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Vaccine Court

 
 
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2009 10:03 pm
Yet another vaccination = autism case.

http://www.facebook.com/ext/share.php?sid=52896963405&h=69GjZ&u=eAXnG


I hope parents begin to really look at what it TRULY is that they are putting in side their children in 'hopes' that they wont catch a disease. No, Im not talking about some odd ball, tinfoil wearing, underground conspiracy theory.
Im talking about -mercury ( heavy metals are in high concentrations in the brain of alzheimers patients for example..)
-formaldehyde,
-sorbitol ( wtf for? ) Sorbitol - Diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy is related to excess sorbitol in the cells of the eyes and nerves...... Now please dont give me that " in moderation everything is safe" line.. Sorbitol is in everything , including your toothpaste.
-Thimerosal- by weight, is 50 percent mercury, ( oh gee.. there is that mercury again)which has been linked to most learning disabilities, Autism included.

and a TON of other things most knowing parents dont even allow their children to EAT... but.. you stick it in their arm?
Im not sure people really know what they are choosing to do when they think they are being safe with their children and it is truly sad.

I could go on and on, but I know I am pissing uphill in a windstorm.



 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2009 10:31 pm
@shewolfnm,
Oh, shitapoo, shewolf. Please read more widely.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2009 10:33 pm
@shewolfnm,
Shewolf, if you believe everything you read on Facebook, I have a credit default swap I'd like to sell you.
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2009 10:44 pm
SW, you know I'm very interested in alternative healing and skeptical of the drug companies, but the link between autism and vaccinations is just not there. The science is good that modern vaccines are safe. I think autism can be triggered by environmental and genetic catalysts, but vaccines are not the problem. A bigger problem is children not getting the vaccines and then contracting diseases like measles or polio. If Jillian has never had vaccinations she must never travel to countries like India or Africa - it would be too dangerous for her.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2009 10:49 pm
@shewolfnm,
Interesting that the progenitor of this stuff has been named as falsifying data.

there's a thread on it here somewhere.
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 12:56 am
@dlowan,
This is not about the guy who falsified his research results - but it does explain how/why autism may occur- and actually offers hope for treatment.
Quote:
From The Times
July 10, 2008
Autism breakthrough as study identifies genetic defect link
Mark Henderson, Science Editor

Many cases of autism are caused by genetic defects that disrupt the brain's ability to learn, according to groundbreaking research that promises to lead to new therapies.

A set of six genes that are strongly linked to brain development in the first year of life have been found to be abnormal in many autistic children, suggesting a neurological pathway that may underlie a significant proportion of cases.

The findings are particularly significant because some of these genes are not deleted entirely in autistic children, but are kept switched off by mutations in surrounding control regions of their DNA.

This raises the prospect that critical genes could be activated by drugs or behavioural and educational therapies, so that their brains develop more normally.


“We would not need to replace the gene, if we could only figure out how to reactivate it, perhaps with medications,” said Eric Morrow, who led the research team with his Harvard University colleague Christopher Walsh.

Such genes could also be activated by environmental factors, such as specialised education programmes, and it may ultimately even be possible to use genetic tests to determine which approach will work best for individual children.

Dr Walsh said: “By being able to characterise more about the genetic mutations at work in various forms of autism, we may be able to predict which kids need gene therapy, and which just need some form of training.”

Autism is a developmental disorder that is diagnosed in up to one in 100 children, and has a triad of symptoms. People who are affected have impaired social and communication skills, and show restricted or repetitive behaviour.

The condition has long been known to be heavily influenced by genetics, from twin and family studies, but few genes have been definitively associated. Most cases are thought to be influenced by combinations of dozens of defective genes, or by rare spontaneous mutations.

It also occurs on a spectrum, ranging from high-functioning forms such as Asperger's syndrome to highly disabling conditions. Dr Walsh likened it to Leo Tolstoy's line in Anna Karenina, that: “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”

Research into autism genetics has been hampered by the difficulty of finding autistic and non-autistic siblings in the same family to study. To get around this, the new study investigated 88 families from the Middle East, Turkey and Pakistan, where the average number of children is much larger than in Europe and America. The scientists also concentrated on families in which the mother and father were cousins, which is a risk factor for autism.

In five families, they found large segments of the genome were missing. Non-autistic members still had one working copy of these regions, but those with autism lacked working copies altogether.

Most of the deletions were in sections of DNA that switch other genes on and off, and affected genes that are important in the developing brain. They appear to be vital to the process by which brain connections known as synapses become modified during the first year of life, influenced by exposure to the outside world.

Details of the research are published in the journal Science. Dr Walsh said: “Autism symptoms emerge at an age when the developing brain is refining the connections between neurons in response to a child's experience. Whether or not certain important genes turn on is thus dependent on experience-triggered neural activity. Disruption of this refinement process may be a common mechanism of autism-associated mutations.”

The work suggests that many genes, some yet unidentified, that contribute to this early learning process may be involved in autism.

Michael Greenberg, another member of the Harvard team, said: “Taken together, our findings suggest that experience-dependent learning could be relevant to autism, and that autism might result from any one of a number of genes that are part of the same signalling pathway.”

Thomas Insel, director of the US National Institute of Mental Health, which funded the research, said: “The emerging picture of the genetics of autism is quite surprising. There appear to be many separate mutations involved, with each family having a different genetic cause.

