11
   

I Love Boobies

 
 
djjd62
 
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 07:15 am
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/05/11/national/main6471986.shtml
"Boobies" Bracelets Cause Stir in Wash. School
High School Bans Breast Cancer Bracelets, Citing Classroom Disturbances; Students, Parents Question Move

A Silverdale school is asking students not to wear bracelets that are intended to teach them about breast cancer.

The problem at Klahowya Secondary School is the message printed on the bracelets, "I love Boobies. Keep-A-Breast."

Principal Ryan Stevens told The Kitsap Sun the "boobies" reference causes problems in classrooms when some students made inappropriate gestures. He also says some staff members who are breast cancer survivors find the bracelets offensive.

The school is telling students to either turn them around or take them off.

But 16-year-old student Brittany Indvik said it's a good cause and the bracelet ban is a threat to her freedom of expression.

"It's a good cause and we're not allowed to stand up for it," she told the Sun. Teachers "tell us to stand up for something and then we get shot down for it."

The bracelets come from the California nonprofit Keep-A-Breast Foundation.

Indvik's mother, Victoria Burton, told the Sun that the school's ban on the rubber bracelets has only drawn more attention to them. Burton also said the school should focus its attention on other issues.

"There are other kids wearing really inappropriate T-shirts, students making out in the hallways," she said. "It's just funny that the school has picked that to ban. There are lots of other things they should be banning."
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 07:17 am
people everyhere are just LOOKING for something to be offended by.


they are acting like a bunch'a boobs
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 07:44 am
@shewolfnm,


http://pix.motivatedphotos.com/2008/6/20/633495171199936172-Boobies.jpg
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 07:52 am
Oh for gods sake.

ANYTHING that brings awareness to breast cancer is good, IMO.

I've see "Save the TaTas" bumper stickers a few times.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  3  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 08:23 am
@djjd62,
Actually I'm quite happy about the story. The purpose of the story is to raise awareness of breast cancer. And the school's plump attempt of censorship is helping them do exactly that. As the article notes, "Indvik's mother, Victoria Burton, told the Sun that the school's ban on the rubber bracelets has only drawn more attention to them." Victoria Burton nailed it!
djjd62
 
  2  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 09:35 am
@Thomas,
exactly, banning is almost always good for the thing being banned
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 09:40 am
@Thomas,
I don't think the school is worried about drawing more attention to them because they don't seem to have an issue with the braclets themselves. The issue seems to be that they are causing class disturbances. If these braclets are causing juveniles to be more juvenile, I don't see any issue with the school telling students to advocate somewhere else and let school time be for learning.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 10:01 am
@engineer,
Quote:
learning
?
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 10:11 am
@dyslexia,
Very Happy
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 11:51 am
@dyslexia,
At the risk of making a fool of myself, what do you think it should be?
shewolfnm
 
  3  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 11:56 am
@Region Philbis,
who doesnt love a great pair of little pretty tits

http://www.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/2553987/2/istockphoto_2553987-great-tits.jpg
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 12:10 pm
@engineer,
Quote:
If these braclets are causing juveniles to be more juvenile, I don't see any issue with the school telling students to advocate somewhere else and let school time be for learning.


Isn't it juvenile not to address such an important issue, E? How could time spent on this, even with some hilarity involved, not be learning?
0 Replies
 
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 12:11 pm
I think the school is being reasonable (and I am a bit amused by this thread). My opinion on the mattered is perhaps colored by the fact I am a former teacher. I wonder if there other people here with experience in the classroom would share my view..

Having a bunch of 14 year old kids running around saying "I love boobies" is not generally helpful to the educational process. It is not unreasonable to expect that this might make some kids at this already sensitive age a bit uncomfortable.

There are responsible ways to highlight breast cancer that don't exploit kids sexuality.



JTT
 
  2  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 12:18 pm
@ebrown p,
Quote:
Having a bunch of 14 year old kids running around saying "I love boobies" is not generally helpful to the educational process. It is not unreasonable to expect that this might make some kids at this already sensitive age a bit uncomfortable.


That flies in the face of reality because we have a bunch of adults running around saying "I love boobies" but you want to instruct the kids that it's an inappropriate thing to be saying.

Instead of continually encouraging such juvenile behavior, on the parts of the adults, this stands as a real teachable moment, a chance to illustrate the importance of what seems to some to be a joke.
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 12:28 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
because we have a bunch of adults running around saying "I love boobies"


JTT, some homework...

Print out a sign that says "I love boobies" in big letters. Then hang this up in your office. There are places where saying "I love boobies" is simply not appropriate.

Cute sexual double entendres in an educational or business setting are not appropriate. There are better ways to get the message across that don't lead to distraction or teasing.




JTT
 
  2  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 12:32 pm
@djjd62,
Quote:
Principal Ryan Stevens told The Kitsap Sun the "boobies" reference causes problems in classrooms when some students made inappropriate gestures. He also says some staff members who are breast cancer survivors find the bracelets offensive.


So often, this type of thing is reported as if what the person "in power" is saying is important/relevant. Again, here's a chance to help kids understand what is appropriate/inappropriate and more importantly where it's appropriate.

Doesn't the whole concept of freedom of speech entail that the speech that is most offensive is that which needs the greatest protection?

ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 12:42 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
Doesn't the whole concept of freedom of speech entail that the speech that is most offensive is that which needs the greatest protection?


Yes of course. The issue here isn't free speech... it is providing a productive environment for education.

There are legal limits on speech in the workplace and in schools. You can be prevented from making sexual jokes, or wearing clothing with sexually explicit writing on it at your workplace. This is because society's interest in making sure workplaces are inclusive and aren't hostile is more important then your right to expression in this environment.

The same is for schools. The principal has a duty (and a legal responsibility) to create an environment that is safe and fair to his employees as well as the students.

JTT... You are arguing for offensive speech in schools-- in truth there are much more offensive ideas then these bracelets. Are you really arguing that kids should be allowed to wear any message in public schools?
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 12:47 pm
@ebrown p,
That would be fine with me, EBrown. I would support such a campaign and would be more than willing to deliver a series of posters to other businesses and schools. I would be willing to give speeches at schools to help kids understand just how important this is.

And yes, the humor could all be part of it. There's nothing offensive about a set of boobies. There is something deeply offensive about adults who are so hung up that they can't help kids learn about an exceedingly important real life and death issue. What could possibly be a more important educational issue?
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 12:58 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
That would be fine with me, EBrown. I would support such a campaign and would be more than willing to deliver a series of posters to other businesses and schools. I would be willing to give speeches at schools to help kids understand just how important this is.


What question are you answering here? I don't think you answered my actual question.

Do you think that kids in school (or adults in the workplace) should be allowed to wear any message no matter how offensive? This would include messages that you would consider offensive (i.e. racist or sexist). Note that I am very clearly making a distinction between what is appropriate in school and work (as special cases) and what would be appropriate elsewhere.

Whether schools or businesses have the responsibility to restrict what messages are worn on clothing is an important question-- if we agree that there are some cases that messages should be restricted... then we can talk about this specific instance.
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  2  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 01:00 pm
@engineer,
engineer wrote:

At the risk of making a fool of myself, what do you think it should be?
I'm thinking that increasing awareness/knowledge of breast cancer should be considered "learning".
 

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