7
   

UK Election Set For May 6th!

 
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 07:51 pm
@realjohnboy,
Good night, Mr. RJB.

Take care of your back.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 08:00 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
I never wonder about the addiction. mrs hamburger had me interested in politics at quite a young age, took me canvassing for Committee for an Independent Canada at one point.

I stayed in, watching party conventions, instead of playing, when I was 8 - 10 years old - discussing the results with my friends' parents. It's in my blood Very Very Happy


Oh good, Beth. If you're not worried, I'll try not to be, either! Wink

What a terrific political upbringing you had!
hamburgboy
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 08:02 pm
@msolga,
i imagine that you are keeping an eye on the BBC election site already ... but in case you are not :

TUNE IN NOW !

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/default.stm

........................................................................

Quote:
There are calls for an inquiry and angry scenes after long queues lead to hundreds of people being stopped from voting.

.........................................................................
most unusual to turn away people who are ready to vote , i'd say .
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 08:04 pm
@hamburgboy,
I've been watching it for hours, hamburger!

(And I've just learned about Beth's political upbringing! Wink
Is it still your birthday? Or are we now onto the day after?)
hamburgboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 08:10 pm
@msolga,
Quote:
Or are we now onto the day after



in canada it's still today ( just 10 pm eastern daylight savings time - or : twentytwohundred hours ) ... ...

but in britain it's tomorrow already - about 3 a.m .

the presses are rolling with the latest edition .
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 08:14 pm
@hamburgboy,
Well happy birthday again, then! I hope it was a good day for you. Very Happy

Yes, I know it's early morning in the UK, from watching that BBC coverage for hours & hours.
0 Replies
 
hamburgboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 08:15 pm
@hamburgboy,
and from the TIMES-ON-LINE :

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/

Quote:
Cliffhanger points to hung Parliament


( they are still hanging them in britain ? that seems rather harsh imo )
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 08:18 pm
@hamburgboy,
Interesting couple of headlines!

Quote:
*Cameron: 'Labour has lost mandate to govern'
*Brown: I'll try for coalition.
hamburgboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 08:27 pm
@msolga,
it looks as if the conservative will have more seats than the labour party - but no absolute majority - should be interesting - more stockmarket WOBBLIES to be expected ???

britain seems to be split : 1/3 ( roughly ) conservative , 1/3 labour , 1/3 " all others "
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 06:26 am
Quote:
6.07am: So much for decision day. This seems to be an election without a result. As Lord Ashdown said earlier, "the country has spoken - but we don't know what they've said". ....

A hung parliament is virtually inevitable. With more than 500 seats counted, the BBC is predicting that the Conservatives will end up with 306 seats, Labour 262 seats and the Lib Dems 55 seats. The Conservatives are currently on 37% of the vote, Labour on 28% and the Lib Dems on 23%.

Gordon Brown has said that it is his "duty" to try to form a stable government. Constitutionally, he is right. Given that the Tories do not have a majority, he is entitled to form a government and to try to get a Queen's speech through the Commons. He only has to resign if the Queen's speech is voted down. (Effectively it's a confidence vote.) Although some reporters travelling with him think he seems gloomy about his long-term prospects, he claims to be "energised" by the result and Labour have started semi-public negotiations with the Lib Dems about a coalition. Ministers such as Lord Mandelson and Alan Johnson have indicated that they would like to do a deal over PR.

David Cameron has said that Brown no longer has a right to govern. But Cameron has not demanded Brown's resignation, and he has indicated that he is not going push for a hasty resolution of the situation. It looks as if Brown will remain in Downing Street for the next few days at least, and perhaps for much longer.

The Liberal Democrats have had a terrible night. Their share of the vote has gone up just 1 point and they have lost seats. But Nick Clegg - the man who used to say he wasn't a kingmaker - has become the kingmaker. He holds the balance of power. In the past he has said that the party that wins should have first right to try to form a government. But Lib Dems have said that that does not mean the party would automatically support the Tories. As I write, Clegg himself has not spoken.

......

Independent candidates have not made a breakthrough. Esther Rantzen did not get elected and two independents who sat in the last parliament - Dai Davies and Richard Taylor - were defeated.

The Green party got its first candidate into parliament when Caroline Lucas won Brighton Pavilion.

Hundreds of people were not able to vote because of problems at polling stations. The Electoral Commission has ordered an inquiry.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/may/06/uk-election-results-2010-live
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 07:13 am
@msolga,
Quote:
Brown issues mayday call for coalition partners
By Emma Alberici and wires
Posted 2 hours 38 minutes ago


http://www.abc.net.au/reslib/201005/r562662_3415004.jpg
Gordon Brown needs to cobble together a coalition if he is to survive as prime minister. (Reuters: Suzanne Plunkett )

British prime minister Gordon Brown said he would ensure the country had a "strong, stable" government after an inconclusive election left no party with an outright parliamentary majority.

Mr Brown said he had asked the cabinet secretary, Britain's most senior civil servant, to arrange support for all parties that might be involved in talks over a possible future coalition government.

"It is my duty as prime minister to take all steps to ensure Britain has a strong, stable and principled government," Mr Brown said.

