H2O MAN
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Mar, 2009 11:08 am
@Gary Slusser,


Have you never seen what Chlorine does to pliable rubber?

0 Replies
 
Joethewaterguy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Mar, 2009 11:10 am
@Gary Slusser,
I agree that a pressure tank alone is not enough, that a retention tank should always be used on a chem feed system after the pressure tank. It's that time and exposure thing again. I haven't run across a chem pump failure due to overwork, unless, always a unless, there is so much iron in the well that the lines from the pump to the bladder are so clogged with iron that the well pump can't pump water through causing it to run constantly, ergo the chem pump keeps pumping causing a very high concentration of chlorine. In my area I've seen just about everything, from the pump being clogged with iron , the pipes from the well totally gummed up with iron, the point of injection turned to a rock in the pipe from the chlorine solidifying the iron, the nipple holding the pressure switch plugged completely , the whole "t-bar" under the bladder clogged, the bladder full of sludge. I can go on and on,but let's face it, if the water in the well is that bad, the equipment is going to wear out . and require maintaining. I try to teach all my customers some routine maintainance to keep their systems going. One thing really important on a well with the injector before the bladder is a drain valve at the bladder and routine draining of the bladder to remove the sludge buildup.
Joe
0 Replies
 
H2O MAN
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Mar, 2009 02:33 pm


For best results ALL water treatment equipment should be installed post pressure tank and post pressure regulator.
Joethewaterguy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Mar, 2009 02:48 pm
@H2O MAN,
and how would you turn the chem pump on and off? oh that's right you don't use them
H2O MAN
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 06:52 am
@Joethewaterguy,
I use a pre wired Thomas flow switch with a Stenner pump.
Gary Slusser
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 10:12 am
@H2O MAN,
I refuse to sell solution feeders because of the baby sitting and tinkering they require, not to mention large retention tanks and their expense but it seems you think there is "rubber" in pressure tanks, not so.
H2O MAN
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 12:32 pm
@Gary Slusser,
Gary Slusser wrote:

I refuse to sell solution feeders because of the baby sitting and tinkering they require.


You don't service what you sell so why would it matter?
0 Replies
 
Joethewaterguy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Mar, 2009 02:13 pm
@H2O MAN,
sorry, thought that I was replying to Gary about not using pumps.. Do you like stenner better that chemtek? I'm a little leary of the surgical tube and why they provide an extra in the box, and the stenners don't seem to work too well if you're using soda ash or caustic soda. could it be a slime build up in the tube? Just asking a couple questions, cause I don't the answers. Talked to the local Rainsoft dealer and he said the same thing about ph increasers. Oh yeah, one other question, can you use the same stenner for chlorine and soda/caustic injection, or do you have to go with 2 pumps/ tanks? , I've seen the chemteks both ways. Joe
Andy CWS
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Mar, 2009 04:26 pm
@Joethewaterguy,
I have used chem-feeders for years with chlorine, hydrogen peroxide and sodium hydroxide. Stenner pumps are easy to maintain and it is simple to replace the tube. Yes, they do come with an extra tube at no additional cost. This is, in part, due to the necessity of quick replacement in the event of failure or scheduled maintenance so that water service is not interrupted for long.

I prefer peristaltic pumps as they don’t need priming like diaphragm/reed models, which we routinely replace. Since we are responsible for the products we sell, we want to make sure they work well and long.

Stenner pumps can come with a dual feeder for completely separate chemical feeds. The switch can be attached to the pressure switch and injector point anywhere on the line after the pressure tank, tee, gauge, etc.

When water is being used that is not to be treated, say for irrigation, then a flow meter and switch modulator can be added to activate pump only when treated water is in demand. By monitoring flow in service lines. It cost more but works very well.

Andy Christensen, CWS-II
0 Replies
 
crank
 
  0  
Reply Sat 20 Apr, 2013 01:44 am
@richierich,
This procedure kills the bacteria and microbes in water and provides you purified water.
0 Replies
 
Kixakosha
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 23 May, 2019 06:34 am
@richierich,
I think. you can use a water filter.
0 Replies
 
 

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