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Wildclickers #73: Brown - The progression of life

 
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Jul, 2006 04:32 pm
Thanks for the new thread, sumac.


... off to spread the news ...
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Jul, 2006 06:55 pm
Holá, amigos y amigas.

Nice new site, Sumac. I'll have to do some research, I guess. Haven't been south of the border in a dozen years.

Hasta luego.
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Jul, 2006 08:40 am
Thanks Stradee. I had not thought of the rain forests of Mexico as being in that area. Or indigenous primate research. Now I will have to do some research too.
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danon5
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Jul, 2006 01:21 pm
Most of my Mexico visits have been on the border and West Coast so I will come up with something for one of those areas. A funny thing in the Sinaloa state - the city of Los Mochis was named by the natives living in the area because after a rich USA lumber man came there during the late 1800's bringing with him a lot of wealthy families from America - the American people would shop and always ask, "How Much is this?" and "How much is that." (the natives started calling the gringos, "The Muches." In Spanish it is, "Los Mochis"
Funny how things get started sometimes.

I have a couple of true stories about the Sonora region also. That's Nogales and the tiny border town of Agua Prieta on the Southern border of Arizona.

all clicked
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Jul, 2006 05:10 pm
clicking

thanks to whoever arranged to have this thread featured Very Happy

~~~~~~~~~~

You and your 299 [/color]friends have supported 2,485,474.2 square feet!

Marine Wetlands habitat supported: 122,489.6 square feet.
You have supported: (0.0)
Your 299 friends have supported: (122,489.6)

American Prairie habitat supported: 54,261.8 square feet.
You have supported: (13,414.2)
Your 299 friends have supported: (40,847.6)

Rainforest habitat supported: 2,308,722.8 square feet.
You have supported: (172,172.4)
Your 299 friends have supported: (2,136,550.4)

~~~~~~~~~~

1 Aktbird57 .. 1529 57.057 acres

~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to WildClicker 299 !

# 299 has been a long-time friend of a number of WildClickers, though I don't know if # 299 knows it.
Very Happy
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 07:05 am
G'd day wildclickers ~ and welcome to our newest team clicker. Very Happy

Cabo San Lucas ~

Resting at the tip of the Baja Peninsula are the sparkling resorts of Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo, known as "the capes," or Los Cabos (los-KAH-bows) in Spanish.

http://www.cabosanlucasvillas.net/images/9.jpg

http://www.cabosanlucasvillas.net/images/18.jpg

http://www.cabosanlucasvillas.net/images/whalefin.jpg

The Sea Of Cortez

It was named in honor of Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés (or "Cortez") by Francisco de Ulloa in 1539. Ulloa originally believed that the gulf led to the mythical Strait of Anian, which connected the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean.

Melchior Díaz made extensive explorations in the area in 1540, including surveying the Colorado River which flows into the upper gulf.

"Sea of Cortez" redirects here. For the book by John Steinbeck, see Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research.
The Gulf of California (highlighted)The Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés; locally known in the Spanish language as Mar de Cortés or, much less frequently, Golfo de California) is a body of water that separates the Baja California Peninsula from the Mexican mainland. It is bordered by the states of Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sonora, and Sinaloa. The name "Gulf of California" predominates on most maps in English today. The name "Sea of Cortés" is the one preferred by most local residents. The Gulf opened up 5.3 million years ago which allowed the Colorado River to drain into the ocean.
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 07:34 am
Thanks Stradee, for the intro to Baja and the Sea of Cortez.

For everyone's information here, I know that a lot of the stuff I post here is not really of interest to even the three or four of us on this thread. I will find another place, perhaps create a thread called "Science News" under "Science". I am sure that the new version of a2k will have an appropriate place.

Meanwhile, please bear with me. These articles are just too interesting NOT to post someplace. So, here it will be for awhile yet.

One Mexico, I have some interest, and have done some research already in a couple of the states: Quintana Roo, Yucatan, and a northern state (side by side with Texas) that has taken a great deal of outsourcing of US manufacturing. A think it is Chi...someplace....I know that it begins with a "C".
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 07:38 am
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 07:38 am
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 07:43 am
http://images.barnesandnoble.com/images/1710000/1714061.gif


In 1940, Steinbeck's interest in marine biology and his friendship with Ed Ricketts led him to voyage in the Gulf of California, also known as the "Sea of Cortez," where they collected biological specimens. Their account of this trip was later published as The Log from the Sea of Cortez, and describes the daily experiences of the trip. Ed Ricketts had a tremendous impact on Steinbeck's writing. Not only did he help Steinbeck while he was in the process of writing, but he aided Steinbeck in his social adventures. Steinbeck would frequently go on trips with Ricketts to collect biological specimens and have a good time away from his writing. This down time gave Steinbeck an opportunity to think about things other than his writing, and gave him some very significant ideas. Ricketts' impact on Steinbeck was so great that Steinbeck decided to base his character "Doc" in Cannery Row, on Ricketts. Steinbeck's relationship with Ricketts would end when Steinbeck moved away from Salinas, California, to pursue a life away from his wife Carol.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a9/EFRicketts.jpg/180px-EFRicketts.jpg


Edward Flanders Robb Ricketts (May 14, 1897 - May 11, 1948) commonly known as Ed Ricketts, was an American marine biologist, ecologist, and philosopher.


