southerngentleman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 04:41 pm
The only time I really like artichokes are when they're in spinich dip!!! Very Happy I love the stuff!
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 04:56 pm
Only time I like spinach is raw, in salad.
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 05:55 pm
If you are anywhere near Pescadero, CA you have to have the artichoke soup at Duarte's http://www.duartestavern.com/menu.html It's amazing.


I found a recipe here: http://www.elise.com/recipes/archives/000261artichoke_soup.php

I haven't tried it to see how close it is.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 06:39 pm
You do know an artichoke is a thistle, dont you?
0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 06:51 pm
You can buy them frozen for a reasonable price at Trader Joe's. Granted, they're not as good as the fresh artichokes, especially in texture, nonetheless, they're decent.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 06:59 pm
I didn't know it was a thistle, but, I can see how it could be.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 10:02 pm
The artichoke flower is a beauty...
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 10:17 pm
Swimpy wrote:
If you are anywhere near Pescadero, CA you have to have the artichoke soup at Duarte's http://www.duartestavern.com/menu.html It's amazing.


I found a recipe here: http://www.elise.com/recipes/archives/000261artichoke_soup.php

I haven't tried it to see how close it is.





That's wild. We used to go to Duarte's on weekend afternoons all the time -- especially in late fall, when there was fog on the coast. A friend (an older friend) had horrible problems with sodium and cholesterol, and was on a very restrictive diet and a fanatical exercise regimen just to stay alive. His Saturday routine was to walk the miles of meadow between his house north of Bonny Doon and Duarte's and actually eat some restaurant food. His tasty food for the week.

His house was a piece of work, too, now that I remember it. Beuatiful low shake-shingle house and a two-story guest-house made out of a giant wine barrel. All on this vast track of Scottish-heath-looking land overlooking the PCH between Santa Cruz and Pescadero. Bought the land with the guys who founded Odwalla back in the '70s. By the time I knew him the land was absurdly valuable, but he loved it and kept it and stayed on at his modest professorship. Stayed at the house when he was gone a couple of times. Absolutely beautiful place.
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 10:23 pm
No, wait, that wasn't Duarte's. Duarte's is inland. This place is right on Highway 1...
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 11:26 pm
Artichoke flowers are very beautiful when they are in full bloom. Do a Google Image search on artichoke flowers and you'll see the many varieties of artichokes in bloom.

Castroville, on the coast in Monterey county is known as the artichoke capital of the world. Nothing taste like freshly picked artichokes. Much like fresh corn on the cob, the taste is not the same once they've sat around in a grocery store for awhile.

Artichokes are a very special treat for me because they are so expensive. I've prepared them in many ways, boiling in water, steamed, fried, baked and deep fried. The very best way I like them is microwaved. You prepare the choke as usual, removing the thorns and inner choke, rinse it in water and try not to lose any of the water while you stuff some slices of garlic and herbs between the layers of leaves and wrap it up in plastic wrap. Stick it in a microwave for about 10 minutes and you're all set. Doesn't take the usual 45 minutes to cook and steams right there in the wrap with the residual water and has all the flavor of the garlic and herbs steamed into it.

If you can't afford artichokes, especially at the beginning of the season when they are the huge jumbo variety, look for the smaller varieties in mid and late season. They're less expensive and have more flavor.

A good, less expensive and less flavorful substitute is the Sunchoke or Jerusalem artichoke. It is a root vegetable akin to the sunflower and has a taste reminiscent of an artichoke heart.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 11:29 pm
I still have some artichoke seeds from Italy in '99, grew them in Eureka, three years after the package date. Wonder if they'll make it here in blazeville...

Stay tuned..
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2007 11:50 pm
Ever wonder what an artichoke plant looks like?

http://www.pezzinifarms.com/





When artichokes aren't in season and very expensive, a good way to recapture their flavor is to make that wonderful artichoke and parmesan cheese dip from frozen artichoke hearts.

Here's a couple good ones:

HOT ARTICHOKE DIP

1 (14 oz.) can artichoke hearts or bottoms, drained
1 c. freshly grated Parmesan cheese
8 oz. cream cheese, at room temperature
1/2 c. mayonnaise, preferably homemade
1/2 tsp. dried dill
1/4 tsp. minced garlic

1. Heat oven to 400 degrees.
2. Place half the artichoke hearts in food processor; chop coarsely. Add half the Parmesan cheese, cream cheese, mayonnaise, dillweed and garlic; process until smooth. Scrape mixture into 10" pie plate. Repeat procedure with remaining half of the ingredients, adding to pie plate after processing. Smooth top with spatula; bake until hot and bubbly, about 15 minutes. Serve immediately, with bread sticks.

TIP: Or spoon artichoke mixture into fresh mushroom caps (about 3 pounds, wiped clean). Brush edges of caps with melted butter and place on baking sheet; bake in 400 degree oven for about 15 minutes. Serve immediately. The dip can also be served without baking, at room temperature or cold.

