17
   

What Happens if You Fall Into a Black Hole?

 
 
jove
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Sep, 2008 05:56 pm
@nwrilu234,
I had a dream '~Black Holes~' and ~'White Dot's'~

(my ~grandmothers names, Dorothy)

were given to me as a ~gift~ toy. They are my playgrounds. ~White Dot's~ are sometimes more powerful than ~Black Holes~.

I don't know of any articles on White Dot (holes!)

~White Holes~,,, like to implode then explode like super novas. Tnink of a sparkler if you want to envision a ~White Hole~.

I'll send you a dream of a Sea Green with White Holes' dancing on fire amen.
0 Replies
 
gold einstein
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Nov, 2009 12:03 pm
Look the General Relativity of Einstein.Einstein predicted that.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Nov, 2009 12:19 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

We need a volunteer, on which to test the theory.

http://i47.tinypic.com/14lpx5g.jpg
Am I the first to volunteer?
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Nov, 2009 12:24 pm
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:

If such a thing were to be created by the collider, it would vaporize anything which came within it's event horizon (the size of an atom or smaller) and immediately fall through the bottom of the collider and start heading for the core of the Earth, where it would sit and consume any matter which wandered into its event horizon. It would also produce an outward energy pressure due to the destruction of atoms crowding to get into its event horizon (some portion of energy would probably escape due to orbital acceleration before it entered the event horizon) and this might cause an equilibrium of sorts where the tiny black hole might burn like a little star at the Earth's core (just as the outward energy of a star's nuclear reactions prevent a gravitational collapse) for some unknown period of time. Eventually the hole would eat the planet and continue orbiting the sun in place of the Earth, a tiny invisible speck in the darkness of space with a moon orbiting it.


That makes me so optimistic about the Large Hadron Collider! Thanks for sharing! http://i47.tinypic.com/292r8cp.jpg
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Nov, 2009 12:28 pm
@littlek,
littlek wrote:

Ha! Some kids in the learning center were asking about this today. I was pretty much right on!

You're one really smart lady! http://i50.tinypic.com/35d8ars.jpg
I expect you to be one of the mission leaders if and when I get the funding for the trip to the nearest black hole!http://i49.tinypic.com/20trwb8.jpg
0 Replies
 
Tom-a-tom
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Nov, 2009 03:46 pm
If you went into a black hole you would very quickly be compressed into a singularity, however all laws of maths and physics breaks down at the point of singularity so something must come out... and it does!... your mass expressed as an equivalent energy will be emitted as electromagnetic radiation (light) such as radio waves...It's all in "A Brief History of Time" by Stephen Hawking... so if I went in I would come out as 7.33x10^12MJoules of radio waves... no thank you, I'm not volunteering to be turned into spaghetti!!
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Nov, 2009 03:59 pm
@Tom-a-tom,
I don't suppose it's likely that what goes into a black hole ... coming out as spaghetti on the other side which then could then fall into a red hole which then adds a marinara to that spaghettified astrobyproduct?

Or is that my stomach doing the theorizing?
Tom-a-tom
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Nov, 2009 04:12 pm
@tsarstepan,
I think you have italian cuisine on the mind there... As for the red hole, might wan't to take care of what you search the internet for if you're seeing red holes... might see something you don't want to :s
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Nov, 2009 04:21 pm
@Tom-a-tom,
I'll take that advice as gospel truth. Ewwing the possibilities!

And welcome aboard a2k! Anyone with those physics/science chops you displayed is quite alright with me (and quite a bit smarter then me).
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Nov, 2009 08:56 pm
@Tom-a-tom,
Tom-a-tom wrote:
If you went into a black hole you would very quickly be compressed into a singularity, however all laws of maths and physics breaks down at the point of singularity so something must come out... and it does!...

That is incorrect. I think you are misunderstand what Steven meant in his book.

Nothing moves back through the event horizon of a black hole, Nothing.

However, matter and energy which approach the event horizon (but have not yet entered it) are accelerated to high energies and can be thrown away from the event horizon before entering it. "Jets" coming from black holes are examples of this.

Alternately, Hawking Radiation occurs when pairs of quantum virtual particles form near the event horizon where one particle forms on the inside of the horizon and the other forms on the outside (note that nothing "passes through" the event horizon in this case).
Tom-a-tom
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 07:02 pm
@rosborne979,
That's right, now I remember. It's been a long time since I read his book... I've been studying chemistry since then so my knowledge of space has shrunk... a lot... Cheers for that Smile
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2009 07:06 pm
What Happens if You Fall Into a Black Hole?

http://cs.astronomy.com/asycs/blogs/astronomy/Misc/Black_hole_WD.jpg

you owe Disney royalties
0 Replies
 
skater1995
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Apr, 2012 12:41 pm
@edgarblythe,
we could use my friend alecia
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

New Propulsion, the "EM Drive" - Question by TomTomBinks
The Science Thread - Discussion by Wilso
Why do people deny evolution? - Question by JimmyJ
Are we alone in the universe? - Discussion by Jpsy
Fake Science Journals - Discussion by rosborne979
Controvertial "Proof" of Multiverse! - Discussion by littlek
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/18/2021 at 05:56:18