“The one unifying observation from this new report is that all of the relevant mutations could disrupt the formation of vital neural connections during a critical period when experience is shaping the developing brain.”

Clarence Schutt, of the Nancy Lurie Marks Family Foundation, another funder, said: “This publication a big event in the world of autism research.”
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 06:20 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:

Shewolf, if you believe everything you read on Facebook, I have a credit default swap I'd like to sell you.


How much do you want?

I did NOT read this entire article.. I have had a long discussion about this though and a friend of mine said " hey check this one out" ... Of course, I just kept chatting with her about it.. never read it








I have a friend in Nigeria.. he wants to borrow money too. He is genuine.
Very nice man.........
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 06:30 am
@Green Witch,
My feet taste wonderful this morning.. Embarrassed

but.. Im not a person to dismiss that link. Not when it is so """possible"""
I say that carefully mind you.. because I do know it is not set in stone , it is not completely proven...but..but..but..

My friend has an autistic boy.
Long story.. but the basics of it..
His autism got worse when he got his shots. Putting more time then necessary between those shots.. he was... almost 'healed' if that makes sense
Does this prove a thing? Nope. Not at all. ( and yes there is a ton more to the story. Im grazing over it...)

Unfortunately, I am not going to get into my personal views or opinions or even decisions about those things.. Parents tend to get holier than thou about that issue and even they dont know what is in those things.

There are shots you can request, and some times pay for, that are thermasol, mercury and formaldehyde,PPV ( what ever that is) and something else.. I dont remember... free.
Funny.. when you request those, you have to be listed with the local health department..

patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 06:33 am
@Green Witch,
Only sissygirls are afraid of measles and polio.

And mumps.

And diphtheria.

I, for one, would welcome a return of these diseases.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 06:42 am
@shewolfnm,
shewolfnm wrote:
Unfortunately, I am not going to get into my personal views or opinions or even decisions about those things.. Parents tend to get holier than thou about that issue and even they dont know what is in those things.


The first four people to reply here aren't parents...
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 06:43 am
@sozobe,
Found the falsified-data thread:

http://able2know.org/topic/129234-1
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 07:43 am
@shewolfnm,
shewolfnm wrote:
Unfortunately, I am not going to get into my personal views or opinions or even decisions about those things.. Parents tend to get holier than thou about that issue and even they dont know what is in those things.

You don't need to. This is not a question of personal views. There is extensive research on the real and potential side effects of vaccinations, including autism. There also is extensive research on how neglecting to vaccinate your child affects her chances of catching the disease you failed to vaccinate her against. The balance of risks easy to assess. It is not a matter of "he says, she says", or of "being holier than you".

Sure, you alone decide what you do with this. But whatever your final decision, your have a responsibility as a parent to make it according to the best information available. It's irresponsible to act on some long-debunked urban legend on Facebook instead.

As Ossobuco says: You need to read more widely.
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 07:57 am
@shewolfnm,
We all end up tasting our feet at some point.

It's also difficult to find out the truth about many of these things. So much information contradicts. I think the vaccine connection was a valid idea, but it didn't pan out. The additives that you mention were removed years ago from vaccines, but Autism continues to rise. Personally, I don't think we know what is the cause is and why it often appears in geographical clusters. In the meantime, I wouldn't fear vaccinations for children.
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 08:00 am
@patiodog,
You forgot smallpox.

I'm actually not sure if you are kidding or not. I know there is a lot of debate on whether we do more harm than good by suppressing these illnesses. I know most of these diseases first reck havoc on a population and then play themselves out - leaving a society stronger for the experience. Jared Diamond talks about this in his book Guns, Germs & Steel.
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 08:00 am
I agree that a lot parents just take the word of the doctor when it comes to their kids and just get the vacs "because". Some are necessary, IMO. Some, like Hepititis D...or E...or one of those (I am a little frosty today because I am taking a pretty potent cough syrup)...is not necessary and I refused it. You just need to educate yourself prior and remember that the doctors are still people and not Gods who know everything.

shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 08:01 am
@Green Witch,
Green Witch wrote:

The additives that you mention were removed years ago from vaccines,


Actually.. no they were not.
I had to specifically request the ones with out.
And.. in order to get them, we had to be registered with the health department.
Which makes no sense to me. if it is a vaccine.. and it 'works' why do I have to register when I request a safer version?
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 08:02 am
@Bella Dea,
Also remember that doctors are given very juicy incentives by drug companies to push certain products. Write so many prescriptions and win a free trip to Hawaii is common. I think Dermatologists get the most perks.
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 08:04 am
@shewolfnm,
This may be a state issue. In my area the additive free vaccines where a big thing a few years ago, but now it's standard.
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 08:04 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:

The balance of risks easy to assess. It is not a matter of "he says, she says", or of "being holier than you".


No. it isnt. I absolutely agree.
But when you are on the side of the fence that I am, and you discuss picking apart vaccines and why you chose to do so with other parents, trust me, it turns into a heated debate no matter what you bring to the table.

it is almost like politics.. Laughing
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 08:07 am
@Green Witch,
That is probably the case.

A few friends of mine in other states did not have to register with the health dept as I did when they requested different shots.... Nor did they have to ask for the thermasol free stuff...
0 Replies
 
 

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