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In Defense of Chopped Liver

 
 
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 08:00 am
e-brown wrote:
Liver is not a food... it is a punishment.

I must be a masochist, then...

Wanna some snails?
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 08:29 am
@Francis,
Chicken liver, Beef liver, Cod liver oil (was anyone else tortured with the stuff as children) ... it is all the same. When I was a kid, my parents decided that liver should be a regular part of our weekly dinner rotation-- they said it was for "iron", but I think it was some sort of character building thing to teach us that life isn't all good things (like steak and bacon).

Let me say something about cod liver oil. Whenever any of us kids complained about being sick, my mother would reach for the wretched stuff. Strangely it worked... we never complained about being sick-- we were the healthiest kids around (we may be the only kids who did tricks to lower the reading on a thermometer).

Snails are fine as food. Tongue and tripe are perfectly acceptable (and delicious when prepared well).

Liver's sole purpose is to filter poisons from a body so that they can be eliminated.
Francis
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 08:40 am
@ebrown p,
ebrown wrote:
Liver is designed to be a filter of poisons.

You just say what's interesting to the defense of your position.

But when the liver filters the poisons, does it keep them? or does it (the liver) deliver them somewhere else?

Why do so many people in the world eat liver?

Maybe because it's healthier than burgers...
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 08:48 am
@Francis,
Francis wrote:

ebrown wrote:
Liver is designed to be a filter of poisons.


Maybe because it's healthier than burgers...


Well, at least it contains a lot more of vitamins, especially vitamin A, B1 and B2, C and D.
0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 09:04 am
@Setanta,
The white bread might upset them, but the mayonnaise won't. They might hope you'd ask for a little mustard with that. If you really wanted to piss them off you'd ask for Miracle Whip.
0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 09:05 am
@dyslexia,
Quote:
No one higher than a cabbage on the food chain thinks miracle whip is a food product let alone a FINE food product.


Have you been to Indiana? Miracle Whip is a staple food there.
0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 09:06 am
@Setanta,
Goyum is correct.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 09:10 am
@Francis,
Sure I'll take some escargot, especially if its prepared in lots of garlic. Très délicieux!
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 10:31 am
@ehBeth,


thanks beth
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 11:47 am
@Francis,
It appears that there are some people on this panel, Francis, whose tastebuds have withered away and simply don't function any longer. Can you imagine a table of hors d'oevres sans pate? It's unthinkable. Well, perhaps in Indiana . . .
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 12:04 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Now that you talk about it, I don't remember seeing paté on the table (or on the menu) last time I was in Indianapolis back in 1997...
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 12:06 pm
@Francis,
... while my niece, who's there now already three months and will stay there for nine more, very happily has discovered a "restaurant" which has something close to ciabatta ...
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 12:09 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
So, now she has to discover a restaurant with ciabatta and paté..
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 12:10 pm
@Francis,
I don't know if a 16-years old is interested in real pâté ...
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 12:15 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
cabaret or -even better- a table roulante.
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 12:18 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Ok, she will have ciabatta with prosciutto...
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 12:34 pm
@Francis,
Well, I'm sure that they've pumpkin ham there ...
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 01:39 pm
I love pate. Is chopped liver chopped or mashed like pate?
I don't like liver when it's lumpy or whole. My mother used to make us eat kidney too... yeuch! It looked like horrible little black bullets in anything she put it in, like spaghetti sauce. ( the horrors!)
Gefelite fish - is it a particular type of fish or is the process? I'm allergic to fish, but I'm curious.

I didn't grow up with any Jewish people. I wasn't aware of the dietary restrictions. I was going to school in Quebec. One of my fellow students invited me to his home in Montreal. I helped his mom set the table and put butter on a meat plate. She graciously, picked up the plate and took it to the back yard, and began to dig a hole while wearing a dress. I asked her what she was doing. She said that she had to bury the plate. It was from a beautiful china set. I've never felt so stupid in my life. I offered to buy a new one, and she said not to worry. A Jewish girl would never help setting the table. I was a nice goyum, she let my indescretion slide.

If anybody understands this phenomenon, I would appreciate it being clarified. Why bury the plate? Can they dig it up after an appropriate ammount of time, or is it lost for good?
Thanks
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 02:23 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
cabaret or -even better- a table roulante.


Yes, it's connvenient. But why do they keep calling it a lazy Susan? Must be embarasing to women named Susan.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Oct, 2009 02:31 pm
@Merry Andrew,
From word-detective
Quote:
What we call a "Lazy Susan," a revolving serving tray usually used to dispense condiments or appetizers, was originally called a "dumbwaiter." Although the device itself dates back to at least the mid-eighteenth century, the name "Lazy Susan" cannot be verified earlier than about 1917. Many authorities recount the theory that the "Susan" was simply a common maid's name, and that the term "lazy Susan" applied to this self-service gadget was a sardonic reference to the supposed sloth of household servants. If this theory is true, it remains to be explained why the term was unknown in the 1700's, when servants were common, but suddenly appeared in the early 20th century, when they were not.

A more likely source for the term may be some anonymous advertising copywriter, using the repetition of the "z" sound in "Lazy" and "Susan" to invent a memorable term for a prosaic appliance, and perhaps even inventing the "lazy servant" story to boot. By the way, the English still call these doo-dads "dumbwaiters," a term that we in the U.S. now apply to the small food-service elevators found in very large houses and hotels.
0 Replies
 
 

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