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ANY VALUE IN SPORTS ?

 
 
Reply Sat 21 Jul, 2007 11:47 am
In another thread,
someone said that during my boyhood,
I shud have participated in " Little League ".

I rejected such invitations.
I saw no merit in competition to prove
which group can run around in circles better than which other group; waste of time n attention.
I knew that no matter which side wins,
it wins nothing, and no matter who loses, he loses nothing;
the purest essence of FUTILITY ( unless thay bet ).

If thay wish to wager,
then thay 'll be better off starting a crap game, playing poker,
or ( my personal favorite ): attending a casino.
In the deathless words of Elvis Presley: " VIVA LAS VEGAS "; love it.
My ball game of choice is Roulette.



Anyway, I see the benefits of PRODUCTIVE sports like
deer hunting, fishing, swimming, archery, gunnery practice,
armed and unarmed combat tactical skills for personal defense.
Skydiving might be fun; a little risky.
I see the value of lifting weight for strength,
or of calisthenics to promote somatic health.

Some folks say that team based sports teach teamwork.
I suppose that cud be possible; seems like a timeconsuming way to learn it.








Many people follow competitive ball games, like a cult.

WHAT the hell's the point ?



I have no preference as to which group of strangers
will prevail over which other group of people with whom I have no acquaintance.
I do not understand Y someone shud tell me
that I shud have joined the " Little League " or any other size league.

David
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Slappy Doo Hoo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jul, 2007 12:37 pm
Are you serious?

For kids, it teaches fitness, friendly competition, discipline, goal setting/achieving, recognition for success, teamwork, and puts them in a great social setting, where they can meet friends.

But eh, having kids sit in the house playing video games and getting fat has the same value. Or shooting a gun in the backyard.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jul, 2007 01:29 pm
Slappy Doo Hoo wrote:
Are you serious?

For kids, it teaches fitness, friendly competition, discipline, goal setting/achieving, recognition for success, teamwork, and puts them in a great social setting, where they can meet friends.

But eh, having kids sit in the house playing video games and getting fat has the same value.

Or shooting a gun in the backyard.

There survives a letter from Thomas Jefferson,
our 3rd President, Author of the Declaration of Independence,
Purchaser of the Louisiana Purchase, and founder of The University of Virginia,
to his 12-year-old nephew in which he reminds the boy
to always take his gun with him when he goes out for a walk,
and to practice with it for proficiency. He recommended gunnery practice over ball games.


At a dinner honoring Noble Prize Laureates, John Kennedy once said
that " the White House hasn't seen this concentration of sheer human genius
since Thomas Jefferson dined here alone. "
0 Replies
 
happycat
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jul, 2007 01:46 pm
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Slappy Doo Hoo wrote:
Are you serious?

For kids, it teaches fitness, friendly competition, discipline, goal setting/achieving, recognition for success, teamwork, and puts them in a great social setting, where they can meet friends.

But eh, having kids sit in the house playing video games and getting fat has the same value.

Or shooting a gun in the backyard.

There survives a letter from Thomas Jefferson,
our 3rd President, Author of the Declaration of Independence,
Purchaser of the Louisiana Purchase, and founder of The University of Virginia,
to his 12-year-old nephew in which he reminds the boy
to always take his gun with him when he goes out for a walk,
and to practice with it for proficiency. He recommended gunnery practice over ball games.


At a dinner honoring Noble Prize Laureates, John Kennedy once said
that " the White House hasn't seen this concentration of sheer human genius
since Thomas Jefferson dined here alone. "



There you go again David; talking history and kids with guns as if it were today. WAKE UP! It's 2007!

I think that the thousands of kids and their families, as well as many psychologists could give you plenty of reasons for playing sports. There are many more people that play sports than think like you.


Oh and Slappy, I'm beginning to think that he can't really be serious....that he's just doing this to yank some chains.
0 Replies
 
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jul, 2007 02:07 pm
My eldest son is a boxer, and my youngest has started fencing (i.e. fighting with swords).

I assume these (as martial arts) qualify.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jul, 2007 03:18 pm
ebrown_p wrote:
My eldest son is a boxer, and my youngest has started fencing (i.e. fighting with swords).

I assume these (as martial arts) qualify.

Yes.
Thay qualify.
I deem these both as productive sports.
Thay shud both improve co ordination,
and be helpful in self defense.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jul, 2007 03:28 pm
happycat wrote:
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Slappy Doo Hoo wrote:
Are you serious?

For kids, it teaches fitness, friendly competition, discipline, goal setting/achieving, recognition for success, teamwork, and puts them in a great social setting, where they can meet friends.

But eh, having kids sit in the house playing video games and getting fat has the same value.

Or shooting a gun in the backyard.

There survives a letter from Thomas Jefferson,
our 3rd President, Author of the Declaration of Independence,
Purchaser of the Louisiana Purchase, and founder of The University of Virginia,
to his 12-year-old nephew in which he reminds the boy
to always take his gun with him when he goes out for a walk,
and to practice with it for proficiency. He recommended gunnery practice over ball games.


At a dinner honoring Noble Prize Laureates, John Kennedy once said
that " the White House hasn't seen this concentration of sheer human genius
since Thomas Jefferson dined here alone. "



There you go again David; talking history and kids with guns as if it were today. WAKE UP! It's 2007!

