2
   

The "new" Beanie Baby

 
 
Reply Sat 24 Oct, 2009 05:49 pm
Here you go - grab 'em up if you can find 'em.
All sold out at the store.
(just got back from 9 year old granddaughter's birthday party where all the girls were crazy about these Zyu Zyus.)

And they are NOT cheap.

http://www.smarthamsterpets.com/?gclid=CPiLnPPu1p0CFRHxDAodYn_trw
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 2,019 • Replies: 14
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Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Oct, 2009 07:20 pm
@sullyfish6,
I saw a Toys-R-Us flyer that had them for something like $10. Why are they so expensive on Amazon?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Oct, 2009 11:22 am
@sullyfish6,
Ive heard of people who sunk their retirement into beanie babies and Star Trek toys and have taken a huge hit as the market for all collectables has tanked
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Oct, 2009 11:34 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Ive heard of people who sunk their retirement into beanie babies and Star Trek toys
and have taken a huge hit as the market for all collectables has tanked
Not "ALL" collectibles: the market for submachineguns only increases in value.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Oct, 2009 04:19 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
I really dont consider a quality weapon a collectible. Weapons, like fine antiques and fine art, have a fairly predictable rate of appreciation ( I suppose even machine guns) The LAncaster and "Kentucky" rifles of the 18th century, (if they hadnt been converted to capocks) are worth more and more each year, despite recessions and tough times. .

To me," Collectibles" are chochkies, usually anything from, toys, baseball cards, sports memorabilia, Beany Baby and CAbbage PAtch dolls, Star Trek plastic toys, and commemorative plates and coins (non legal tender coins). The market for all this crap has tanked . It s6tarted with baseball cards. The collectors of baseball cards would have you believe that the market is still strong when its declined by one order of magnitude.

I do some antique "Picking" for several dealers and Im amazed at how the Depression glass people and the LLadro collectors are running around trying to unload their junk so they dont take a really big hit.

WVen high end stuff sometimes tanks because the stuff was previously "run up" by several notable collectors. This happened in the 1990's when Bill Csoby, Oprah, Barbara STreisand, and PAul Newmans wife were collecting "SHAKER" furniture. I had several shaker dovetailed and painted circular boxes, which I sold for about 500$ each. Yoday they are worth at auction, maybe 90$. Same thing with the great shaker fruniture pieces from the great sites like HAncock MA, Mt LEbanon NY, and a few others.These pieces were going for the hundreds of thousands. Only to crash by 10 times in the late 90's.

TIMING.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Oct, 2009 09:32 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

I really dont consider a quality weapon a collectible. Weapons, like fine antiques and fine art, have a fairly predictable rate of appreciation ( I suppose even machine guns) The LAncaster and "Kentucky" rifles of the 18th century, (if they hadnt been converted to capocks) are worth more and more each year, despite recessions and tough times. .

To me," Collectibles" are chochkies, usually anything from, toys, baseball cards, sports memorabilia, Beany Baby and CAbbage PAtch dolls, Star Trek plastic toys, and commemorative plates and coins (non legal tender coins). The market for all this crap has tanked . It s6tarted with baseball cards. The collectors of baseball cards would have you believe that the market is still strong when its declined by one order of magnitude.

I do some antique "Picking" for several dealers and Im amazed at how the Depression glass people and the LLadro collectors are running around trying to unload their junk so they dont take a really big hit.

WVen high end stuff sometimes tanks because the stuff was previously "run up" by several notable collectors. This happened in the 1990's when Bill Csoby, Oprah, Barbara STreisand, and PAul Newmans wife were collecting "SHAKER" furniture. I had several shaker dovetailed and painted circular boxes, which I sold for about 500$ each. Yoday they are worth at auction, maybe 90$. Same thing with the great shaker fruniture pieces from the great sites like HAncock MA, Mt LEbanon NY, and a few others. These pieces were going for the hundreds of thousands. Only to crash by 10 times in the late 90's.

TIMING.
I collected out of love, joy, beauty, historical nostalgia and sentiment.
I was not aware that the criteria of collecting were so clearly defined.
I have in mind, guns, gold, silver n copper coins, going back to Early America
and back to the Roman Republic. I have sentimental value for a 1795 $10 Gold Piece -- the first year
of issue of any gold from the USA, in its highest denomination of issue. George Washington
picked up a feather and signed a statute authorizing Al Hamilton to mint that coin.
After gold was found in Sutter 's Mill, California in 1849,
a $20 Gold Piece was issued in 1850, so I acquired that.
Call me ideosyncratic, but when I was a law student,
reading common law cases of earlier centuries, early England,
I liked holding an ancient coin in my hand, like a link with the past,
wondering what it had gone thru.





