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POLLICE VERSO

 
 
George
 
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2008 12:48 pm
"Pollice verso" means "with thumb turned".
In certain contexts, it had negative connotations.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c5/Jean-Leon_Gerome_Pollice_Verso.jpg/800px-Jean-Leon_Gerome_Pollice_Verso.jpg

Yeah, George, just what we need, another "thumbs up, thumbs down" topic.
Sheesh.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 5,492 • Replies: 30
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Region Philbis
 
  0  
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2008 02:44 pm
@George,
thumbs up, dude...
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2008 02:54 pm
@George,
Consider then, mani pulite...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mani_Pulite
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2008 03:02 pm
@Region Philbis,
Reege wrote:
thumbs up, dude...
Thanks.
Now if that guy in the loincloth would only get his foot off my neck.
George
 
  0  
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2008 03:04 pm
@ossobuco,
osso wrote:
Consider then, mani pulite...

Consider it considered.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  0  
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2008 03:05 pm
George wrote:
Reege wrote:
thumbs up, dude...
Thanks.
Now if that guy in the loincloth would only get his foot off my neck.
looks like you've got him right where you want him...
0 Replies
 
Francis
 
  2  
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2008 03:10 pm
@ossobuco,
Pontius Pilate considered that, too...
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2008 03:17 pm
@Francis,
Frannie wrote:
Pontius Pilate considered that, too...

...which was rather inconsiderate of him...
0 Replies
 
Sglass
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2008 02:30 am
@George,
Were there lady gladiators? Those mammory glands look a little saggy to be male pecs.

Letty
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2008 03:23 am
@Sglass,
You forgot this thumb, George. Hi Sglass

http://french.about.com/library/graphics/gestures/g-pieddenez.jpg
George
 
  0  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2008 07:46 am
@Sglass,
PineapplePrincess wrote:
Were there lady gladiators? Those mammory glands look a little saggy to be male pecs.

That's what the guy on the ground said.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2008 07:48 am
@Letty,
Right back atcha, Letty!
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2008 08:12 am
@George,
George, the nose thumbing was for the thumbs up; thumbs down rating system. Not you.

Wink
Sglass
 
  0  
Reply Sun 24 Aug, 2008 01:33 am
@Letty,
hi there Letty.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Aug, 2008 05:13 am
@Letty,
Thanks, Letty.
I wonder how nose-thumbing started...
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Aug, 2008 05:38 am
@George,
Peggy Lee, I think. Razz

I did find this, George:

Dear Word Detective: I wonder whether you could throw any light on the origin and meaning of the phrase "to thumb your nose at somebody"? -- Stephen Davey, via the Internet.
Ah, your question reminds me of the good old days, when you could thumb your nose at someone and the worst you could expect in return was a bop on your own nose. Today, people are afraid to express even mild annoyance at a stranger for fear of being shot or otherwise seriously injured. Here in New York City, for instance, it's not considered a good idea to display anger at a driver who tries to run you down in a crosswalk, lest he or she back up and finish the job. I guess you're just supposed to smile and lie down in the street.
To "thumb your nose at someone" is actually a fairly straightforward description of a gesture that used to be known by a much more intriguing name -- "cocking a snook." It's a classic display of derision, properly performed by spreading the fingers of one hand, touching the tip of your nose with your thumb while sighting your opponent along the tips of your other fingers, and waggling your fingers in the most annoying way possible. As a gesture, it doesn't really mean anything, but it does convey utter contempt rather well. Like all fine insulting gestures, cocking a snook always goes well with a Bronx Cheer, or raspberry, as an accompaniment. Crossing your eyes while doing all this is optional but definitely enhances the overall effect. And remember, kids, practice makes perfect.
While the phrase "thumb one's nose" first appeared in English around 1903, "cocking a snook" is much older, first appearing in print back in 1791. The verb "to cock" comes from strutting behavior of male chickens, and means, as the Oxford English Dictionary puts it, "to turn up in an assertive, pretentious, jaunty, saucy, or defiant way." The "snook" is of uncertain origin, but may be related to "snout," which would certainly make sense.
George
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Aug, 2008 12:38 pm
@Letty,
Letty wrote:
"cocking a snook."

I LOVE IT!
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Aug, 2008 06:47 am
@George,
Hey, soccer. I dedicated a song to you on Rockhead's music thread.

Hope you do youtube.

http://able2know.org/topic/110042-316
George
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Aug, 2008 06:49 am
@Letty,
It won't get past the filter here at the Widget Factory, but I'll check it out at home tonight.
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2008 11:10 am
@George,
Just in case you forgot to listen, my furry friend, here are the lyrics:


I got me ten fine toes to wiggle in the sand,
Lots of idle fingers snap to my command,
A loverly pair of heels that kick to beat the band,
Contemplating nature can be fascinating,
Add to these A NOSE THAT I CAN THUMB and a mouth by gum have I
So tell the whole wide world, if you don't happen to like it,
Deal me out, thank you kindly, pass me by.

(musical interlude)

Pass me by
Pass me by
If you don't happen to like it pass me by

By Peggy Lee
 

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