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Texas church cancels funeral for gay man

 
 
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Sep, 2007 08:33 pm
mesquite wrote:
neologist wrote:
mesquite wrote:
In the land of make believe anything is possible.

Are you saying that the curse on the serpent was symbolic, but that the curses on Adam and Eve were literal?


The relevant curse on the serpent is the forthcoming 'head wound'.

The 'heel wound' has already been endured.


14 And the LORD God said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life:
15 And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it [he] shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.


You claim the serpent in this story was a person, yet God cursed serpents to be on their belly. Why would God punish all serpents into perpetuity simply for being impersonated? Then there is the matter of enmity. I suspect that there has been quite a lot of bruising of both heads and heels over the years.
I have yet to meet a snake who feels as if his belly perspective is a punishment, so maybe it was just a consequence. I'll keep asking every snake I see just in case.

Wait!

Sid!

Seymour!

Hold on, I want to ask you something.

Be right back . . .
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mesquite
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Sep, 2007 11:20 pm
neologist wrote:
I have yet to meet a snake who feels as if his belly perspective is a punishment, so maybe it was just a consequence.


It is beginning to look as though you are trying to get around the question I posed, "Why would God punish all serpents into perpetuity simply for being impersonated?" by inferring that snakes were in actuality not punished.

If that be the case, what do the words in verse 14 mean to you?

14 And the LORD God said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life:
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neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Sep, 2007 01:00 am
You're a hoot, Skeeter.

I think the garden slug has it much worse, 'n he didn't do nuthin'.
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mesquite
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Sep, 2007 10:41 am
I can see it now... Moses slaps his forehead and mutters "Now why didn't I think of that? Upon thy own slime shalt thou go would have been much more powerful."

But the Bible is what it is, so let me ask the question again.

If not punishment, what do the words in verse 14 mean to you?
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neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Sep, 2007 10:13 pm
IMO, strictly symbolic. Although the prophecy about the head wound applied not to any serpent in particular, but to the one appearing as a serpent.

I could be wrong on this. But you are wrongier . . .

Hmm. I thought I had invented a word; but others are using it.
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tinygiraffe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Sep, 2007 11:17 pm
i have to agree with some of neo's logic there. i don't necessarily agree with his premises or conclusions, of course.
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mesquite
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Sep, 2007 11:47 pm
Symbolic of what , neo?
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neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 07:12 am
tinygiraffe wrote:
i have to agree with some of neo's logic there. i don't necessarily agree with his premises or conclusions, of course.
Well, you are wrongier, too.
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tinygiraffe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 07:38 am
well you're farcicalier then Razz
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neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 10:11 am
I think you're lying about coming from an egg
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tinygiraffe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 02:16 pm
the giraffe came first.
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mesquite
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 02:37 pm
mesquite wrote:
If not punishment, what do the words in verse 14 mean to you?


neologist wrote:
IMO, strictly symbolic. Although the prophecy about the head wound applied not to any serpent in particular, but to the one appearing as a serpent.


tinygiraffe wrote:
i have to agree with some of neo's logic there. i don't necessarily agree with his premises or conclusions, of course.


mesquite wrote:
Symbolic of what , neo?


neologist wrote:




Well tinygiraffe, since you agree with something of neo's logic and neo appears to have declined to answer my simple question, perhaps you would offer an opinion as to what is symbolized by the verbage in Genesis 3:14?

14 And the LORD God said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life:
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tinygiraffe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 03:06 pm
the reason you don't see me launching into theories about symbolism in the old testament very often is that some of it (like in this case) seems less relevant to biblical discussions (of the sort people normally get into, like this one) and more to comparative religion. serpent could mean all kinds of things, it's a symbol much older than the bible.

i don't think a serpent talked to the first people on earth, but that doesn't mean i assume the story is meaningless. i don't know what it is supposed to mean, but i'm certain it's symbolic of at least one of many things. that's the part i agree with.
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neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 06:48 pm
mesquite wrote:
neologist wrote:



There. Ya see?
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mesquite
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 07:34 pm
Yep, no surprises.
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mesquite
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 07:42 pm
tinygiraffe wrote:
i don't think a serpent talked to the first people on earth, but that doesn't mean i assume the story is meaningless. i don't know what it is supposed to mean, but i'm certain it's symbolic of at least one of many things. that's the part i agree with.


Profound!
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2007 09:55 pm
You assume that God was talking to a snake. But no animal would be able to understand the issues involved. The serpent, or snake, always traveled on its belly.

God, of course, was cursing the individual who appeared as a serpent and caused Eve and Adam to rebel. He was cast out of God's life sustaining organization and would eat dust figuratively until bruised in the head.
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mesquite
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2007 12:19 am
neologist wrote:
You assume that God was talking to a snake. But no animal would be able to understand the issues involved.
Well, you know old Moses did go out of his way to clarify that point when he said in Genesis 3:1 "Now the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field which the LORD God had made."

neologist wrote:
The serpent, or snake, always traveled on its belly.
Did it also always talk? If not, seems like a pretty poor choice of disguise wouldn't ya think?.
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neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2007 12:51 am
Do you actually think the serpent talked? Or did it just appear to talk?










Do you need a hint?
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tinygiraffe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2007 03:00 am
mesquite wrote:
tinygiraffe wrote:
i don't think a serpent talked to the first people on earth, but that doesn't mean i assume the story is meaningless. i don't know what it is supposed to mean, but i'm certain it's symbolic of at least one of many things. that's the part i agree with.


Profound!


Razz
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