Artichoke Dip

INGREDIENTS:
1 can artichoke hearts, drained, about 14 to 15 ounces
2 tablespoons finely chopped onion
1/3 cup mayonnaise
juice of 1/2 lemon, about 1 to 1 1/2 tablespoons
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
4 slices bacon, cooked, drained, crumbled
salt and pepper, to taste
PREPARATION:
Drain and mash the artichoke hearts; combine well with the onion, mayonnaise, lemon juice, and cayenne. Add the crumbled bacon to the artichoke mixture. Taste and add salt and pepper as desired. Chill before serving. Serve with toasted, thinly sliced French baguettes, crackers, or my favorite blue corn chips.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 Mar, 2007 12:54 am
Me, I'd avoid the bacon and try to make the mayo from scratch (or not), and use real reggiano parmigiano, worth every cent. Still, that all tastes good...

Though in real life, I like the artchoke bits by themselves, with this or that.
Get really fresh artichokes, go for it, you don't need all this coating... or any jarring.
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 Mar, 2007 09:30 am
patiodog wrote:
No, wait, that wasn't Duarte's. Duarte's is inland. This place is right on Highway 1...


's ok. It was still a good story. I hope to get out that way again sometime. Such beautiful country.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 Mar, 2007 09:56 am
Artichoke Soup
Recipe for Artichoke Soup
by BumbleBeeBoogie

The artichoke producing capital of the U.S., Salinas, California, is only 75 miles from my former home and I often stopped in my travels at one of the restaurants specializing in artichoke dishes. This is one of my favorites that is made easier for those of you not living near fresh artichoke farms.

6 to 8 canned or frozen artichoke bottoms, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
3/4 cups minced onions
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
6 cups chicken stock
12 ounces Brie cheese, rind removed
6 tablespoons Sherry or Madeira
1 tablespoon fine herbs or finely chopped flat Italian parsley
salt and freshly ground white or black pepper, to taste
additional liquid as needed: milk, cream, and/or chicken stock

In a saucepan, saute the onions in the butter until tender and translucent.

Add the flour and mix well. Add the artichoke bottoms, lemon juice and chicken stock and simmer for 30 minutes. Puree the mixture with a hand blender or in a food processor. Return the mixture to the saucepan. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat and add the sale and pepper to taste. Stir in the Brie cheese in small pieces; add the Sherry or Madeira and blend thoroughly.

Thin, if necessary with recommended thinners.

Ladle the soup into soup bowls ad sprinkle the surface with the fine herbs or parsley
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 Mar, 2007 10:00 am
Artichoke puree over asparagus, green beans & cucumber
Recipe for Artichoke puree served with fresh asparagus, green beans and cucumber.

Makes about 750 mls (three cups) puree.
Preparation 20 minutes.
Cooking 8 minutes.

Ingredients:

3-4 bunches (about 30 stems) fresh asparagus, ends trimmed.

350 grams green beans, topped.

6 Lebanese cucumbers, cut into sticks.

For the artichoke puree:

2 285 gram jars artichoke hearts in olive oil.

80 mls (one third of a cup) thick cream.

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.



1. To make the artichoke puree, pour artichokes and their oil into the bowl of a food processor and process until smooth. Pour into an airtight container. Add cream, salt and pepper and mix well. Taste, and adjust seasoning if necessary. Cover, and place in fridge until needed.

2. To prepare the vegetables, bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil. Add half the asparagus spears and cook for 2 minutes or until bright green. Remove from the water with a slotted spoon, and transfer to a bowl of iced water to refresh until cold. Return the water to the boil, and repeat with the remaining asparagus spears.

3. Return the water to the boil, add the beans and cook for 1 - 2 minutes, or until bright green. Drain, and place in a bowl of iced water until cold. Drain.

4. Spoon the artichoke puree into a serving bowl and place in the centre of a serving plate. Arange the asparagus and beans and cucumber around the bowl. Cover loosely with a clean damp cloth or tea-towel until ready to serve.
0 Replies
 
Joahaeyo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Apr, 2007 03:33 pm
I can't believe everyone's favorite place to put artichokes isn't PIZZA?!?!?!

I love it, and they many of the options at our popular pizza joint have artichokes in them. Yummy.

I also have the BEST artichoke chicken recipe. Oh so good.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Apr, 2007 06:19 pm
No, on Pizza I like anchovies.

Give us your artichoke-chicken recipe, Joa, I'd like to try it.

The artichoke soup sounds really good, I've got to try that too.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Apr, 2007 06:26 pm
To me, liking as I do artichokes, I think they ruin a pizza if splattered about... Perhaps delicious once and then you never need to hear the word again. Less is more. (agreeing with CJ.)
0 Replies
 
Joahaeyo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Apr, 2007 06:45 pm
Here you go! Hop you like it as much as I do! Smile



4 boneless chicken breast halves
1 (15oz) can artichoke drained (squeeze before chopping to get as much liquid out as possible) and chopped
3/4C Parmesan cheese
3/4C mayo
few dashes of garlic pepper

oven 375 degrees

mix artichoke, Parmesan, mayo, and garlic pepper. Put chicken in greased dish. Spread mixture over evenly.

Bake uncovered 30 min


(I used half mayo/half sour cream and feel this is what makes it perfect! All mayo is too much. The last time I took the recommendation of heating up some bacon and then crumbling it into the mixture!)
0 Replies
 
 

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