a day in Nawlins (my adopted hometown) . He had a discussion with some chefs and food writers who said that New Orleans (cajun and creaole) are the only two authentic American cuisines we have


what do you expect them to say? doesn't mean they're right
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 05:24 pm
@ehBeth,
Some info on Native American cuisine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_cuisine
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 05:34 pm
@cavfancier,
interesting to re-read the starting post

cavfancier wrote:

Well, there are a few factors. One, you need a long-standing tradition of 'palace' cuisine. Two, you need a well-heeled and delicious 'peasant' cuisine. Three, you need a culture that readily cultivates such fine arts.



I would love to have been able to get cav's take on the developments in the local cooking scene, let alone the rest of the world.

We could use BigDice back, but I think he's busy with his restaurant.

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 05:38 pm
@ehBeth,
Big Dice was a chef too? damn, where was my head. I always thought he was a mobster
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 05:46 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Now there's a question (smiles).
0 Replies
 
elementswhiteplains
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 10:57 am
@cavfancier,
You should have a good and well trained chef. .so that the people well surely like the foods. .
0 Replies
 
 

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