I think that the thousands of kids and their families, as well as many psychologists could give you plenty of reasons for playing sports. There are many more people that play sports than think like you.


Oh and Slappy, I'm beginning to think that he can't really be serious....that he's just doing this to yank some chains.

In 2007, we have BETTER guns than we did B4.

I encountered a troop of Boyscouts at a gunnery range.
I showed them my ordnance ( I had about 5 pieces )
and gave their Scoutmaster $300.oo for ice cream and ammunition.
Thay sent me a thank u card, signed by all of them.
David
0 Replies
 
Coolwhip
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jul, 2007 03:43 pm
I've never understood the fascination with watching sports, I find it to be a pretty primitive form of entertainment. Participating is a different story.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jul, 2007 08:30 pm
Coolwhip wrote:
I've never understood the fascination with watching sports,
I find it to be a pretty primitive form of entertainment. Participating is a different story.

I agree with u.
David
0 Replies
 
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 07:30 am
baseball improves hand eye coordination, you run alot, and you are competing.( any form of competition makes you more aware of your opponent)

professional baseball players make milliions.


little league? unless your in love with the sport it is pointless to play baseball when your little so you can go pro.

Id rather learn coordination and get fit through more direct means though.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 07:37 am
Yes, they're fun.

I like just about all sports. Women's pro volleyball is one of my faves! Very Happy

http://static.flickr.com/98/227244574_41887c68c9.jpg
0 Replies
 
Montana
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 08:40 am
I've never been much into sports, although, when I was younger I did get into wrestling, baseball, hockey, and basketball for a while.

These days I find sports to be boring
0 Replies
 
Gargamel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 09:05 am
Coolwhip wrote:
I've never understood the fascination with watching sports, I find it to be a pretty primitive form of entertainment. Participating is a different story.


Primitive? You give our species too much credit.

And if participating is a different story, wouldn't observing most human activities be considered primitive?

Let's come right out and say it. There are plenty of sports fans who a few beers can render slobbering monkeys, hooting after the phenomenon of matter colliding with matter.

Then there are those of us who like to sip a few in the stands, and chill, and appreciate the coordination and training it takes to wait on a curveball and smash that **** 400 feet into the stands.
0 Replies
 
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 09:09 am
You say the most important thing in life is fun, is that not what people play baseball for?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 09:15 am
Gargamel wrote:
Then there are those of us who like to sip a few in the stands, and chill, and appreciate the coordination and training it takes to wait on a curveball and smash that **** 400 feet into the stands.


I find basketball boring and repetitive--up and down, up and down--but i really love watching baseball. I think that is precisely because i played so much ball as a kid, and know just what kind of skills are required. If you go to a ball game (baseball, basketball, football), you are seeing some of the greatest practitioners of those sports, and if you appreciate the skills required, you'll enjoy it so much more.

Recently, my Sweetiepie Girl and i attended a game between the Blue Jays and the Rangers. Sammie Sosa is back with Texas now, where he started. I was hoping to see him belt one out, but he didn't. Nevertheless, it was a pleasure to see the skills displayed, and the respect shown to Sammie even this late in his career, when they pitched out to walk him because they didn't want to serve him a fast ball on a platter, so he could put it in the upper deck.

A lot of sports leave me cold--but i always love watching baseball.
0 Replies
 
Gargamel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 10:43 am
What was great about a hitter like Hank Aaron was that he watched hours upon hours of film of opposing pitchers. He observed what unintentional cues pitchers gave in their delivery that betrayed what pitch was coming.

And at the plate, he could make the adjustment in a split second and with lightning quick wrists get the bat around.

Bonds is the same way. And that's a talent you can't get from steroids.
0 Replies
 
Slappy Doo Hoo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 11:14 am
Gwynn was also a videotape freak. Manny Ramirez is also a fun at-bat to watch. Even when he's intenionally swinging for the fences, his head stays almost completely still through the swing.

You know what else is a fun sport? Beer pong. Teamwork, competition, and blacking out.
0 Replies
 
Gargamel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 11:23 am
What I love about Manny is his nonchalance. He steps to the plate like he just woke up, and like the opposing pitcher is barely worth acknowledging. Until the windup. Then he gets this, "Let's go muthafukka" stare and swings REALLY hard.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 11:35 am
The difference between Aaron and Bonds is that when Hank showed up at the clubhouse, he was often mistaken for the janitor. That never happens to Bonds. When Barry walks into a room, objects go into orbit around him.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2007 02:38 pm
One value to sports, whether it's for boys or men, is giving them a topic to talk about, which allows for male bonding. Women bond over all sorts of topics - children, birthdays, deaths, illnesses, hair styles, fashion, etc., etc., etc. Men only have sports. What can they talk about otherwise, without making another male uneasy? Can't compliment another male on his flannel shirt, or his baseball cap!
Men only have sports to talk about, unless they talk about a job situation they are both familiar with or cars (sensitive topic if one can afford a better car). Sports serves a mental health function for men, I believe. It makes men feel masculine and might just be one of the few male topics that they are allowed to show "emotion," without feeling like they are becoming effeminate by being emotional!
Nowadays women talk sports too. That's good. Finally a woman can talk emotionally to a man and the man will listen! He'll even like her more for her interest in sports.
For those that aren't interested in sports talk - Hey, it's a big world, and we're all entitled to an opinion.
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