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What Happens if You Fall Into a Black Hole?

 
 
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 02:30 am
What Happens if You Fall Into a Black Hole? You die
Quote:
If you were caught by the pull of a black hole, you would be sent into free fall toward its center. The pulling force would increase as you moved toward the center, creating what's called a "tidal force" on your body. That is to say, the gravity acting on your head would be much stronger than the gravity acting on your toes (assuming you were falling head-first). That would make your head accelerate faster than your toes; the difference would stretch your body until it snapped apart, first at its weakest point and then disintegrating rapidly from there as the tidal force became stronger than the chemical bonds holding your body together. You'd be reduced to a bunch of disconnected atoms. Those atoms would be stretched into a line and continue in a processional march. As Tyson described it, you would be "extruded through space like toothpaste being squeezed through a tube."
 
Robert Gentel
 
  3  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 02:32 am
@Robert Gentel,
This sounds funny...

Maximizing Survival Time Inside the Event Horizon of a Black Hole
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 04:57 am
I was under the impression
that the pull of gravity woud stop the flow of time
so that u 'd remain in the same place
dlowan
 
  3  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 05:03 am
@Robert Gentel,
Funny for the black hole.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 05:05 am
@Robert Gentel,
We need a volunteer, on which to test the theory.
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 05:11 am
@dlowan,
Woud Austrailians fall first, because thay r further down ?
dlowan
 
  3  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 05:23 am
@OmSigDAVID,
"Up" and "down" have no relevance in space, unless one is near a body capable of exerting perceivable gravitic force, in which case "down" is towards the core of such body, and "up" is 90 degrees from said core.

The convention of showing maps with north as "up" in relation to the viewer is simply an artefact of said maps having historically been generated by denizens of the northern hemisphere who were triumphant in imposing their belief that they were more important upon the map making conventions at a crucial time.

Should the earth ever fall victim to a black hole, the parts of the planet nearest to the event horizon will be determined by forces which, to any inhabitants of said planet, will appear as near as possible to simple dumb chance.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 08:10 am
@dlowan,
Quote:

Up" and "down" have no relevance in space, unless one is near a body
capable of exerting perceivable gravitic force, in which case "down" is
towards the core of such body, and "up" is 90 degrees from said core.

Assuming the core to be spherical, all directions will be 90 degrees from said core.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 08:13 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
I was under the impression that the pull of gravity woud stop the flow of time so that u 'd remain in the same place

Time is only affected for the person (entity) caught in the distortion of the hole itself. From an external perspective time (and rate of fall) would appear unchanged.

Large black holes have effects which are very different from small black holes because the gradient of gravitational change is much more shallow (because the distance from the singularity to the event horizon is farther). Being inside the event horizon of an ultra-large black hole might be indistinguishable from normal space (if there is such a thing as "normal" space).

Ultimately you would be shredded as you approach the singularity itself, but nothing outside the event horizon would ever see any of the action.

For small black holes, the destructive gradient extends beyond the event horizon which allows some shredded material to escape as "jets" of high energy particles (which we can detect with telescopes). Google for "black hole jets" and you can find lots of info on this.


0 Replies
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 08:48 am
so with these small black holes the super collider may generate.... if a guy just stuck his pecker in there for a few seconds and then yanked it back out... would it stretch it out?
gustavratzenhofer
 
  3  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 09:05 am
Bipolarbear" wrote:
so with these small black holes the super collider may generate.... if a guy just stuck his pecker in there for a few seconds and then yanked it back out... would it stretch it out?


That would work if you wanted your pecker to look like fishing line. Substantial length, but the girth may pose a problem with a prospective bedmate. But, hell, attach a hook to the end if she doesn't like it and go fishing.
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 09:13 am
@Robert Gentel,
Robert posted:

Quote:
...The pulling force would increase as you moved toward the center, creating what's called a "tidal force" on your body. That is to say, the gravity acting on your head would be much stronger than the gravity acting on your toes (assuming you were falling head-first). That would make your head accelerate faster than your toes; the difference would stretch your body until it snapped apart, first at its weakest point and then disintegrating rapidly from there ...


I think we may have an answer to where the detached left feet are coming from. Whoever they belonged to obviously didn't know to go head first. We really need to educate the populace on this so their feet will stop washing up.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  3  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 09:13 am
@Bi-Polar Bear,
If such a thing were to be created by the collider, it would vaporize anything which came within it's event horizon (the size of an atom or smaller) and immediately fall through the bottom of the collider and start heading for the core of the Earth, where it would sit and consume any matter which wandered into its event horizon. It would also produce an outward energy pressure due to the destruction of atoms crowding to get into its event horizon (some portion of energy would probably escape due to orbital acceleration before it entered the event horizon) and this might cause an equilibrium of sorts where the tiny black hole might burn like a little star at the Earth's core (just as the outward energy of a star's nuclear reactions prevent a gravitational collapse) for some unknown period of time. Eventually the hole would eat the planet and continue orbiting the sun in place of the Earth, a tiny invisible speck in the darkness of space with a moon orbiting it.
Endymion
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 09:41 am
I've fallen into a black hole many a time
In fact, I'm due to fall into one any day now
I must have fallen into a black hole at least fifty times since i was 28 and several times before that
It's dark but interesting down there
Maybe next time i'll take a camera and bring back some pictures
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 09:55 am
@Robert Gentel,
There's no such ****ing thing as a "black hole".
0 Replies
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 10:25 am
@gustavratzenhofer,
gives a whole new meaning to "taking the boat to tuna town"
0 Replies
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 10:26 am
@rosborne979,
so what you're saying is...stick to Enzyte?
0 Replies
 
Gelisgesti
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 11:26 am
You never go back?
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 06:00 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Ha! Some kids in the learning center were asking about this today. I was pretty much right on!
nwrilu234
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Sep, 2008 07:50 am
@Robert Gentel,
You won't fall into a black hole, and no one else will either.
 

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