22
   

things that are American...

 
 
Foxfyre
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 10:13 am
@farmerman,
Well I may be full of **** Farmerman, and I concede all countries HAVE a Fourth of July, but I do believe we are the only one that makes that an official national holiday and celebrate it with uniquely American traditions.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 10:42 am
@Foxfyre,
cinco de mayo and September 16 (dieciséis de septiembre in Spanish), which is the most important national patriotic holiday in Mexico.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 10:47 am
@Foxfyre,
Quote:
Well I may be full of **** Farmerman, and I concede all countries HAVE a Fourth of July,


The prosecution rests its case.
Cliff Hanger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 12:41 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
Youre fulla **** foxy. All other countries recognize a Fourth of July


All other countries? I thought America was the only country.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 12:46 pm
@lou2,
Chevrolet
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 12:57 pm
Fried pies, fried baloney sammiches, southern style pork bar-b-que sammiches (pulled pork in bar-b-que sauce, and it ain't real without cole slaw on top of the pork), corn bread, coney dogs . . . allow me to interrupt here--i love that one--coney is an old Anglo-Norman word for a rabbit, and an island near New York was named Coney Island because of the many rabbits. Eventually, Coney Island became famous for it's beaches, it's board walk and it's amusement park, where one could purchase a frankfurter sausage served on a "milk roll," from which the modern "hot dog bun" derives. Frankfurter sausages (from Frankfurt in Germany) and wiener sausages (wiener as in comes from Wien, called Vienna in English), which are very similar, are called hot dogs because of accusations in the 1800s that unscrupulous butchers used dog meat in making their sausages. Originally, a German immigrant from Frankfurt sold frankfurters and sauerkraut from a push cart on Coney Island in the late 19th century when it was becoming a recreation center for New York City. More irony is to be heaped on with your condiments. The "Coney Island hot dog" was never served on Coney Island. The name was used because Coney Island became famous for its hot dogs, but the modern classic coney island dog is not a hot dog with sauerkraut, it is a hot dog with chili (no beans), shredded cheese and onions. How that came about, i couldn't say. But there ain't no dog and there ain't no rabbit in a coney island dog . . .

. . . and now to return to our regularly scheduled program: corn dogs (a hot dog encased in something vaguely resembling corn bread, and impaled on a small stick), tacos and burritos (the American versions don't resemble anything known to Mexican cuisine), funnel cakes, cotton candy, scrapple, biscuits (such as are only known in America) and red eye gravy . . .

My inspirational well is running dry . . . perhaps i'll come back . . .
Cliff Hanger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 01:08 pm
@Setanta,
Scapple, I only learned about this a couple of years ago. A vile but beloved food product for some.

What about Hush Puppies?

The first time I went to the South here was the dialogue I had in a restaurant:

Waitress: "We got Hush Puppies."

Me: "What are Hush Puppies? " (Shoes, to me)

Waitress looking at me with bulging eyes and incredulous: "Why, it's a Hush Puppy."

At this point, I knew she was not going to dazzle me with an articulate answer so I ordered them. They are definitely a food you need to be raised on to have some attachment to.
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 01:10 pm
A real, live, kicking, hunting and fishing heritage.
0 Replies
 
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 01:15 pm
@Cliff Hanger,
You must have gotten some really bad hush puppies because usually--at least those prepared the traditional Southern American style--they are something that nobody doesn't like. Admittedly not everybody knows how to make them though.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 01:21 pm
Jazz

Country music

Basketball
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 01:32 pm
@farmerman,
Re: Foxfyre(Post 3455639)
Quote:
Well I may be full of **** Farmerman, and I concede all countries HAVE a Fourth of July,

The prosecution rests its case.


http://static.flickr.com/153/360947858_1708c01845_s.jpg

Je accuse!
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 01:45 pm
@Butrflynet,
I hate to pee on your Wheaties, but basketball was invented by a Canajun . . .
Cliff Hanger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 02:02 pm
@Foxfyre,
They were really tasteless pieces of crap. But how is it possible to ruin anything that's deep fried?
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 02:53 pm
@Setanta,
In early December 1891, Dr. James Naismith,[1] a Canadian physical education professor from McGill University of Montréal and instructor at YMCA Training School[2] (today, Springfield College) in Springfield, Massachusetts, USA, sought a vigorous indoor game to keep his students occupied and at proper levels of fitness during the long New England winters. After rejecting other ideas as either too rough or poorly suited to walled-in gymnasiums, he wrote the basic rules and nailed a peach basket onto a 10-foot (3.05 m) elevated track. In contrast with modern basketball nets, this peach basket retained its bottom, and balls had to be retrieved manually after each "basket" or point scored; this proved inefficient, however, so a hole was drilled into the bottom of the basket, allowing the balls to be poked out with a long dowel each time. The peach baskets were used until 1906 when they were finally replaced by metal hoops with backboards. A further change was soon made, so the ball merely passed through, paving the way for the game we know today. A soccer ball was used to shoot goals. Whenever a person got the ball in the basket, his team would gain a point. Whichever team got the most points won the game.[3]

Naismith's handwritten diaries, discovered by his granddaughter in early 2006, indicate that he was nervous about the new game he had invented, which incorporated rules from a children's game called "Duck on a Rock", as many had failed before it. Naismith called the new game 'Basket Ball'.[4]

The first official game was played in the YMCA gymnasium on January 20, 1892 with nine players and the game ended at 1-0 and the shot was made from 25 feet (7.6 m), on a court just half the size of a present-day Streetball or National Basketball Association (NBA) court. "Basket ball", the name suggested by one of Naismith's students, was popular from the beginning. By 1897-1898 teams of five became standard.

Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 02:55 pm
@Butrflynet,
http://web.archive.org/web/20010419124201/www.hoophall.com/history/naismith_resume.htm
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 02:58 pm
@Butrflynet,
http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/news/story?id=2660882

Newly found documents shed light on basketball's birth
Associated Press

Updated: November 13, 2006, 9:05 PM ET
Email
Print
CLAYTON, Mo. -- It's settled. Basketball really did evolve from a childhood game called "Duck on a Rock."

Such are the revelations contained in a newly unearthed trove of personal documents, photographs and mementos from basketball's founder, James Naismith.

The items, including handwritten diaries and typed notes, were discovered last spring, when Naismith's granddaughter, Hellen Carpenter, went down to her basement to find an old family photograph.

Instead, Carpenter found journals, keepsakes and typewritten rule sheets that open a new window on the birth of one of the world's most popular sports.

Carpenter is auctioning off the documents in December. She said they settle details about her grandfather's invention, such as the "Eureka" moment when he remembered rules from Duck on a Rock, a Canadian game he played as a child, and applied them to his new game.

The items include the first rules of basketball; photos of the first basketball team and basketball court, as well as Naismith's description of the very first game; a whistle Naismith used as the first basketball coach in University of Kansas history; and the passport he used to attend the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics, the first to feature basketball as a medal sport.

The five boxes of documents, photos and items were handed down to Carpenter from her mother, Hellen Naismith Dodd, Carpenter said. She kept them around for decades without looking through them.

"My mother told me for years that there was nothing of real value there," said Carpenter, 74.

Chris Ivy disagreed. As director of sports auctions for Heritage Auction Galleries in Dallas, he was stunned when Carpenter called him and described the documents casually stored in her home in the St. Louis suburb of Chesterfield.

Documents autographed by Naismith only surface two or three times a year, he said. Carpenter's boxes were an especially rare find, he said.

"It almost crosses into history -- it's not just sports collectibles," he said.

Naismith carefully recorded basketball's birth in 1891.

At the time, Naismith, a native of Canada, was teaching at a school in Springfield, Mass., that trained young men to become instructors at the newly formed YMCA centers that were opening around the country, Carpenter said.

The students got bored during the winter months when they couldn't play outdoor soccer and football. Naismith needed to invent a strenuous game that could be played on small indoor courts.

He tried to adapt lacrosse and football to be played inside. He even introduced his students to a slew of invented games like Hylo Ball, Scruggy Ball and Association Football. None of them took.

Handwritten diaries show Naismith was nervous the students wouldn't like his newest invention -- Basket Ball, as he called it.

Before the first basketball game was played, Naismith prepared the gym by nailing two baskets to balconies on either end of a court and posting 13 rules of the game on a bulletin board.

"I busied myself arranging the apparatus all the time watching the boys as they arrived to observe their attitude that day," Naismith wrote in cursive script.

"I felt this was a crucial moment in my life as it meant success or failure of my attempt to hold the interest of the class and devise a new game," he wrote.

He seems to have gotten mixed reviews. He wrote that Frank Mahan, a southerner, was the first student to walk on to the court. Mahan looked at the baskets and the rules.

"Huh. Another new game," Mahan said, according to the diary.

Still, basketball caught on. But there were glitches. Naismith eventually added a backboard behind the basket so students couldn't stand in the balcony and knock away good shots from the opposing team, Carpenter said.

Naismith also noted in his journal that it took a lot of reminding to keep students from tackling a player when he got possession of the ball.

The game became more popular as Naismith's students went on to teach at YMCAs around the country, Carpenter said.

Naismith knew before his death in 1939 that he had created a lasting game when basketball became an Olympic sport.

"Up until then, he'd just thought of it as a little game," she said.

0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 03:01 pm
@Butrflynet,
Addendum: the original nine-man teams were based on the fact that each side in a baseball game had that number of players. But it was soon decided that nine was too many on a court that size and the number was reduced to five.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 03:03 pm
hey set, glad to see ya on the boards.


HOAGIES,

TITEBOND,

NYLON,

TRANSISTOR RADIOS

THE LASER

PC's

A BOMB,

FREEZER POPS


COTTON GIN

0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 04:16 pm
duct tape, Scotch tape, post-it notes.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  3  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 04:17 pm
Someon said clam chowder--yes, but ONLY New England-style clam chowder, Manhattan-style is blasphemy and an abomination before the gods.
 

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