22
   

things that are American...

 
 
alex240101
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 04:32 pm
http://www.stickon.com/teamwork.jpg
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:20 pm
@Foxfyre,
Quote:
... all countries HAVE a Fourth of July,
but I do believe we are the only one that makes that an official
national holiday and celebrate it with uniquely American traditions.

SO STIPULATED, Foxfyre

In the words of American Founding Father and 2nd President John Adams,
the holiday is "the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated
as the day of deliverance. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade,
with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations,
from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more."
[emphasis added by David]





David
hingehead
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:22 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade,
with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations,
from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more."
[emphasis added by David]


LMBO. Thanks for clarifying David, for a minute there I thought John Adams had accidently hit Ctrl B on his word processor.

[Emphasis added by Hinge]
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:24 pm
drive thru liquor stores

and

drive by shootings
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:27 pm
@dyslexia,
Quote:

September 16 (dieciséis de septiembre in Spanish),
which is the most important national patriotic holiday in Mexico.

It is interesting that on September 17th, we have Constitution Day,
commemorating completion of work by the Constitutional Convention in 1787





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:30 pm
@mismi,
Quote:

Re: OmSigDAVID(Post 3455493)
grits (well the Southerners anyway...)

Let the record indicate that I have never eaten a grit.





0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:31 pm
Crack.

As Denis Leary said 'Only in America would someone say cocaine isn't enough.'
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:35 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:

food, David, food

unless you're eating revolvers

Yes, indeed. Well said.
U can sleep next to them,
but u shoud not eat them; bad for your teeth.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:37 pm
@lou2,
Quote:

well, what sort of food do they eat? is it like british food but bigger?

May we inquire as to your age, Lou2 ?





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:39 pm
@CalamityJane,
Quote:

Re: gustavratzenhofer(Post 3455616)
Just like alligator or rattle snake, gustav - less chewy though!

I have eaten both alligator and crocodile
(tho not during the same meal).





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:57 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
The prosecution rests its case.

Judgment for Defendant,
dismissing the complaint for failure to establish a prima facie case.

Defendant said:
Quote:
The USA Fourth July celebration is uniquely our own
as well including fireworks displays, frequent patriotic parades,
and traditionally including all the usual backyard bar-b-que, beer,
and hotdogs as the usual cuisine.

(There are other holidays unique to the USA,
but the others really don't include any kind of universal traditions.)
[emphasis added]

It is clear that the subject matter of Defendant 's assertion
was celebration and holidays, rather than days of the calendar.

JUDGMENT ACCORDINGLY.

E N T E R





David, J.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 06:03 pm
@hingehead,
That was FUNNY !
Thank u, Hinge
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 07:33 pm
Yeah . . . so, like i said, basketball was invented by a Canajun . . .

Every few years, in the Spring, the letters section of the New York Times enjoys a spate of letters, in a spirit of friendly but intense rivalry on the topic of when the first baseball games were played. The rivalry has usually fallen out between New Jersey and New York, at some time in the 1830s--although some claim the 1820s, there are apparently no newspaper notices earlier than some time in the 1830s. It is usually noticed that the game is referred to as base ball, rather than the modern spelling, baseball.

Northanger Abbey, by Jane Austen, is considered her most successfully satirical novel. It was published posthumously, in 1817--but it was based on a piece of her juvenillia, Catherine, or the Bower, which she seems to have written in 1796, and presented to her family in 1797. She reworked this as a novel in 1798, probably completing it in 1799. She sold the manuscript for ten pounds sterling in 1803, to a bookseller who put it on a shelf, and who cheerfully sold it back to her brother years later for exactly what he had paid for it. He must not have been much of bookseller, because he was, it seemed, unaware that Austen had by then published four successful novels.

What has this to do with baseball, one might enquire, and reasonably. On the very first page of most editions, is the third paragraph, which begins:

Mrs. Morland was a very good woman, and wished to see her children everything they ought to be; but her time was so much occupied in lying"in and teaching the little ones, that her elder daughters were inevitably left to shift for themselves; and it was not very wonderful that Catherine, who had by nature nothing heroic about her, should prefer cricket, baseball, riding on horseback, and running about the country at the age of fourteen, to books . . .

You will note that, in fact, baseball is here spelled exactly as is the custom in contemporary America.

I have several times written to the Times in order to enlighten my fellow countrymen, benighted at least in this one single regard. Alas, i have never seen one of my letters printed, and have received no acknowledgement from the editorial staff of that august journal, even when i have written privily to the editors to make them aware of this omission on their part.

It seems that there are some sacred cows which never will be slaughtered, nor even disturbed in their dull-witted, bovine ruminations.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 07:39 pm
@saab,
Yes, but it's hard to find anything louder or more expensive.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 07:41 pm
@Foxfyre,
Foxfyre wrote:



Dragging Main Street at least used to be a uniquely American tradition. When I was a kid, so was stealing watermelons, but I don't think kids do that any more. (When I was a kid, watermelon was around 10 cents each. Now they are precious commodity.)


Nah. Crusin' Main Street is a derivitive of the Mexican paseo.

Just not your day, huh Foxy?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 07:43 pm
Fox is a hell of a lot older than i'd have thought. My grandfather, who was born in 1897, told me about ten cent watermelons. No wonder she's so confused about so many things.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 07:45 pm
@Setanta,
Prejudice against the elderly.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 07:49 pm
Prejudice means judging someone in advance of knowing them . . . i've been reading Fox's tripe for years, but i have only now become aware of what is undoubtedly the cause of Fox's undeniable intellectual hebetude . . .
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 07:56 pm
Not to get all Red Sox vs. Yankees on you, Set, but I'm pretty sure I remember a story in the last few months in the Boston Globe about a reference some antiquarian found in a newspaper from about the same time as Jane, 1797, or thereabouts, of a "baseball" game (exactly what it was unspecified) being played somewhere in MA farther west than Boston.

Also, speaking of Sox vs Yanks, the big division pre-Civil War was between Boston vs. New York style of play. New York-style was probably ancestral to today. Boston-style was played on a square field with four bases and home. Home plate was at the middle of the line between fourth and first, rather than at the corner of a diamond. Much like the years before 2004, the despicable Yankees prevailed.

0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 08:05 pm
Woodward Avenue out of Detroit. Definitely cruising for burgers, hitting on every carhop between Eight Mile and Fifteen Mile. The Birmingham (MI) Eccentric, my original hometown weekly newspaper runs a wildly successful cruising night once or twice a year for balding baby boomers to roll a pack of smokes up in the sleeve of a t-shirt and Brylcreem the hair and get out on the strip again. T buckets live.

We moved to NJ just after I got my license, so I missed out directly on that action. Closest I came was when my 8th grade teacher took my best friend and me out for pizza one night--back when pizza was an exotic ethnic cuisine that people had just barely heard of--and the most incredibly exciting song I'd ever heard came on the jukebox, and I HAD to get up and find out what it was--it was C 8, Chuck Berry singing "School Days", and I was hooked--the first time Rock'n'Roll really hit me.

Cars, hot rods, burgers, pizza, rock.

 

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