OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Nov, 2008 02:53 pm
@High Seas,
Thank u very much, High Seas; I 'll make a note of that.





David
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 Nov, 2008 02:57 pm
@ehBeth,
Norton is asking me to renew my subscription,
but I 've already put on and used Spyware Doctor.

Shoud I renew with Norton
to have a lot of anti-viral programs ?

Is it a good idea to have a lot of different anti-viral programs ?





David
High Seas
 
  0  
Reply Sat 15 Nov, 2008 02:58 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Hey, anything for a fellow life member of the NRA Smile
High Seas
 
  0  
Reply Sat 15 Nov, 2008 03:02 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
If you want to have more than one, get one that you pay for (Norton is my own favorite) and couple of freeware (compatible with Norton, and excellent, are Spybot and Ad-Aware) programs. CCleaner will not clean up viruses or worms, and the PCPitstop scan won't spot some of the deeply embedded malware.

If suspicious of a specific item upload it to these guys, they'll check it for free
http://www.virustotal.com/

Got to run, back next month, good luck David Smile
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 Nov, 2008 03:17 pm
@High Seas,
Quote:

Hey, anything for a fellow life member of the NRA

U r GOOD, High Seas.
How did u know about my Life membership ?

Its been about 50 years since I got it.
It was a good investment.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Nov, 2008 03:19 pm
@High Seas,
Quote:

If you want to have more than one, get one that you pay for
(Norton is my own favorite) and couple of freeware (compatible
with Norton, and excellent, are Spybot and Ad-Aware) programs.
CCleaner will not clean up viruses or worms, and the PCPitstop
scan won't spot some of the deeply embedded malware.

If suspicious of a specific item upload it to these guys,
they'll check it for free http://www.virustotal.com/

Got to run, back next month, good luck David

OK -- thanks again !





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Nov, 2008 09:08 pm
@High Seas,
Quote:

Hey, anything for a fellow life member of the NRA

I see from your profile
that u live in Manhattan. We are going to have some Mensa SIG dinners
there this month and in December; perhaps u 'll be interested in attending ?





David
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Nov, 2008 03:02 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
just managed to login - am travelling, not sure when can post again - to say in addition to Norton (paid program, about $50/year), Spybot, (free), Ad-Aware, (free), another excellent freeware is ZoneAlarm.

Foxfyre - the whole point isn't to run antivirus programs after you notice problems, it's to run them during internet sessions so as to block infections to begin with; later may be too late.

David - not a member of MENSA, sorry, not sure even if I qualify: what's the cutoff point, 150, 160? Thanks for invite anyway.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Nov, 2008 03:37 pm
@High Seas,
High Seas wrote:

just managed to login - am travelling, not sure when can post again -
to say in addition to Norton (paid program, about $50/year),
Spybot, (free), Ad-Aware, (free), another excellent freeware is ZoneAlarm.

Foxfyre - the whole point isn't to run antivirus programs after you
notice problems, it's to run them during internet sessions so as to
block infections to begin with; later may be too late.

How do u run them during internet sessions ?
(I don 't know much about computers.)

Quote:

David - not a member of MENSA, sorry,
not sure even if I qualify: what's the cutoff point, 150, 160?
Thanks for invite anyway.

Meetings, including SIG meetings,
are open to Mensans and their guests.
30 years ago, I was a guest at Mensa 's Halloween Party,
where someone convinced me to test for membership.
The cutoff point is the top 2% worldwide on a major I.Q. test,
including any test that u have already taken (probably in school).

I suggested it because I saw that u live in Manhattan.
We have most of our meetings there, including dinners.

Its very libertarian, in that any member can advertize
a meeting in the local membership journal (we call it Mphasis)
to do whatever he thinks is good to do.
(presumably, it shoud be something within the law)
Whoever is interested in participating in his activity will do so.
We also have a lot of conventions, scattered around America
in fun spots like Las Vegas, Orlando, n New Orleans.
I founded the fine dining Special Interest Group.
We call it the Opulent Mensans SIG.
My SIG's next dinner will be on Monday evening.

Where are u traveling ?



David
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Nov, 2008 03:47 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
right now at airport, you can e-mail me at following address
ron (dot) noname (at) yahoo

am really not named "ron", let alone "noname" but that's the address I use on the net. there's a dot betweet the 2 words. Download ZoneAlarm, you'll see how it works in real time. tks, bye, hope to hear from you soon
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Nov, 2008 04:44 pm
@High Seas,
High Seas wrote:

right now at airport, you can e-mail me at following address
ron (dot) noname (at) yahoo

am really not named "ron", let alone "noname" but that's the address I use on the net. there's a dot betweet the 2 words. Download ZoneAlarm, you'll see how it works in real time. tks, bye, hope to hear from you soon

Yeah, I 'll email u now.


