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I Guess They Will Have to Pry his Cold, Dead Fingers...

 
 
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 09:38 am
RIP Charlton Heston Dead at 84

http://rawstory.com/images/new/heston.jpg
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 5,639 • Replies: 67
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hanno
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 10:56 am
0 Replies
 
Roxxxanne
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 11:36 am
Frisco?????????????/


I live in Northern California, not Northern Texas!


Well,let's see, they could bury him with that rifle he held up at the NRA convention after the Columbine tragedy. Now talk about having no respect for the dead...
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CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 11:39 am
Hey, I loved "Ben Hur" however, I am also looking forward to
gun control. Perhaps now, since the most famous spokesperson for
NRA has gone, we'll get someone more sensible to represent a new NRA -
No Riffle Association.
0 Replies
 
Roxxxanne
 
  0  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 11:41 am
Well,let's see, they could bury him with that rifle he held up at the NRA convention after the Columbine tragedy. Now talk about having no respect for the dead...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4f/Colddead-fp.jpg

I mourn his death, he did do some decent things for civil rights but my image of him that I will remember the most is the one above. That, and his bad wooden acting and over-acting.
0 Replies
 
Roxxxanne
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 11:44 am
CalamityJane wrote:
Hey, I loved "Ben Hur" however, I am also looking forward to
gun control. Perhaps now, since the most famous spokesperson for
NRA has gone, we'll get someone more sensible to represent a new NRA -
No Riffle Association.


LOL even in grade school, my sister and Iused to mock his over-acting in that film:

"It was an accident! an Accident!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"


Then there is always.

"Soylent green is people, it's Peeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee-pull!!!!
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CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 12:10 pm
Soylent Green was a great movie though - and the concept isn't that far
fetched, is it? Laughing
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hanno
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 12:42 pm
Roxxxanne wrote:
Frisco?????????????/


I live in Northern California, not Northern Texas!


Well,let's see, they could bury him with that rifle he held up at the NRA convention after the Columbine tragedy. Now talk about having no respect for the dead...


I never said respect, the word is not in my vocabulary as such - I laughed my ass off about Columbine, my whole honors English class thought it was a joke. There again you've illustrated the fundamental disconnect in our thinking. You see rules and consequences, what can I say you're parents probably had their act together maybe drove a Chrysler, whereas I see aesthetics. The aesthetic in question is whether you civic-heroes really feel it any more than I do when someone dies a thousand miles away, have the vision to solve the world's problems, or if you just think you know best for everyone.

Dig my avatar - generally seen to be a racist - but what makes racism ugly? We make the call on one another for a lot of reasons - but then if you make the call on someone because you think they're fundamentally inferior, lacking vision, not living right, every little thing you ain't, depending on how you arrived at that thought.... And if you're ready to make a thing about the fact that a man died, yeah it must really be a matter of principle for you. Gun owners are barefoot hillbillies, evangelicals, gangster wannabes, and rich guys with small junk right?

It wouldn't mean much, but this crusader-fallacy and the small mindedness it portends pervades liberalism - you've got the animal rights people unabashedly taking any cheap shot in the book but if they pushed themselves that hard for the sake of the wee creatures there'd be less blonde dreadlocks. It's like, the matter in question, guns, animals, poverty, peace, is supposed to be all important, enough so that swinging below the belt is in order, and it might be, but who are these mortal vessels who think they're more aligned with the flow of the universe than I? They look like fashionable kids and white-collars from the service sectorÂ…
0 Replies
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 01:37 pm
CalamityJane wrote:
Soylent Green was a great movie though - and the concept isn't that far
fetched, is it? Laughing


and probably not that far off :wink:
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 02:02 pm
You're probably right, Bear. Let's just hope they'll start at the Ranch in Texas...
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 03:35 pm
Roxxxanne wrote:
Well,let's see, they could bury him with that rifle he held up at the NRA convention after the Columbine tragedy. Now talk about having no respect for the dead...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4f/Colddead-fp.jpg

I mourn his death, he did do some decent things for civil rights but my image of him that I will remember the most is the one above. That, and his bad wooden acting and over-acting.




Shocking taste, Roxanne, but I am afraid I had to admit the cold, dead hands was the first thing I thought of when I heard about his death.


I hadn't heard he did anything for civil rights.....can you talk more about that? I just thought he was a pretty far right trophy for the likes of Bush, and a gun nut. Be interested to hear more about other things he did.
0 Replies
 
hanno
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 03:55 pm
Cold dead hands the first thing that came to mind? Then you're not viewing it in context. No one killed him to take his gun - he did his thing till the end - the day is his.

