16
   

Metal Roofs pros & con s

 
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Tue 22 Sep, 2009 08:52 am
@aidan,
Yea, I object to a metal roof on a Victorian. My house is a bungalow. I think the standing seam roof will go quite nicely. Re: the noise: It rained during the night last night so I made a point to listen to the sound. It was quite loud, as it was raining really hard. I am a little concerned that a metal roof would be even louder. Would more insulation help that?
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Tue 22 Sep, 2009 09:22 am
@Swimpy,
Did you know that you can get a metal roof that looks like shingles?

http://www.newenglandmetalroof.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/steel-shingle-roof.jpg

Our neighbours did this because she didn't want her house to "look like a barn".

Our schoolhouse has a metal roof and I'm convinced that it's the only reason the building is still standing (it's over 90 years old). The wood in the attic is in great shape and we've only ever had one leak -- due to old chimney caulking. It is noisier than a shingle roof but I've never noticed that the noise is deafening and the attic is uninsulated (so far -- that's another future project).
farmerman
 
  1  
Tue 22 Sep, 2009 09:23 am
@Swimpy,
You either love the sound or hate it. Sounds of rain on a metal roof are somewhat damped by insulation and a Third story but the rain on the roof goes with the territory. Out here we love it, its very much a sound that induces coziness on rainy cold days.

The rolled seam (standing seam) roofs are nowhere near the flimsiness of a metal barn roof or cabin roof. These are architechtural statements for the building. If my building had a very large roof (like an A frame) I would NOT choose a metal roof since the linearity of the seams will overpower the effect of the entire building. In that case Id choose another style and material.
Metal roofs made to look like another material are also not genuine (sort of like putting shutters on a picture window) ALWAYS do what the building wants to be. Dont force something that doesnt feel genuine to the structure. We like our metal roof cause it matches the building style and theres enough building mass to make the metal roof a nice accompaniment to the overall structure, the roof doesnt rule over everything.
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Tue 22 Sep, 2009 10:04 am
@Swimpy,
Quote:
Would more insulation help that?

I would think it would - this house my dad has with the metal roof is a log cabin out in the woods and half the house is divided into stories - a bedroom with another bedroom over it - but the other half is the kitchen /eating/ living space with a loft over half of it for sleeping but over the living and eating space - there's a cathedral ceiling, so there's absolutely nothing separating the first floor from the roof at that part of the house (if you can picture what I mean).
It's used mostly in the summer by my family - but there is a woodstove in the basement and heating vents in the floors - so I can't imagine it wouldn't be insulated in the ceiling under the roof- but I'm sure it's not insulated as much as a year round home in the midwest would be.

It's a great sound if you're on vacation - sort of how I like being in a tent when it rains on occasion- but for a year round house, I know it would get on my nerves. But again - I'm a nut about noise when I'm sleeping - even the refrigerator buzzing or the furnace running can keep me awake if I happen to tune into it.

If you found it to be what you want in every other way, but think you'd be bothered by the noise - you could always use earplugs Laughing
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Tue 22 Sep, 2009 11:51 am
@Swimpy,
One downside is that it can interfere with cell phone signals. I've found that to be a deal breaker in some places with already weak reception. The metal roof would basically render cell phones useless.

Edit: note that you can usually use a signal repeater to get around this if necessary. Basically it can capture the signal outside and "repeat" it inside.
farmerman
 
  1  
Tue 22 Sep, 2009 02:00 pm
@Robert Gentel,
My cell phone and wireless is not affected at all. QAND we live in a solid stone house.
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Tue 22 Sep, 2009 02:04 pm
@farmerman,
It probably is affected, just not enough to bother you. If the signal is strong enough it will just mean lower "bars" on your cell phone which is ultimately not a problem.
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Tue 22 Sep, 2009 04:16 pm
I used to have a weak cell phone signal in my house, but it's fine now. I think it depends on the carrier, as well. A signal repeater is an option.

I have to consider the sound issue. I'm a light sleeper and Our bedroom is on the upper level. There is no attic. We have considerable insulation in the ceiling, though. I wish I could experience a rain under a metal roof before I buy. I will ask for references and be sure to ask folks who have them what they think of the noise.
panzade
 
  1  
Tue 22 Sep, 2009 04:23 pm
@Swimpy,
*chuckle*
I used to live 100 yards from a railroad track. After a few years I couldn't go to sleep til a train came by
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  3  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 05:22 am
@Swimpy,
Thats a good isea. Put us all down for liking the sound of a metal roof. One of our additions is a high ceilinged studio for my wife. This is a large room with a fireplace at one end and a sort of nook with a couch and chairs where we sit and read or just nap whenever theres a rainstorm . Its really neat with the fireplace going and a sleet storm pinging off the roof. Since its a sammich insulted room the sound isnt deadened by three floors of house. The sound is very peaceful and natural. I think people who are bothered by natures sounds like that will be bothered by wind in the trees or the sound of a rooster or birds. Nature provides several distinct librettos , you either enjoy them or you are diturbed by them.