"I have asked the cabinet secretary to arrange for the civil service to provide support on request to parties engaged in discussions on the formation of government."

With 621 seats out of 650 reported, the Conservatives had 291 seats against Labour's 251. The Tories have picked up 92 seats but the swing is not enough to give them an overall majority.

Mr Brown is still the prime minister for now and will need to cobble together a coalition if he is to survive, but that is looking less likely with Liberal Democrats leader Nick Clegg saying he will talk to the Conservatives first.

"I've said that whichever party gets the most votes and the most seats, if not an absolute majority, has the first right to seek to govern, either on its own or by reaching out to other parties," Mr Clegg said.

"And I stick to that view. It seems this morning that it's the Conservative party."...<cont>


http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/05/07/2893726.htm
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 07:42 am
@msolga,
Interesting times!!!
hamburgboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 07:52 am
@dlowan,
Quote:
"For centuries the Chinese used an ancient curse: 'May you live in interesting times!'


Shocked Wink
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 08:01 am
@hamburgboy,
It's driving me nuts!
I want a result!
I want to be able to stop watching that BBC live coverage for hours on end! Wink
hamburgboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 11:56 am
@msolga,
msolga :
just for fun i've been checking the BBC election report " as seen in australia " .
really a very thorough report !

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/nickbryant/

from the report by nick bryant :

Quote:
I've been watching the results of the British election come in from Canberra, where the British High Commission put on a breakfast at the National Press Club - which came with a mock-up of the front door of 10 Downing Street and a British bobby stationed outside. Despite scurrilous rumours that the policeman was, in fact, a "strippogram" and was about to go "Full Monty", I am glad to report that he remained fully-clothed throughout.

In those early morning hours, as David Dimbleby launched the BBC's coverage, the thing that struck me - indeed stirred me - was the sight of so many of my compatriots queuing up outside polling stations. Alas, then came the dispiriting news that many had not been allowed to cast their ballots.

My mind was cast back to the 2000 American presidential election, which I had the good fortune to cover, when polling stations in the richest nation on the planet looked more like a banana republic - the site of scenes of anger and dismay in Florida, most notably, which quickly ended up in court. The scenes from Britain looked more like one of our great exports: a period drama. People are already wondering why the mechanics of British elections look like they come from the Industrial Revolution rather than the digital age.
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 05:17 pm
Good evening, one and all. I went to bed and awoke this morning to find that they had indeed hung the Parliament.
I see that some 28 seats had been won by parties other than the Big 3. The Tories are 20 shy but I guess there is no no chance of getting much of anything by working that angle. So it comes down to Nick Clegg and the Lib Dems.
He has kept Gordon Brown sitting on his doorstep, hat in hand, while he goes out partying with David Cameron. They will whoop it up, but I just can't see them hopping into bed together on such divisive issues like proportional representation.
Clegg will, I think, give Labour his support. But I suspect Brown will not end up as PM. He is damaged goods.
British financial markets will want a resolution to this by Monday.
That is the way I see it from here, but what do I know.
Pundits in the US are drawing parallels to the political parties here, where there is a possibility of the Republican Party fracturing. Could we end up with 3 parties? I think I doubt it.
hamburgboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 05:36 pm
@realjohnboy,
Quote:
Could we end up with 3 parties?


rjb ,
i'm sure you remember " what's his name " ( ross perrot ) .
he brought some exitement into the u.s. election - imo .
i still see him on one of his many appearances on the larry king show - usually toting some charts that he would put up on an easel - gosh , it was fun to watch .

but this is about the british election - so where are some ( ONE ? ) of the british a2k's ?
hope they'll give us some insight scoop .

the lib-dem sure are the ones being courted - but they don't like " first-past-the post " ( i don't really like it either ) - and i don't think that either the conservatives or labour will go along with them .

btw the queen is still in windsor - she isn't needed in london yet , i understand .

..............................................................................

CALLING ALL BRITS ... ...
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 05:45 pm
@hamburgboy,
hamburgboy wrote:



the lib-dem sure are the ones being courted - but they don't like " first-past-the post " ( i don't really like it either ) - and i don't think that either the conservatives or labour will go along with them .
[/quote]

What is the alternative to Clegg being the deal-maker? (Sorry for messing up the format to your quote).
hamburgboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 06:01 pm
@realjohnboy,
a/t wiki , another election usually followed a " hung one " in the past - but would it change anything ???

don't the british sometimes " muddle through " these things ?

i have no idea what might happen , but am sure that " midnight oil " is burning .

( all reminds me somewhat of the brit tv-series " yes , minister " and " yes , prime minister " . )

will the politicos all have to be nice to each other ?

( btw canada's parliament is a " hung one " , since the conservatives do not have a majority - but keep getting re-elected . there are four parties represented in canada's parliament - and it doesn'y work too badly .
of course , the government can't " ram through " any new legislation - which isn't such a bad thing imo . )

almost forgot the link to wiki :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hung_parliament
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2010 06:24 pm
Following along. I had been surprised, I was expecting the lib dems to get more votes via all the press folderol in the lead up.
 

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