38
   

People are saying some really ugly things here in Texas....

 
 
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 09:13 am
@cjhsa,
cjhsa wrote:
you paint all of those that oppose [you] as racists.

You're privy to my private conversations, and you know for a fact that none of these people have expressed racist viewpoints?

You're less coherent than usual, today.
0 Replies
 
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 09:14 am
Every family has their share of... mixed personalities. I wouldn't dream of abandoning my family members over their political beliefs no matter how ignorant I find their beliefs to be. I'm sure some feel the same about my beliefs and they have not cast me from the family.

I do avoid talking abut politics with certain family members. Some will never change. Others are young. I hold out hope for them. Mom... Well, she may come around and she may not. I love her anyways. Politics isn't everything. Family can be.

(By politics I refer to the current election and racial undertones/overtones that have been voiced by family members)
Bella Dea
 
  0  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 09:22 am
My parents shocked the **** out of me when they told me they voted Obama.

Things CAN change and things WILL change.

chai2
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 09:32 am
@Bella Dea,
I almost wish my partents were alive for this moment.

My father would be enraged, and my mother would have a befuddled look on her face, as in "but I don't understand WHY a colored guy would want to be President"

All I can say DrewDad, is don't let anyone extinguish you positive karma.

Whenever I hear someone on the radio saying they told their kid "you can be anything you want, even the President" and these kids now know it's true, my heart swells with happiness.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  -4  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 09:34 am
Texas makes shitty barbecue too.
Cycloptichorn
 
  0  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 09:50 am
@cjhsa,
cjhsa wrote:

Texas makes shitty barbecue too.


Now you've crossed the line, loser. Laughing

I was thinking about you the other night when Obama won, cj.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  0  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 09:53 am
@cjhsa,
cjhsa wrote:

Texas makes shitty barbecue too.


Wonder why you're so unhappy, cj.
0 Replies
 
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:00 am
@squinney,
squinney wrote:

Every family has their share of... mixed personalities. I wouldn't dream of abandoning my family members over their political beliefs no matter how ignorant I find their beliefs to be. I'm sure some feel the same about my beliefs and they have not cast me from the family.

I do avoid talking abut politics with certain family members. Some will never change. Others are young. I hold out hope for them. Mom... Well, she may come around and she may not. I love her anyways. Politics isn't everything. Family can be.

(By politics I refer to the current election and racial undertones/overtones that have been voiced by family members)


I'm with Squinney. Family is family and you don't disown folks just because they say or do something stupid.

My family is hugely diverse with a lot of multi-national, multi-ethnic, multi-religion, multi-language representation, and with socio/political attitudes that cover the entire spectrum. We allow the old timers their cultural conditioning just as the younger generation allows my generation ours, and we try not to be too judgmental. We figure it's healthier to let everybody vent and say their peace, knowing that if circumstances change over the coming months and years, so will their opinion of those elected and probably their attitudes about them. But everybody is still family who loves us and who we love despite all the warts, quirks, and squirrely ideas from time to time.

(I do wonder about one of my brother-in-laws that I haven't talked to since the election though. He wouldn't hurt a fly but he's an elderly redneck conservative who thinks Republicans are the scourge of the Earth and that only Democrats are fit to be in government. And, he is an old timer Texan too for whom the old racist language and mindset dies hard. So here we are with a black Democrat President, and I really wonder how he's dealing with that. Smile
maporsche
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:15 am
@cjhsa,
cjhsa....I've defended you for the last 2 days....I'm tired of looking at your crap.

You are the first person I'm going to ignore.
Debra Law
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:18 am
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

I'm embarrassed and appalled by some of the things my family and friends are revealing about themselves after this election.

My respect for Mr. Obama increased a great deal, because if I'm appalled by this, I can hardly imagine what he's had to deal with his entire life. (My admiration extends to everyone who has to deal with this, and manages not to be consumed with rage.)


Ditto. I've had my heart broken many times during this election by people that I love. But, I also shared my feelings of shock and disappointment at the prejudice that I witnessed. Despite that heartache, I felt such energy and pride: ENOUGH of us were able to fight those old demons of prejudice in sufficient numbers and collectively vote to elect a black man as our president. We turned a page in our history. In the past, we paid little more than lip-service and homage to our diversity as a people. Finally, we're starting to embrace it.

When I watched the coverage of the election returns, the cameras panned the sea of people gathered in Grant Park. It was AMAZING! Thousands and thousands of people of every color were gathered TOGETHER--unified and celebrating and waving our flag! That was a scene that truly represented America as it should be and it touched my heart. It was a stark CONTRAST to the much smaller crowd of white people gathered in Arizona to hear McCain speak. It was the ephiphany of seeing new-era America (of inclusiveness & equality) vs. old-era America (of divisiveness & inequality) that made tears of joy flow down my cheeks. FINALLY, America is living up to its promise. Our children and our grandchildren--ALL future generations of Americans--will be the beneficiaries.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:19 am
@maporsche,
Dow down 230 and 500 in two days since O-boy got the nod.

Suckers!!!!!
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:19 am
@FreeDuck,
FreeDuck wrote:

DrewDad wrote:

One expects kooks on the Internet. These are people I've had Thanksgiving dinner with.


Then maybe expressing your disappointment in them will have some effect?

That was the case in my family. My dad tries to hide his racism, but it's pretty apparent. My mom just came right out and said she was surprised I could support a black man for President even though she really didn't like McCain. Over the period of a couple of months, I won her over. Right before the election, she went to the Obama headquarters for a lapel pin she could wear on election night. To wear an Obama pin in rural Alabama is as strong a statement as anyone could make and I couldn't be more proud of her.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:20 am
@cjhsa,
I second my own motion - Texas barbecue sucks.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:38 am
What I don't understand is why this is coming out now. It's been apparent that Obama was going to win for a few weeks now. His lead in the polls has been consistent since the second debate. You would think that all the gnashing of teeth would have been over by now. CJ et al knew this day was coming for a while.
cjhsa
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:47 am
@engineer,
I don't trust polls any more than I do O-boy or Obamorons.
Cycloptichorn
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:50 am
@cjhsa,
cjhsa wrote:

I don't trust polls any more than I do O-boy or Obamorons.


Well, do you feel differently, now that the polls have been shown to have been pretty accurate?

Cycloptichorn
cjhsa
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:51 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:

cjhsa wrote:

I don't trust polls any more than I do O-boy or Obamorons.


Well, do you feel differently, now that the polls have been shown to have been pretty accurate?

Cycloptichorn


Even Texas can fool you by trucking in some KC barbecue...
sozobe
 
  3  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:54 am
@engineer,
The celebration I think. Obama really took pains to not make his candidacy about race. A WHOLE lot of the post-election coverage (and election-day coverage) has been about race. First African-American president. Black people celebrating.

I think this makes some people nervous (that was mentioned in this thread too I think, sorry that I forget who). A certain Manchurian candidate fear -- that he's going to be the president of black people rather than the president of everyone. (In case it needs saying, I don't think this at all -- just laying out a possible thought process.)
Cycloptichorn
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 10:58 am
@cjhsa,
cjhsa wrote:

Cycloptichorn wrote:

cjhsa wrote:

I don't trust polls any more than I do O-boy or Obamorons.


Well, do you feel differently, now that the polls have been shown to have been pretty accurate?

Cycloptichorn


Even Texas can fool you by trucking in some KC barbecue...


Lol, what a joke. KC barbecue is good, but nothing compared to the Real Deal.

Cycloptichorn
cjhsa
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 11:01 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Texas barbecue tastes like they smoked a cow plop and called it brisket.
 

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