When I lived in New Orleans we had our first place near the JAx brewery and there was this sound of steam in the pipes as they were brewing or cleaning (I have no idea what the hell they were doin wiith steam), but like panzade, it became a background noise that botheredus only when it stopped.

Swimpy
 
  1  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 08:23 am
@farmerman,
I hear what you and Panzade are saying. I grew up next to RR trx, as well. The 10 o'clock train was my lullaby. It even rocked me to sleep. The sound of rain only wakes me because I know someone has to shut the windows and hubby can sleep though a nuclear bomb. I love to sleep during a rainstorm. I'm guessing it's been a long time since you've experienced rain under any other kind of roof. Do you remember the transition?
Swimpy
 
  1  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 08:30 am
@Tai Chi,
That's an option for me, Tai Chi, although I think they are actual metal shingles. I love the look of the standing seam roof. I don't know the difference in cost.

Here's a picture of my house:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e383/swimpy12/DSC00746.jpg

Don't you think a standing seam metal roof would look good on it?
farmerman
 
  1  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 08:38 am
@Swimpy,
Yep, the transition was intitially based on the recognition of another sound in our overall symphony (Ever hear crickets caterwalling all night?). There really wasnt any real acclimation process. We adjusted and learned to love the sound with every new rainstorm.

Theres a real feeling of coziness and security that rain on the roof imparts. I feel sadness for those who cant feel this. Its an auditory version of walking into a house where someone just baked an apple pie. The smell induces memories and feelings (in the case of apple pie). The sounds of rain on a "tin" roof does the same from an auditory sense.
I recall days at my grammas when i was a kid. She had a little shed roof summer kitchen where theyd cook on a big iron stove and there were chairs to sit around and look out the big window onto a small trellis garden. In the cool d ays of spring my cousins and I would sit and watch the birds in the trellis whenever there was a rainstorm and we were all safe and snug in our own warm little "covy" redolent with grammas cooking smells.

Maybe my imagination is just overactive and I relate things too quickly, one with another.
0 Replies
 
metalroof
 
  1  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 11:16 am
@Cycloptichorn,
You can combined a metal roof with a BIPV system... Edit [Moderator]: Link removed
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 11:27 am
@farmerman,
I get better cellphone reception here than I used to in some places in the city where high-rise buildings were a factor. I've never seen a metal roof have an adverse effect on that. Now, the combination of a metal roof and something else (whatever), might be a factor.
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 05:13 pm
@Swimpy,
Swimpy wrote:

That's an option for me, Tai Chi, although I think they are actual metal shingles. I love the look of the standing seam roof. I don't know the difference in cost.

Here's a picture of my house:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e383/swimpy12/DSC00746.jpg

Don't you think a standing seam metal roof would look good on it?


Yes, I do think a traditional metal roof would look good. When you said bungalow that's not what I was thinking. (I like your porch.)
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Sat 26 Sep, 2009 06:40 am
Estimate from the roofing guy was about 50% higher for steel. He wrote that "steel would be difficult." Don't know what he means. Haven't been able to reach him to ask. I'm guessing the skylights, but he should be able to deal with them if he knows what he's doing. Apparently he doesn't work with other metal roofs.
lobo012847
 
  1  
Mon 26 Sep, 2016 02:59 pm
@roger,
I live in Central Florida (Hurricane Territory) and have for 15 years. I have a steel roof that has stood up to "normal" hail, and winds in excess of 80 mph. The roof is 12 years old and is just fine. The edges are fastened with a glue/mastic that is about indestructible. The thing that sold me on a steel roof was seeing the roofs on houses that went through 4 hurricanes in 2014! I was a County Inspector during that period. I saw 1000s of damaged roofs (especially Tile Roofs). I saw approximately 4 damaged steel roofs -- and one of those was damaged by a falling tree! There are steel roofs on houses in this area that have been on the houses for 50 years or more!! A steel roof is more expensive, but you will never have to replace it (unless a tree falls on it), and they are energy efficient! Just purchase a good quality roof. As with anything there are cheap junk versions out there!
0 Replies
 
lobo012847
 
  1  
Mon 26 Sep, 2016 03:01 pm
@Tai Chi,
VERY PRICEY, but nice!
0 Replies
 
lobo012847
 
  1  
Mon 26 Sep, 2016 03:04 pm
@Swimpy,
Yes, the steel roof is about 50% higher, but you replace a asphalt shingle roof every 10 to 20 years depending on the area. A steel roof lasts 50 years or more. HOWEVER, get an EXPERIENCED installation man! I can't stress that enough!
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Poo-tee-weet? - Question by boomerang
Let's just rename them "Rapeublicans" - Discussion by DrewDad
Which wood laminate flooring? - Question by Buffalo
Buying a new entry door - Question by sozobe
Need water help - Question by richierich
Lifesource Water versus a 'salt' system - Discussion by USBound
Rainsoft - Discussion by richb1
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.05 seconds on 09/23/2021 at 01:15:47