Eva
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 12:50 pm
Thanks for the FairVote link, Thomas! It's very interesting to see all the differences between states.
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  5  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 08:33 pm
I grew up in a relatively politized family. Both my parents were nationalist anti-imperialist (populists Latin American style) and my mother was very close to the Cuban activists who fought Batista and made the Revolution. My first stamp album was of great moments of the Cuban Revolution when me and my mom visited Cuba, and, at age 5, I had my miliciano costume.
Then Castro turn to Marxism and my mother turned away from him. My father's move away was slower and never finished.
Around 1962, several Cuban refugee kids turned up in my school, and I was told to befriend them. Once I told them about a new Cuban boy's name and I was forbid even to talk to him: "His father is an assasin for the dictator Batista", I was told. Very confusing things for a child.
But as a whole, politics was something my parents were interested in, not me. I was interested in football (soccer) and baseball and comic books.
Then I was sent to the US, to study English. The Vietnam war was going on (and I had Cuban cousins fighting in both sides), the racial tension was easily felt, and the generation gap was there. The times they were a'changing. We had a party when some of the older kids burned their draft cards, I broke Tex's elbow after some racist remarks against "nggers" and I noticed there was much to admire (freedom and democratic institutions, first of all) and many things to despise about the US (warmongering, lust for money). This is a crucial part of politization.
When I came back to Mexico, it felt so much like a prison! One party, one voice in the media, so many prohibitions! An island seemingly untouched by the rest of the world.
But that was false! The young were moving there, too. Banging the table and saying "I am fed up of all your moralizing!, I like rock music and long hair, and freedom, and would like to live in a country that is a true part of the world, not a freaking untouched island!". This was what the student movement of 1968 was really about: get the police ouyt of our lives!
My participation was minimal, since I was only 14 (go to a march, distribute leaflets) and the movement was crushed in blood on October 2nd. A revolution had to be made (after the Olympic games, mind you!).
So it was then when I really was born politically... became a rebellious -yet studious- teenager, a radical (but not extremist) left winger as a youth, a political organizer in my young adult years, a political cadre. Then my left-wing leanings faded a bit. Since 1987 I don't belong to any political party.


msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 08:43 pm
@fbaezer,
Hello, fbaezer. (I was hoping you'd turn up! Smile )
Great post.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 09:58 pm
@Seed,
Interesting, Seed. You've got your views, but they're a private thing:

Quote:
...I think I keep my political views to myself because there are far enough people out there shouting and screaming over it all that I would rather not cloud the air any more and keep those who are confused from hearing one more voice to further there confusion.


Good post. I enjoyed reading what you had to say & found it very interesting, too.
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 10:18 pm
@fbaezer,
Fascinating post.

What interesting times you've lived through! I suppose I could say the same for myself. I think many of us who are 50 and older had no choice but to become politicized, given the times we've lived through.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Feb, 2010 07:13 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:
Setanta wrote:
So, you know for a fact that New Jersey requires registration by party affiliation?

What do you mean by "requires registration by party affiliation"? That registering as an Independent is not an option? You can register as an Independent in New Jersey.


No, that wasn't the point. In some states, you just register to vote, period, and without reference to affiliation. If you want to vote in a primary such a state, you get a ballot for one of the parties participating in the primary, or, alternatively, you are directed to the appropriate voting machine.

So my question was whether or not there was an affiliation requirement to register to vote in New Joisey.
Eorl
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 04:42 am
This isn't an easy question, as I think of myself as politically naive. I struggle so hard to see every side of every situation that I rarely come to firm position on anything.

If I had to identify one nodal point it would be reading "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee. Another one would be Barry B Longyear's "Sea of Glass".

I definately identify as a humanist, I strongly advocate for individual freedom but (there's always a but) I understand how and why the basic conservatism of the majority needs to curtail that. I lean toward Ayn Rand in a philosophical way while right wing capitalism looks much more closely aligned to Darwinian human nature, and is therefore more practical.

0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  3  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2010 01:01 pm
@msolga,
Nice to be back...I was lured by the new "following" feature. If I can figure out how to use it, I'll hopefully be back more often.

My parents were Yellow Dog Democrats, and my first political memory was workiing the phones in the Dem headquarters for an upcoming election. My house was a heady environment for politicos when I was a little girl...we have local politicians visiting frequently, and dinner table convo was an intersting mix of issues, people and political action. My parents did make the jump to the GOP with the Reagan Democrats, as did I: an antidote to Carter's malaise... I continued following on my own. I discovered an intrinsic liberal worldview as relates to social issues, but remained a bit more conservative on structure, though even that stance has evolved during my education.

Good question, Olga...and greetings.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2010 03:28 pm
@Lash,
And my greetings back to you, Lash!
Very nice to see you around these parts again.
Interesting post. Thank you.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2010 11:21 pm
@Lash,
Where did you grow up and experience all this Lash?
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2010 11:31 pm
@georgeob1,
South Georgia, George. My uncle was actually the mayor for three terms...and my dad ran unsuccessfully for some office I can't remember as we speak... My dad escorted Hugh Gillis' wife to some event for him... laughing...trying to remember what office Gillis was occupying at the time.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2010 11:36 pm
@Lash,
http://www.legis.state.ga.us/legis/2001_ss/senate/gass20.htm

This guy was I guess the most renowned guy, but there were many more of "lesser stature," who frequented our home. The family was loaded with politicians.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2010 11:42 pm
@dyslexia,
LOL!!!
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2010 07:18 am
This is a great question. I was up too late last night to answer it at the moment, but soon.

Joe(I know y'all can't wait.)Nation Cool
Lash
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2010 07:28 am
@Joe Nation,
(starts chanting, "Joe, Joe, Joe..." ) Looking forward.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2010 11:54 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
So my question was whether or not there was an affiliation requirement to register to vote in New Joisey.

There is a requirement to register before you can vote; you will either register as a party affiliate or as an Independent.
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2010 12:40 pm
@Thomas,
There is probably an option to choose 'no party affiliation' if you wish. At least, there is in most states at the time of registration.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2010 12:44 pm
@Thomas,
I think it's important to register to a particular party if one wants to vote during the primary election. Some states like Massachusetts (if memory serves me correctly) and New York have this requirement for participation in the primaries.

It's a protection that keeps say a boat load of Republicans from sabotaging the Democratic Primary by voting in the least likely candidate to win the general election and vice versa.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2010 12:58 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

It's a protection that keeps say a boat load of Republicans from sabotaging the Democratic Primary by voting in the least likely candidate to win the general election and vice versa.


why can't they do that anyway, simply by registering for the other party
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2010 03:15 pm
@Joe Nation,
Quote:
I was up too late last night to answer it at the moment, but soon.


Well I really hope you do, Joe. I'd be very interested to hear what you have to say.

I also would've like to have read what say, nimh, dag, & .....quite a few others (!) might've had to say. But ya can't twist peoples' arms & make them post, can you? (but you sure can give it a go!) Wink

0 Replies
 
 

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