OCCOM BILL
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 12:54 pm
@mac11,
mac11 wrote:

Unfortunately, now her phone's not working - and neither is the phone for the facility where she lives. So I haven't had any updates today. I'm hoping for the best and will try again this evening. If I don't reach her, I'll start in on her friends.
Any word yet, Mac? No power in a hot climate is no fun at all. By now the utility company should have posted estimates somewhere as to which neighborhoods are still out and approximately how long they will be. Might be best to get her out for the time being.
((((((Mac11)))))))
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:03 pm
@OCCOM BILL,
This is a few days old...

http://www.reuters.com/article/bondsNews/idUSN0245560120080902?pageNumber=1&virtualBrandChannel=0

Quote:
HOUSTON (Reuters) - Entergy Corp (ETR.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz), Louisiana's largest utility, on Tuesday said 70 percent of its 1.1 million customers were without power a day after Hurricane Gustav slammed into the Gulf Coast, rivaled only by 2005's Hurricane Katrina in its destruction.

Entergy warned of "extremely severe damage" to its transmission grid, and said 13 of 14 key transmission lines carrying power to New Orleans were out of service.

"The damage is not as severe as Katrina in New Orleans," said Dennis Dawsey, Entergy's vice president of distribution. "In Baton Rouge, we saw significant damage."

<snip>

Restoring electricity to homes and businesses will require a delicate balancing act. The utility must match transmission capacity and generation capacity or risk triggering a widespread blackout due to power imbalances, Dawsey said.

While Gustav's impact on the state was less severe than devastation left by Katrina's flooding, its damage to Entergy's grid was worse, particularly in the Baton Rouge area, said Renae Conley, president of two Entergy utility units serving Louisiana.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:05 pm
@OCCOM BILL,
Today...

Quote:
BEAUMONT, Texas " The path of Hurricane Gustav offered New Orleans a reprieve, but 80 miles away where utilities say the devastation was the worst they have ever seen, the storm offered nothing but punishment.

The region’s top power company, Entergy Corp., said the Baton Rouge area has never suffered damage as severe as that caused by Gustav. The last storm that caused damage close to Gustav was in 1992 when Hurricane Andrew hit south Florida, crossed the Gulf of Mexico and then slammed Louisiana.

The story is the same across Acadiana. SLEMCO has restored power to two-thirds of its customers, but 29,000 are still without electricity.

Cleco, hit hardest of all, still has about 110,000 of its 246,000 customers out. Cleco said more of its customers were blacked out by Gustav than by Lili, Katrina or Rita.

The Lafayette Utilities System has restored power to all but about 1,500 of its 60,000 customers.

Co-op Dixie Electric Membership Corp., based in Baton Rouge, at one-time reported all 95,000 members were without power. The last time that happened: 1992.


http://www.thenewsstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080905/UPDATES01/80905008
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:11 pm
@mac11,
mac11 - what's the word on your mother?
0 Replies
 
eoe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:12 pm
Spoke with my folks in Baton Rouge. One family has power but the others do not and my cousin said they're being told that they will be without power for anywhere from 8 days to 3 weeks. Shocked
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:22 pm
@eoe,
yikes!
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:25 pm
@JPB,
Oh no eoe . Hoping they get it done faster than they think.
0 Replies
 
mac11
 
  5  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:26 pm
Thanks for the concern, everybody. Mom's power came back on Wednesday evening.

She was being stubborn, and absolutely refused to leave. She's 79, blind, and doesn't get around well. Her apartment is the only place she wants to be - even if it's 90-some degrees.
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:27 pm
@mac11,
hooray!
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:41 pm
@mac11,
whew! Thanks for letting us know, mac. I'm sure you're more than relieved.
0 Replies
 
mac11
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:43 pm
I feel bad that I didn't post that here sooner. I had no idea so many people were worried!
Izzie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:44 pm
@mac11,
Good to hear Mom is safe and sound Mac11. x
0 Replies
 
eoe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 02:50 pm
@mac11,
mac11 wrote:

Thanks for the concern, everybody. Mom's power came back on Wednesday evening.

She was being stubborn, and absolutely refused to leave. She's 79, blind, and doesn't get around well. Her apartment is the only place she wants to be - even if it's 90-some degrees.


I'll bet it is!! I know it worried you greatly but she was comfy-cozy in her little spot.

After Katrina, my then 93 year old aunt in Enterprise, Miss, was without power for several weeks. Her two sons were going absolutely nuts, running back and forth to Meridian to make phone calls and to juice up their cellphones and I was very, very worried about my aunt. A friend of mine put it into perspective. She said that while her sons were out of their minds, my aunt was as cool and mellow as can be. She knew how to survive. It was the youngun's that couldn't hack it.
I stopped worrying about the old girl and guess what? She was as right as rain when the lights finally came back on.
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 04:24 pm
Now that Gustav is pretty much history (that is callous, I am sure, as many folks are still dealing with no power and damage), we on the east coast are looking at Hanna on Saturday and Sunday.
And the really scary one is Ike.
Please join us on the thread "Hanna, Ike and Josephine..." for Edgar and JPB's maps.
I don't like Ike.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 05:32 pm
Quote:
By Philip Rucker
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, September 5, 2008; 11:34 AM

The American Red Cross said this morning it is going deep into debt to fund a $70 million Hurricane Gustav relief effort, an unusual occurrence even as the nation's biggest disaster-aid charity braces for a trio of powerful storms lurking in the Atlantic.

