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12 Living Fossils

 
 
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2008 07:05 pm
http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/12/whats-old-is-ne.html
Here's the first one, check the link for the rest:
http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/images/2008/12/05/purplefrog.jpg
Quote:
The Purple frog, discovered just five years ago in western India, likely escaped detection because it lives underground, emerging for just two weeks during the monsoon season. Distinguished by a pointed snout, it's related to a family of frogs now found only on the Seychelles islands, which split from India 100 million years ago.

Continental drift makes a nice overlap to explain the dispersal of related fauna.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 8,247 • Replies: 9

 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2008 09:05 pm
great stuff! I love that mantis shrimp!
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Dec, 2008 12:43 am
Thanks, rosborne. This is fascinating stuff.
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alex240101
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Dec, 2008 08:47 am
@rosborne979,
Neat link rosborne979. Thanks.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Dec, 2008 08:57 am
@rosborne979,
Although all the specimens are awesome, the one that caught my eye, ros, was the chambered nautilus. Why? because it's the only time that I have understood geometry, and to my knowledge, the only time beauty has been demonstrated via mathmatics.

Fibonacci's golden spiral.

http://shallowsky.com/blog/images/NautilusCutawaySpiral.jpg

Oliver Wendell Holmes' beautiful poem, last stanza.

Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul,
As the swift seasons roll!
Leave thy low-vaulted past!
Let each new temple, nobler than the last,
Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast,
Till thou at length art free,
Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting sea!
rosborne979
 
  3  
Reply Sat 6 Dec, 2008 12:40 pm
@Letty,
Here are some more patterns in nature for you Letty Smile
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/dp5/snow1.jpghttp://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/dp5/snow2.jpghttp://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/dp5/snow3.jpghttp://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/dp5/snow4.jpg

Hexagonal patters are extremely common due to their close-packing shape and due to the prevalence of water on our planet.
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/dp5/snow5.jpg

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/dp5/cymatic1.jpg
Hexagonal pattern produced by light refracting through a small sample of water (about 1.5 cm in diameter) under the influence of vibration. The figure is in constant dynamic motion.
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Dec, 2008 02:31 pm
@rosborne979,
They may not be fossils, ros, but no two snowflakes are alike. Love the H2O molecule. Two parts hydrogen; on part oxygen, right?

Here's something we used to find all over the beach on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/44/151844327_dc9a0d7350.jpg

They are egg cases for a juvenile skate. The skate is related to sharks and rays. Sharks, skates and rays all have a skeleton made up of cartilage - the bendy material that is found in our noses and ears.
One tiny skate will hatch from each egg after nine months - hatching under the surface. The ones that lie on the beach too long are no longer viable, so I use to open them to look at the tiny embrioes.

There have been skate fossils found, but I cannot find a picture of one.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  2  
Reply Sat 6 Dec, 2008 06:05 pm
More patterns in nature

http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v129/249/122/743754971/n743754971_279483_5726.jpg
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Joeblow
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 07:00 am
That Frilled Shark is fantastic and strange. I could look at that all day.
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 08:53 am
@Joeblow,
I like the video of the Velvet Worm (Onychophorans are very ancient creatures, showing up in the Cambrian as Hallucigenia and Aysheaia).
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v478/Dwaggie67/Dinosaurs/OMB%20Pics/Hallucigenia.jpghttp://ircamera.as.arizona.edu/NatSci102/NatSci102/images/cambaysheaia.jpg
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/onychoph/onychophorafr.html


The caption below the Velvet Worm says they are closely related to Tardigrades.

http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/01/amazing-video-o.html#previouspost
What's interesting about the video it to watch the legs move. They appear to be driven by internal pressure. And I think that's how the Onychophorans also move. I never would have thought that Tardigrades are related to Velvet Worms.


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