David
Diest TKO
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2009 12:22 am

T
K
O
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2009 07:20 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Fine art, coins, etc . ANything that offers a scholarly view of an earlier time is more an object of culture rather than a mere "collectible" (or collectable" if your from Jersey). Collectibles are ephemera of recent past or pop culture . They usually have one thing that distinguishes them from true objects of CULTURE. Colectibles are usually secondary peices or are replicas of an object or events. Eg commemorative plates arent actual plates for use in homely trades whereas SGraffito Redware of the colonial period were objects of daily use.

Your coins were legal tender and not mere commemoratives. Furniture of all the historical pewriods has value as an object of culture (true antiques) whereas "decorator " pieces have a market value for a small time period. SO, in summary, a machine gun is an object or utility that, in most cases represents a pwriod in our history and, as such, will command higher values on the market. Whereas Star Wars "light sabres" have already tanked in value as the yars separate us from the initial movie event.

DONT let any "collectible whores" tell you anything different, all they are doing is trying to frantically unload their vast collections of xchochkies before they are candidates for the dumpster.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2009 08:03 am
@farmerman,

I consider myself to be safe from the "collectible whores"
in that I have not collected for purposes of speculative investment.

Rather, I collected out of love for the pieces themselves;
e.g., for the Americana of the .44 magnum Ruger SuperBlackhawk,
with its distinctive square triggerguard, or an apparent prize of war
of a 9mm German Luger P-'08 stamped "1940" whose provenance I know not.

I have never intended to sell any part of the collections,
nor have I done so.





David
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2009 09:31 am
@OmSigDAVID,
most collectors do so out of a deep involvement with something intrinsic about their items of choice. I collect arts and crafts pottery,Indian points, ceartain types of fine art, and Pa German blanket chests.
I say that Illnever part with these items but I can never say never. Besides, I will die and at some point prior to that, I hope to find good caring homes for these objects.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2009 09:57 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

most collectors do so out of a deep involvement with something intrinsic about their items of choice.
I collect arts and crafts pottery,Indian points, ceartain types of fine art, and Pa German blanket chests.
I say that Illnever part with these items but I can never say never. Besides, I will die and at some point prior to that,

I hope to find good caring homes for these objects.
U raise a good point.
If I may inquire, what moved u to collect Pa German blanket chests ?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2009 10:49 am
@OmSigDAVID,
The workman ship and the decoration. We have over 30 chests now and many are at a public museum on temporary loan. (Collecting something big has its drawbacks unless you own a castle)

Our home is over 250 years old and a feature about these early homes is LACK OF CLOSETS. Blankets chests and "Schranks" various cupboards and highboys were all necessary storage units so that crap wasnt all over the floors and tables.

In 1976 a book was published by the PA German Society by A Fabian. It was "The Pa German Decorated Chest" I bought 2 copies, one to use and one to lay by as a "collectible sourcebook". I fell in love with these things and so did my wife .
By reverse osmosis, my wife was an art major working on her MFA and she was doing illustrations of American Pottery. She fell in love with Newcomb College arts and crafts , so she infected ME with that disease. We have a sizaeable collection of Newcomb that weve had to store most of it in a large safety deposit vault because we leave home for extended periods and Id hate to have the stuff stolen, nd, to us, its irreplaceable.



farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2009 10:51 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
I hope to find good caring homes for these objects.
TO WHICH DAVID RESPONDED
U raise a good point


I was told by a famous Pa Dutch obje's collector, the Robacher husband and wife

"We never own anything, we are caretakers for a time"
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2009 10:57 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

She fell in love with Newcomb College arts and crafts , so she infected ME with that disease. We have a sizaeable collection of Newcomb


Oooooooohhh....!
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2009 02:51 pm
@sozobe,
We havent bought anything of that label for about 10 years cause the market has gone out of sight and I dont think we could afford some of the prices nowadays. We collected when we lived in NAWLINS and one copuld buy the stuff for 250$ to no more than 3000$ for the most outstanding stuff. Today, the latest piece of Newcomb went in the Cinncinatti Arts and Crafts gallery for 178,000$ for one 12" vase decorated by Sadie Irvine.

Shocked Shocked Shocked
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