The Red Cross has raised less than $5 million toward its Gustav expenses, officials said. To recoup its Gustav cost -- most of it borrowed money -- the nonprofit organization plans to roll out an aggressive national campaign Monday.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/09/05/AR2008090501624.html?hpid=topnews

WOW, the red cross is fucked. Not only are people less giving (IE have less to give), but RC is almost 20 years into substantiated claims that they have mismanaged the blood program. Contrary to popular assumption blood is the American Red crosses main business, which may be taken away because they resist and/or lack the capacity for good management.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 08:02 pm
@realjohnboy,
The fringes of Gustav reached Toronto today. Nice big waves at the beach, a bitta rain and drizzle. It was almost like a perfect day at the ocean.
0 Replies
 
OCCOM BILL
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2008 09:39 pm
@mac11,
Glad to hear mom's got her power back. I was living in a condo in Palm Beach when a cane took out the power. Happened twice in a row, actually, but one was much worse than the other: Our back up diesel for emergency hall lights and the elevators (only) failed as well. Mostly retired folks living there, in a 25 story complex. You can probably guess who got to chase those stairs for pills, keys and whatnot so they could get the hell out. Cool breezes off the water in Palm Beach, but it was still friggin hot. Plus, you get tired of eating uncooked crap. No power sucks.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Sep, 2008 11:55 am
Quote:
Never Again,’ Again


Published: September 20, 2008
Hurricane Gustav gave the state of Louisiana a test for which it had three years to prepare. There were thousands of poor, sick, disabled and elderly people who could not get out on their own. They needed to be rescued with dispatch, and sheltered in safety and dignity.

The state flunked.

Three years to the week after Hurricane Katrina’s landfall, Louisiana executed a fundamentally unfair evacuation plan and did it badly. It relied on dividing the population into separate streams: People with their own cars were directed to shelters run by parishes, churches and the Red Cross. People with medical problems not requiring hospitalization were taken to special shelters. Sex offenders had a shelter to themselves.

All those without a car or a ride were taken on state buses to four state-run warehouses. It was in these shelters, including two abandoned stores, a Wal-Mart and a Sam’s Club, that thousands of working-poor New Orleanians got a sickening reminder of Katrina.

Evacuees said they had had no idea where they were going; bus drivers would not tell them. When they arrived, there were not enough portable toilets, and no showers. For five days there was no way to bathe, except with bottled water in filthy outdoor toilets. Privacy in the vast open space " 1,000 people to a warehouse, shoulder-to-shoulder on cots " was nonexistent. The mood among evacuees was grim, surrounded as they were by police officers and the National Guard, with no visitors or reporters allowed.

“We didn’t want to evacuate into a prison,” Lethia Brooks told the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice, an organization that accompanied the evacuees, inspected the shelters and collected hundreds of stories into a report sharply critical of the state’s response.

Gustav ended up being no Katrina, and the week of suffering was not as severe as the deathly mayhem of three years ago. But residents had every right to expect far better treatment than they received. After a week of indignities in crowded, unsanitary shelters, many returned home with their fragile finances in turmoil. They had been forced to buy extra basics while out of their homes, and September rent was due.

The secretary of Louisiana’s Department of Social Services, which was responsible for the shelters, resigned after this scandal and one involving problems with food stamp distribution.

Now, many poor residents are vowing “never again,” as in, “Never again will we get on the bus to be warehoused. We’ll ride out the next storm.” In New Orleans, disaster is never far away, and government incompetence cannot be allowed to undermine a swift, sure evacuation. Gov. Bobby Jindal’s administration should move quickly on a better plan that does not expose the poor to differential, substandard treatment.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/21/opinion/21sun2.html?ref=opinion

I made similar claims once it was clear that people were not being allowed to return home in a timely manor. For Generations Louisiana refused to confront the corruption in the state, which is why state government does not work. New Orleans is the next Detroit, a once great city dieing before our eyes...rapidly
0 Replies
 
eoe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Sep, 2008 12:22 pm
@OCCOM BILL,
My folks in Houston just got their power back on last Thursday. Almost a week in the dark. No air. At least they were able to cook with gas but, who wants to heat up an airless house???

You do what you have to but geez...
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Sep, 2008 01:35 pm
@eoe,
mac11 just posted that she's on Day 9 of no power at home (she's posting from work)

I'd have a hard time with 7+ days of heat.
 

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