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Wakefield, who linked Autism to vaccines, falsified data

 
 
DrewDad
 
Reply Thu 12 Feb, 2009 11:25 am
MMR doctor Andrew Wakefield fixed data on autism

Quote:
THE doctor who sparked the scare over the safety of the MMR vaccine for children changed and misreported results in his research, creating the appearance of a possible link with autism, a Sunday Times investigation has found.

Confidential medical documents and interviews with witnesses have established that Andrew Wakefield manipulated patients’ data, which triggered fears that the MMR triple vaccine to protect against measles, mumps and rubella was linked to the condition.

The research was published in February 1998 in an article in The Lancet medical journal. It claimed that the families of eight out of 12 children attending a routine clinic at the hospital had blamed MMR for their autism, and said that problems came on within days of the jab. The team also claimed to have discovered a new inflammatory bowel disease underlying the children’s conditions.

However, our investigation, confirmed by evidence presented to the General Medical Council (GMC), reveals that: In most of the 12 cases, the children’s ailments as described in The Lancet were different from their hospital and GP records. Although the research paper claimed that problems came on within days of the jab, in only one case did medical records suggest this was true, and in many of the cases medical concerns had been raised before the children were vaccinated. Hospital pathologists, looking for inflammatory bowel disease, reported in the majority of cases that the gut was normal. This was then reviewed and the Lancet paper showed them as abnormal.

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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 1,893 • Replies: 10
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sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Feb, 2009 11:54 am
@DrewDad,
There ya go.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Feb, 2009 02:38 pm
@DrewDad,
Goddam bastard!!!
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Feb, 2009 02:49 pm
Court Says Vaccine Not to Blame for Autism

Quote:
In a blow to the movement arguing that vaccines trigger autism, three Federal judges ruled Thursday against all three families in three test cases, all of whom had sought compensation from the Federal vaccine-injury fund.

Both sides in the debate have been awaiting decisions in these cases since hearings began in early 2007; more than 5,000 similar claims have been filed with the fund.

These three decisions, each looking into a different theory as to how vaccines might have injured the children, are expected to guide the outcomes of all those claims.

The judges ruled that the families seeking compensation had not shown that their children’s autism was brought on by the presence of thimerosal, a mercury vaccine preservative, by the weakened measles virus used in the measles/mumps/rubella vaccine, or by a combination of the two.
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0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Feb, 2009 04:13 pm
So what possibly could have been this clown's motive? To make a name for himself?
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 07:32 am
@Setanta,
He probably believes that there is a link (or had proposed a link), data didn't bear it out, and he fudged the data to promote his agenda and/or save face and/or research funding.

I hear (but don't care enough to verify) that statisticians have gone over Mendel's work and found it to be fudged a bit, as well. For what it's worth.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 07:47 am
@patiodog,
(Off-topic... but Patiodog, have you seen Robert's thread about Harry?)

Edit: this one:

http://able2know.org/topic/129677-1
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 08:20 am
@patiodog,
I just saw a PBS documentary on Dr. Walter Freeman who insisted lobotomy was a legitimate form of psychosurgery. He performed thousands of these harmful surgeries on all sorts of people. On some level he so believed in his ideas that he couldn't see all the damage he was doing. He often interpreted his own research to meet his own expectations and passed it off as fact. Fanatics are scary.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 12:18 pm
@patiodog,
That's a reasonable take (i just now saw your post), and one which i suspect describes how a great deal of statistically-based research is conducted. The comment about Mendel is interesting--but am i not correct in stating that Mendel's basic thesis has been borne out again and again in subsequent research?
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2009 09:01 pm
@Setanta,
His basic thesis has absolutely been borne out, it's one of the fundamental ideas of modern biology.

If I remember right, the thinking goes along the line that his data fit very nicely with models of inheritance based on a small number of alleles resulting in a small number of traits -- but that the traits described also are subtly influenced by multiple genes, and that Mendel's data fits his simple model very nicely, but is quite improbable if the inheritance patterns of actual pea plants are taken into account.

Or something. I think it was brought up as a side note in a genetics lecture several years back.

At any rate, you can definitely have a good idea and do bad science. You can have a terrible idea and do very good science, too.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Feb, 2009 06:09 am
@patiodog,
Quote:
At any rate, you can definitely have a good idea and do bad science. You can have a terrible idea and do very good science, too.


Thanks for the answer, Boss . . . you have here articulated a general statement which applies to a great many areas other than science, too.
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