Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2007 11:49 am
I'm thinking of buying one. I've seen some that cost $10 and others that cost $30, and the only difference I can discern between the two is that one of them is made by Bodum and one of them isn't.

Is the $30 one more expensive because it's made by Bodum? Is there a difference in quality that I should be aware of? What makes a bad French press bad?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,838 • Replies: 8
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2007 12:57 pm
Is that the same as the thing they call a cafétière?

http://www.cookware-online.co.uk/ishop/images/930/smart_cafe_hot_cafetiere.jpg

Well, I've seen cheap ones splinter when I pressed down, pouring boiling hot coffee and glass shards all over the table. Bodum is a good brand, if a little pricey.

It was actually invented in Italy by Attilio Calimani from Milan, although French marketing companies made it well known in the 1950s.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2007 01:04 pm
"Cafetière à piston Chambord" :wink:
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Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2007 01:18 pm
That is indeed the very device of which I speak. I was talking with a friend who has also been hunting for one and I mentioned the $10 one I saw at the store. She gave me a disapproving look and said something like, "I'm looking for a good press, not one where it's done all wrong." I didn't want to reveal the extent of my ignorance so I didn't ask her what it means for a cafétière to be "done wrong," but I've been wondering ever since.
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2007 02:03 pm
Thin glass that is not toughened properly is one thing I would avoid for the reason I mentioned above. Those $10 Chinese ones are kind of fragile. You get what you pay for.
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2007 02:47 pm
true...I had one that shattered when I poured boiling water in it Crying or Very sad
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2007 02:58 pm
Just look to see that the glass is pyrex. We use these all the time and the pricey ones arent any better. I get annoyed at paying top dollar only to have the handle separate from the frame.
Ever since the melamine thing, we carefully look to see whether anything that we use to touch food , or food itself, is not imported from China.
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Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2007 05:26 pm
contrex wrote:
Well, I've seen cheap ones splinter when I pressed down, pouring boiling hot coffee and glass shards all over the table. Bodum is a good brand, if a little pricey.


panzade wrote:
true...I had one that shattered when I poured boiling water in it


Yikes. I'll keep that in mind!
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jul, 2007 03:21 am
Personally I prefer these things. Those press down things can make the coffee awfully "stewed" in flavor, since they encourage over-long brewing and there is no real separation of the brewed coffee from the grounds once the brewing is over, and unless the filter section is super good, the coffee can get kind of gritty. Just my $0.02 worth.

http://www.gallacoffee.co.uk/acatalog/moka-stovetop.jpg
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