18
   

Oh, the weather outside AIN'T frightful . . .

 
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 07:12 am
@Setanta,
Very Happy

And pass on my greeting to the lady of the house, while you're at it, OK?
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 07:13 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
. . . i won't mention to them your obsession with catses . . .


That might be best!
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 07:14 am
@Setanta,
That's just because you want them to keep sniffing your arse.

Evil or Very Mad
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 07:24 am
@Setanta,
Ah, the dreaded "wintry mix." I never saw the phrase in MN or WI, to my recollection. But Columbus loves it some wintry mix. Bah.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 07:29 am
@sozobe,
there was wintry mix for part of my walk to the subway this morning

first a bitta sorta snow, then a bitta sorta mix, then a bitta sorta rain, then a bitta sorta mix, then I was inside the station

my hair has poofed up from exposure to wintry mix. time to find the hood for the coat
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 12:06 pm
Attempting to lull me into a false sense of security, the sun came out as i was taking the little doggies for their constitutional . . .

Miss Girl? Miss Olga says hello.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 12:21 pm
@Setanta,
Please say hello back to MsO when you next see her. Give her a hug for me.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 12:31 pm
'K . . .

Miss Olga, The Girl says hello . . . oh, and this ((((((((hug))))))))) is for you . . .
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 12:36 pm
@dlowan,
A reminder to 'Never say never' perhaps this year you ... could be lucky?

Let me suggest you read this fine work of meteorological/climate history ...
The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History, 1300-1850 by Brian M. Fagan, http://www.amazon.com/Little-Ice-Age-Climate-1300-1850/dp/0465022723

In 1816, it due to perfect or imperfect weather conditions, it snowed in the New England summer.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 03:21 pm
@tsarstepan,
We live in hope.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 07:54 pm
Snow? We dunno snow! Or hardly!

Almost snowed in Sydney once, in my lifetime - but 'twas only hail!
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 08:06 pm
@margo,
The last time there was officially measurable snow in Phoenix was 1937.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 08:13 pm
There is a possibility of snow in Houston, Friday and Saturday. Not a lot, I grant you. I'd just as soon skip that little amount.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Dec, 2009 05:25 am
@Setanta,
You two are funny. (I missed this last night.)
Thank you for passing on my message, Mr Messenger. And thank you for the hug, Ms Poofy hair. Smile

So, is it snowing, like properly, now?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Dec, 2009 05:03 am
@msolga,
Well, we had to wait a week, but, yes, it's snowing now. Whether or not one would call it proper, i'd not be willing to say. It's a nasty, wet, "a degree warmer and this would be rain" kind of snow. My first shovel-full, the handle began to tremble so i quickly put it back down, and shook about half the snow off, then proceeded carefully with regard to how much snow i picked up. It's the kind of wet, heavy snow that could snap the handle of the shovel. The temperature is low, too, near freezing, and with a nasty high wind. This is the kind of snow that kills middle-aged men who go out to shovel. I took it easy.

The weather outside today sure as hell is frightful . . .
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Dec, 2009 05:10 am
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:
In 1816, it due to perfect or imperfect weather conditions, it snowed in the New England summer.


Whoever wrote your climate history hardly seems competent. I suspect it was by a journalist, and not by either a scientist or an historian. A volcano in what is now Indonesia (then the Dutch East Indies) erupted explosively, ejecting the top 6,000 feet of the mountain into the upper atmosphere--Tamboro in 1815. The period 1812-17 was a particularly active one for volcanoes, but Tamboro was the worst. Most historians use the term "the year without summer" to describe 1816. Google "the year without summer," and you'll learn all about it. The omission of the cause for that effect on the part of your author makes me suspect he doesn't really have a clue.
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Dec, 2009 07:35 am
Quote:
Oh, the weather outside AIN'T frightful . . .

It's frightful now.

6'-10' of snow, sleet and freezing rain for New Hampshire.

Weird how fast it went from being 55deg and sunny in November to nasty old winter.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Dec, 2009 07:52 am
Surely you don't mean six to ten feet . . . not yet, anyway.

It has turned into freezing rain here.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Dec, 2009 07:54 am
@Setanta,
looks like the south of the province is gonna dodge this early storm like bullet
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Dec, 2009 07:57 am
Well over a foot and still coming down heavy in southern WI. Will have to go out in the midst of it to knock snow off the cable, before we get these 40 mph wind gusts they're forecasting for the afternoon.
0 Replies
 
 

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