David
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Nov, 2008 07:12 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

High Seas wrote:

right now at airport, you can e-mail me at following address
ron (dot) noname (at) yahoo

am really not named "ron", let alone "noname" but that's the address I use on the net. there's a dot betweet the 2 words. Download ZoneAlarm, you'll see how it works in real time. tks, bye, hope to hear from you soon

Yeah, I 'll email u now.


David

OK: I hope u received it, now
David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Nov, 2008 11:53 pm
@High Seas,
High Seas wrote:

right now at airport, you can e-mail me at following address
ron (dot) noname (at) yahoo

am really not named "ron", let alone "noname" but
that's the address I use on the net. there's a dot
betweet the 2 words. Download ZoneAlarm, you'll see how it
works in real time. tks, bye, hope to hear from you soon

I don 't know whether u received my message
in your email. My Mensa SIG is on for One If By Land,
Two If By Sea at 17 Barrow St (a few feet off of 7th Ave.) at 6 PM.

Please let me know whether u wish to be on the list
for purposes of confirming the number with the Maitre D.





David
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Dec, 2008 01:27 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
The worm turns
Dec 4th 2008
From The Economist print edition


A cyber-attack alarms the Pentagon

BATTLEFIELD bandwidth is low at best, making networks sticky and e-mails tricky. American soldiers often rely on memory sticks to cart vital data between computers. Off-duty, they use the same devices to move around music and photos. The dangers of that have just become apparent with the news that the Pentagon has banned the use of all portable memory devices because of the spread of a bit of malicious software called agent.btz.

This is a “worm”, meaning that it replicates itself. If you have it on, say, the memory card of a digital camera it will infect any computer to which you upload photos. It will then infect any other portable memory plugged into that computer (the cyber-equivalent, one might say, of a sexually transmitted disease). On any computer hooked up to the internet, this variant tries to download more nasty stuff: in this case two programs that access the hard-drive. Was it a humdrum crime of trying to steal banking details? Or something more serious? The trail has gone cold.

In any case, the malicious software (malware in the jargon) penetrated at least one classified computer network. The problem was severe enough for Admiral Michael Mullen, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, to brief George Bush on it. Officials are saying little more than that.

Kimberly Zenz, an expert on cyberwarfare at VeriSign iDefense, a computer security company that is investigating the attack, notes that it is not clear that agent.btz was designed specifically to target military networks, or indeed that it comes from either Russia or China (two countries known to have state-sponsored cyberwarfare programmes that regularly target American government computer networks).

Indeed, she says, by the standards of cyberwarfare, agent.btz is pretty basic; it is a variant of a well-known bit of malware called the SillyFDC worm, which has been around for at least three years. By contrast, a government commission warned Congress last month that “since China’s current cyber operations capability is so advanced, it can engage in forms of cyberwarfare so sophisticated that the United States may be unable to counteract or even detect the efforts.”

The most remarkable feature of the episode may not be the breach of security, but the cost of dealing with it. In the civilian world, at least one bank has dealt with agent.btz by blocking all its computers’ USB ports with glue. Every bit of portable memory in the sprawling American military establishment now needs to be scrubbed clean before it can be used again. In the meantime, soldiers will find it hard or outright impossible to share, say, vital digital maps, let alone synch their iPods or exchange pictures with their families.


Copyright © 2008 The Economist Newspaper and The Economist Group. All rights reserved.
0 Replies
 
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Dec, 2008 01:35 pm
@High Seas,
High Seas wrote:

just managed to login - am travelling, not sure when can post again - to say in addition to Norton (paid program, about $50/year), Spybot, (free), Ad-Aware, (free), another excellent freeware is ZoneAlarm.

Foxfyre - the whole point isn't to run antivirus programs after you notice problems, it's to run them during internet sessions so as to block infections to begin with; later may be too late.


I do have anti virus and anti malware programs as well as a good firewall in place and up and running at all times. I think most of us do. But every once in awhile I pick up malware that my existing protection misses and can't eradicate. THAT's when I install Spydoctor which so far will ferret out and eradicate the offending malware every time.

BUT....Spydoctor for whatever reason doesn't play nice with my system and creates other problems so I then uninstall it until I need it again. Meanwhile, for the most part my regular protection takes care of all incoming.
0 Replies
 
 

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