26
   

Do Atheists favour Buddism over the other faiths?

 
 
sullyfish6
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 06:04 pm
And everything he has said about Buddhism is not true.
He has misinterpreted all the tenets.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 06:14 pm
@sullyfish6,
Who has, do you mean, Setanta? I get Set's points.

If I would go anywhere towards religion I'd check out buddhism. I did and wasn't interested. This doesn't mean I shun all buddhists.
0 Replies
 
sullyfish6
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 06:23 pm
"I did and wasn't interested"

lol

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 06:33 pm
@sullyfish6,
mmm? I appreciate some good people involved with buddhism, we are just different.

I am really odd (as most of you know). I hate constructs re spirituality, including my childhood religion, catholicism - but also what I take as boats into the land of foo foo. Hate may be the wrong word, let's say distrust.
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 10:36 pm
@ossobuco,
Yes, Bhuddism is one of those religions more or less compatible with atheism.
Secular Judaism is another.

(not directed at you osso, meant to ReplyAll)
0 Replies
 
Eorl
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 11:06 pm
@sullyfish6,
sullyfish6 wrote:


All you have to do is look at nature and you can't help but believe in something.



All you have to do is look at nature superficially, and then jump to ridiculous conclusions.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 11:12 pm
@sullyfish6,
Bullshit. Reincarnation and karma are prime examples of superstition. It is really rather hilarious to have this from someone who claims that all one need do to believe in a god is to look at nature.
oolongteasup
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 12:53 am
@dyslexia,
Quote:
they are wallowing, luxuriating, in a most enormous vanity


yeppers

agreed but

spose that means i still cant borrow the hat huh
0 Replies
 
sullyfish6
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 02:17 pm
Both of these words have taken on a New Age definition that does not follow Buddhist teachings. Nirvana is another one.

Karma really means "action"'

"Transition" is used, not reincarnation. From compost comes the flower, only to return (transition) to it again.

"Nirvana" means living in the present.
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Feb, 2010 11:45 am
@sullyfish6,
I think that the "purists" forms of Buddhissm are essentially atheistic (or at least non-theistic). And the concepts of Karma and Reincarnation are essentially Hindu both in origin and in essence.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Feb, 2010 12:05 pm
@JLNobody,
I think JLNobody is one of fn not the most kindly humanistic people I've ever met (even if he is a Buddhist).
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Feb, 2010 12:08 pm
@dyslexia,
Me too.
0 Replies
 
coluber2001
 
  2  
Reply Wed 10 Feb, 2010 12:39 pm
Of course Buddhism has its various sects as well, from the fundamentalist Theravada, to the more cosmopolitan Mayahana, to the mystical Zen sect. I think Zen brings religion from the objective to the subjective, God as perception and experience rather than an object. God as perception cannot be talked about, so they don't, but that doesn't mean they're athiests; athiests are fundamentalists reacting to to a literal interpretation of a god with an objective reality.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Feb, 2010 10:32 pm
I am inclined toward Buddhism, but the meditative sort, not that which the asian masses practices with its quasi-theistic bent, miracles, demons, merit, reincarnation, karma, etc. I find no conflict between my meditation practices and my atheism. But I must stress that I do not believe in a No-God and worship him as do atheists of the Madeline Ohara sort. The fundamentalist notion of God--and supernaturalism in general--make no sense to me, so I simply ignore it.
See what you've done LittleK?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Feb, 2010 10:56 pm
@JLNobody,
Me either.

So it goes.
0 Replies
 
Sglass
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Mar, 2010 06:39 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta, I would just adore it if you share your knowledge of Buddhist supertitions with me.
echi
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2010 12:14 am
I'm atheist, and I like Buddhism a lot. I don't find anything superstitious about it, but one could if so inclined, of course. It's all a matter of interpretation.
0 Replies
 
echi
 
  0  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2010 12:27 am
@Sglass,
Maybe after that he can give us a lesson on dickishness.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 May, 2010 10:36 am
The recent commercial popularity of the "proselytizing athiests" (e.g., Hitchens, Dawkins, Wright), while greatly preferrable to the bizzare Madeline O'hare (sp?), reflects their willingness to oversimply the issues. The reality is more nuanced. At least that's the view of this atheist.
Buddhism is atheistic insofar as it is not theistic. My objection to Tibetan Buddhism is that it is a theocracy. I follow a version of Buddhism that is fundamentally apolitical, and uncommitted to notions of Karma and Reincarnation.
0 Replies
 
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 May, 2010 01:32 am
@dyslexia,
Quote:
In my view, the Oriental religions are no better than Christianity (itself of Oriental origin, of course) or Islam; all of them tend to divorce men and women from the earth, from other forms of life, by their mystical emphasis upon the general, the abstract, the invisible, and by their psychological tendency, in prayer and meditation, to turn the mind inward, toward self-love, self-importance, self-obsession. Salvation. Satori. Union with God, union with the All-Source, union with The One. (Which one? ) Of course, the devotees of these mystical rites claim the opposite"that they are engaged in self-transcendence. I think they delude themselves; rather than escaping the self, they are wallowing, luxuriating, in a most enormous vanity.


I'd say that every single one of us has any number of delusions that we cling to.

As for the claim that looking inwards = enormous vanity - my thought is that you can only say that if you've never done that enough to know who you are at a deep level...I found that doing so brings greater acceptance of the world, peoples imperfections, my own imperfections, faults and weaknesses. I've found it leads to greater understanding of why I, and other people get angry, and leads to both calmess, and a desire to grow.

Mind you, that 'looking inwards' wasn't from any religious teaching per se (I'd say I'm agnostic), but many of the paths towards understanding yourself better have religious connections (if you read much of pyschology today, it's becoming more and more mystical)
 

Related Topics

700 Inconsistencies in the Bible - Discussion by onevoice
Why do we deliberately fool ourselves? - Discussion by coincidence
Spirituality - Question by Miller
Oneness vs. Trinity - Discussion by Arella Mae
give you chills - Discussion by Bartikus
Evidence for Evolution! - Discussion by Bartikus
Evidence of God! - Discussion by Bartikus
One World Order?! - Discussion by Bartikus
God loves us all....!? - Discussion by Bartikus
The Preambles to Our States - Discussion by Charli
 
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 11/30/2020 at 05:39:15