I despise this playground-rules crap - you'll call weakness weakness, in the sense that he's dead and that's bad for him, but someone wants to hold onto a little instrument of self defense and it's out of order.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 04:11 pm
hanno wrote:
Cold dead hands the first thing that came to mind? Then you're not viewing it in context. No one killed him to take his gun - he did his thing till the end - the day is his.

I despise this playground-rules crap - you'll call weakness weakness, in the sense that he's dead and that's bad for him, but someone wants to hold onto a little instrument of self defense and it's out of order.


Oh lighten up.

Anyone with any sense of proportion would see the "cold, dead, hands" bellow in that speech as intrinsically ironic and over the top......


What's "doing his thing till the end" got to do with anything? It was a dumb speech bound to get laughs at the time, and obviously his hands were gonna end up cold and dead at some point, just like yours and mine.

Nobody ever thought he was gonna die to defend his guns, and that was one of the things that made the phrase so ridiculous.


Wherever are you getting this nonsense:

"you'll call weakness weakness, in the sense that he's dead and that's bad for him"


Whoever called his dying "weakness"?

What on earth are you on about?


As for whether being dead is "bad for him" (a comment I cannot make any sense of at all in this context), I suppose a universal human fate can be regarded as bad, if one fears death greatly, but I see no reason to personalise this to Heston, especially as he died after a long life, which would seem pretty lucky given the fate awaiting many of us.


Perhaps you just can't appreciate black humour?


BTW, I would have found the "cold dead hands" thing just as ridiculous if I were opposed to gun laws. It was just plain laughable.


I was interested in hearing more about Heston than his gun nut stuff, btw.


You seem very fond of him, got anything interesting to say?
0 Replies
 
Roxxxanne
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2008 05:34 pm
I don't generally like to mock people when they die and, in all sincerity, there was an awful lot of good in this man. OTOH I think, in his later years, made a mockery of himself, (allowing Michael Moore to make a mockery of him as well, that was pretty sad on Moore's part)

Yes, Heston was one of the first of the Hollywood types to support Civil Rights:

Quote:
Heston campaigned for Presidential candidate Adlai Stevenson in 1956 and John F. Kennedy in 1960.[10] When an Oklahoma movie theater premiering his movie was segregated, he joined a picket line outside in 1961.[11] During the civil rights march held in Washington, D.C. in 1963, he accompanied Martin Luther King Jr. In later speeches, Heston said he helped the civil rights cause "long before Hollywood found it fashionable."[12]

In 1968, following the assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy, Heston appeared on The Joey Bishop Show and, along with fellow actors Gregory Peck, Kirk Douglas and James Stewart, called for public support for President Johnson's Gun Control Act of 1968.[13][14] He opposed the Vietnam War and said he voted for Richard Nixon in 1972.[15]

By the 1980s, Heston opposed affirmative action, supported gun rights and changed his political affiliation from Democratic to Republican.[16] He campaigned for Republicans and Republican Presidents Ronald Reagan,[17] George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush.[18]

Heston resigned from Actors Equity, claiming the union's refusal to allow a white actor to play a Eurasian role in "Miss Saigon" was "obscenely racist."[19] He said CNN's telecasts from Baghdad were "sowing doubts" about the allied effort in the 1990-91 Gulf War.[19]

At a Time Warner stockholders meeting, he castigated the company for releasing an Ice-T album which included the song "Cop Killer", which depicted the killing of police officers.[20]

According to his autobiography In the Arena, Heston recognized the right of freedom of speech exercised by others. In a 1997 speech, he rhetorically deplored a culture war he said was being conducted by a generation of media, educators, entertainers, and politicians against:

"...the God fearing, law-abiding, Caucasian, middle- class Protestant-or even worse, evangelical Christian, Midwestern or Southern- or even worse, rural, apparently straight-or even worse, admitted heterosexuals, gun-owning-or even worse, NRA-card-carrying, average working stiff-or even worse, male working stiff-because, not only don't you count, you are a down-right obstacle to social progress. Your voice deserves a lower decibel level, your opinion is less enlightened, your media access is insignificant, and frankly, mister, you need to wake up, wise up, and learn a little something from your new-America and until you do, would you mind shutting up?"[21]

In an address to students at Harvard Law School entitled Winning the Cultural War, Heston expressed his disdain for political correctness, stating "If Americans believed in political correctness, we'd still be King George's boys - subjects bound to the British crown."[22] He stated "Political correctness is tyranny with manners".[23] He went on to say that white pride is just as valid as black pride or red pride or anyone else's pride.
Heston accepting a presentation rifle at 2000 NRA convention with the now well-known exclamation "From my cold, dead hands!"
Heston accepting a presentation rifle at 2000 NRA convention with the now well-known exclamation "From my cold, dead hands!"

