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Eggs, they're whats for brekkies

 
 
Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 06:35 pm
So the lady Diane and meself are at the market today and we need eggs, she goes right for the "free-range large AA" at $3.79 dozen and I go for the "regular" large AA @ $1.19. ( we bought the "free-range") I'm thinking "what's the difference?". Now before you "organic nutjobs accost me, I, when still living on my farm, had nothing but "free-range" eggs. The thing is I don't know what value "free-range has when you are in the market and you have no idea what you are buying anyway.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 4,412 • Replies: 44
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Butrflynet
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 06:40 pm
Marketing. It's the extra printing costs for adding the extra words (free range) to the package.
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hingehead
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 06:42 pm
Howdy Dys

We always go free range - here in Oz you can't say free range unless they actually are, and people have been charged with lying.

Mrs Hinge likes them because the chickens aren't trapped in little cages pecking each others eyes out - good karma.

I like it because the yolks are yellower (like my grandparents chooks' eggs) the shells don't crumble when you crack them, and they taste better.

We both like the idea that the chickens weren't fed feed made mostly of soya (high in phyto-oestrogens) and ground up cow guts.
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Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 06:50 pm
Quote:
The U.S. Department of Agriculture requires that chickens raised for their meat have access to the outdoors in order to receive the free-range certification. Free-range chicken eggs, however, have no legal definition in the United States. Likewise, free-range egg producers have no common standard on what the term means. Many egg farmers sell their eggs as free range merely because their cages are 2 or 3 inches above average size, or there is a window in the shed.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_range
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Swimpy
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 06:50 pm
I don't know what the law is in NM, but "free-range" doesn't mean the same thing everywhere. I look for cage-free. I also try to be locally produced eggs. I think you can tast the difference.
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dyslexia
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 06:52 pm
Yeah I hear than Hinge but you know when I was still a farmer I did the free-range bit to save on feed costs because the chickens were let out into my garden to eat grass-hoppers and other bugs so they didn't need as much corn. Appetizing innit?
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roger
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 06:58 pm
Fresh eggs don't peel as well as them others, and wotinheller brekkies?
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djjd62
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 07:02 pm
you have to wonder about the first person who stood there and said, i'm gonna eat the first thing that comes out of the back end of that bird
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roger
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 07:06 pm
Hey, thanks for a beautiful image.
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ossobuco
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 07:20 pm
I admit to having wondered that. No, I'm lying. But I have wondered about who ate the first peas..
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hingehead
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 07:32 pm
Nah, the first oyster eater has my admiration...
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Mame
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 07:47 pm
When we first went to Greece about 10 years ago we couldn't believe the orange yolks and springy whites. We were there a month and got used to them (among other delicious foods) so when we returned home, we were totally disgusted with these pallid yellow yolks and loose whites. We switched then and there to free range. They're simply a better product.
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patiodog
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 07:51 pm
mmmm, taters and onions and peppers and mushrooms cooked under cover with a bit of oil and rice vinegar until the taters crumble and beaten eggses dumped on em and cooked under cover as well until it flattens and fluffs like a pancake and scooped out onto warm tortilla with sour cream and cholula or better yet homemade hot sauce mmmmmmm hungry
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CalamityJane
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 08:17 pm
That's mighty disgusting, patiodog. http://www.borge.diesal.de/board02/images/smiles/never.gif

I buy "organic" eggs, they just taste better. Dto. for chicken.
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hingehead
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 08:24 pm
I second organic chicken. I never much liked chicken (nay, I actively avoided it) until mrs Hinge bought some. Yum.
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edgarblythe
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 08:58 pm
Got to consider, the egg is a part of the bird that produces it. A healthy chicken that has not been fed poor quality diet and has received no unnatural injections has got to produce a better egg than one with its feet nailed to the floor, all pumped full of fluids, with someone like gus sexually harrassing them.
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dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 09:16 pm
Butrflynet wrote:
Quote:
The U.S. Department of Agriculture requires that chickens raised for their meat have access to the outdoors in order to receive the free-range certification. Free-range chicken eggs, however, have no legal definition in the United States. Likewise, free-range egg producers have no common standard on what the term means. Many egg farmers sell their eggs as free range merely because their cages are 2 or 3 inches above average size, or there is a window in the shed.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_range


Oh no! Say it ain't so! So the free range eggs can be just about any eggs whatsoever? Grrrrrrrrr!
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CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 09:52 pm
Well, there is a difference between "organic" and "free-range".
Free range animals are not necessarily organic, and organic is clearly
defined. Farmers of organic livestock can only feed 100 % natural
food, and need to be treated with homeopathic remedies if sick.

As with free-range animals, the farmers can supplement their food
with additives that are artificial, and livestock can be treated with
hormones.

So my advice would be: if you fork over more cashola for better
products, buy organic instead of free-range.
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patiodog
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 09:54 pm
Just be aware that in poultry as in cattle, organic says nothing about the conditions in which animals are raised, and needed medications to prevent and manage disease may be withheld in addition to growth-promoters.
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CalamityJane
 
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Reply Mon 30 Oct, 2006 10:02 pm
Organic products are regulated, patiodog.

http://www.ams.usda.gov/nop/NOP/standards.html
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