Heston was the President and spokesman of the NRA from 1998 until he resigned in 2003. At the 2000 NRA convention, he raised a rifle over his head and declared that the Bill Clinton administration would take away his Second Amendment rights "from my cold, dead hands."[24] In announcing his resignation in 2003, he again raised a rifle over his head, repeating the five famous words of his 2000 speech.[24] He was an honorary life member.[25][26]

In the 2002 documentary film Bowling for Columbine, Michael Moore interviewed Heston in his home, asking him about an April, 1999 NRA meeting held in Denver, Colorado, shortly after the Columbine high school massacre. Moore criticized Heston for the perceived thoughtlessness in the timing and location of the meeting. Heston, on-camera, excused himself and walked out on the interview. Moore was later criticized for his perceived ambush of the actor.[27][28]

Actor George Clooney joked about Heston having Alzheimer's Disease. When questioned, Clooney said Heston deserved whatever was said about him for his involvement with the NRA.[29] Heston responded by saying Clooney lacked "class," and said he felt sorry for Clooney, as Clooney had as much of a chance of developing Alzheimer's as anyone else.[30]

Heston opposed abortion and gave the introduction to a 1987 pro-life documentary by Bernard Nathanson called Eclipse of Reason which focuses on late-term abortions. Heston served on the Advisory Board of Accuracy in Media, a conservative media watchdog group founded by Reed Irvine.

---wikipedia
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2008 12:18 am
dlowan wrote:
Roxxxanne wrote:
Well,let's see, they could bury him with that rifle he held up at the NRA convention after the Columbine tragedy. Now talk about having no respect for the dead...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4f/Colddead-fp.jpg

I mourn his death, he did do some decent things for civil rights but my image of him that I will remember the most is the one above. That, and his bad wooden acting and over-acting.




Shocking taste, Roxanne, but I am afraid I had to admit the cold, dead hands was the first thing I thought of when I heard about his death.


I hadn't heard he did anything for civil rights.....can you talk more about that?


The NRA is one of America's leading civil rights organizations.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2008 12:18 am
CalamityJane wrote:
Hey, I loved "Ben Hur" however, I am also looking forward to
gun control. Perhaps now, since the most famous spokesperson for
NRA has gone, we'll get someone more sensible to represent a new NRA -
No Riffle Association.


The chances of the NRA ever dropping their defense of our freedom are about zero.
0 Replies
 
Roxxxanne
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2008 12:27 am
Quote:
The NRA is one of America's leading civil rights organizations.



Oh really o-ralloy? Would you point me to an amicus brief or two filed on the NRAs behalf in defense of say, First or Fourth Amendment Rights, other thatn those pertaining to gun rights?
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2008 12:44 am
Roxxxanne wrote:
Quote:
The NRA is one of America's leading civil rights organizations.



Oh really o-ralloy? Would you point me to an amicus brief or two filed on the NRAs behalf in defense of say, First or Fourth Amendment Rights, other thatn those pertaining to gun rights?


The NRA doesn't defend every civil right -- they mostly just focus on our gun-related civil rights. But they did make some free speech claims against campaign finance laws I believe.

The ACLU doesn't defend every civil right either. When was the last time they defended someone's gun rights?

The only organization I know of who would defend all our civil rights is the Libertarian Party.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2008 01:05 am
oralloy wrote:
dlowan wrote:
Roxxxanne wrote:
Well,let's see, they could bury him with that rifle he held up at the NRA convention after the Columbine tragedy. Now talk about having no respect for the dead...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4f/Colddead-fp.jpg

I mourn his death, he did do some decent things for civil rights but my image of him that I will remember the most is the one above. That, and his bad wooden acting and over-acting.




Shocking taste, Roxanne, but I am afraid I had to admit the cold, dead hands was the first thing I thought of when I heard about his death.


I hadn't heard he did anything for civil rights.....can you talk more about that?


The NRA is one of America's leading civil rights organizations.


That's certainly one possible viewpoint.
0 Replies
 
vid
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2008 02:51 am
Who once commented that Chuck must have graduated from the Mount Rushmore school of acting? Was it Orson Welles?

Bitingly funny, anyways.
0 Replies
 
 

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