Ed Ricketts, courtesy Pat Hathaway, www.caviews.comRicketts studied zoology at the University of Chicago and was influenced by his teacher, W. C. Allee, but Ricketts dropped out without a degree.

He was fictionalized by his friend John Steinbeck as the character, "Doc", in the novels, Cannery Row and Sweet Thursday, as "Doc Burton" in In Dubious Battle, "Casy" in The Grapes of Wrath and "Doctor Winter" in The Moon is Down. Steinbeck also co-wrote the narrative portion of Sea of Cortez with Ricketts, and later wrote a short remembrance of Ricketts in an introduction to the Viking edition published as The Log from the Sea of Cortez.

From 1927 to 1948, Rickett's Pacific Biological Laboratory at 800 Ocean View Avenue in Monterey was a salon of sorts, where writers, artists and other luminaries would gather. Bruce Ariss, Joseph Campbell, Henry Miller, John Steinbeck, Lincoln Steffens, and Francis Whitaker were just some of the visitors who flocked to Doc's lab.
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 08:04 am
Thank you so much for that, Stradee. Steinbeck's "Cannery Row",. and other seminal works on tidal pools, marshes, estuaries, etc., were a huge influence in my love for marine biology, oceanography, etc., one of my first majors in college. I should have stayed with it.

I have opened up a "Science News" forum under "General News", where it will not be seen. But if any of you are interested in what I have posted here in the past, go look there, as that is where I will have posted things to come.

In the meanwhile,

Here's for you, Danon.

http://images.livescience.com/images/060724_mudflats_04.jpg


It is so like your avatar.


Wild Mudflats, Alaskan Style


By Bruce G. Marcot, Ecology Picture of the Week:

As our noisy Beaver floatplane tilts into the morning sun, we find ourselves banking over vast mudflats here in coastal southeast Alaska. Below, the river channels filigree into tendrils that look like gargantuan dendrites of some impossible neuron.

But this is just one of a plexus of river drainages that create vast mudflats along the bays and inlets and islands of the Alexander Archipelago that spreads along southeast Alaska.

What good are mudflats? Particularly here in the far north, mudflats provide essential habitat for wildlife ... including millions of shorebirds for feeding, resting, and breeding. Mudflats also support vast numbers of invertebrates -- critical parts of the food web -- such as crustaceans, worms, water boatmen, mayflies, midges, moth flies, and many other species that feed birds and fish alike.

Mudflats are wonderful environments for conducting scientific studies and discovering new and complex relationships among organisms and their environment. For example, experiments have shown that shorebirds and crabs feeding in mudflats can significantly reduce the density of their invertebrate prey but in different ways and during different seasons. And the shorebirds had their greatest effect when feeding in the muddiest mudflat but not in the sandiest mudflat.

Mudflats are also more delicate ecosystems than they may first appear. They are quite vulnerable to pollution, particularly from oil spills. Ill effects of an oil spill can last for years or even decades as the oil seeps into the mud and sand
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danon5
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 09:19 am
Nice pic sumac. That's how I shot my avatar - on Puget Sound just North of Seattle - only, my photo was taken using false color film. That means the things that are 'red' in my photo are 'green' in real life. And, the other colors are 'false' also - thus the name of the film. The film is used mainly to detect disease in vegetation - because using the film a dead or diseased plant will be shown as 'black' or a varying shade of 'brown'. Healthy plants are bright red. The company I flew the photo plane for took photos of all the Ocean Spray Co. cranberry beds each year. That way Ocean Spray could monitor the health of their product. I also flew photo missions of every inch of shoreline including rivers and large streams and lakes in the entire state of Washington for the Army Corps of Engineers using the false color film - they used it to monitor human growth patterns around water areas. It took a long time to complete the job.

sumac, there are two Mexican states bordering Texas starting with a 'C' - Chihuahua and Coahuila
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 10:58 am
Right, Danon. I knew how you got your photos. Just thought that you would be interested in these - a different perspective.

And I thnk that the states that I started to research is that of: Chihuahua
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 10:59 am
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060724/us_nm/birdflu_hunters_dc_1

" Duck hunter exposed to type of bird flu

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent
Mon Jul 24, 6:27 PM ET



WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. duck hunter and two state wildlife employees had evidence of an uncommon type of bird flu virus in their blood, researchers reported on Monday in one of the first studies to show that hunters might be at risk.

The virus was H11N9, not known to be dangerous to humans and not related to the feared H5N1 virus circulating in wild and domestic birds and among some people, the researchers said.

But their study, published in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, shows that people who work with wildlife should take care.

"To our knowledge, this study is the first to show direct transmission of influenza A viruses from wild birds to humans," Dr. James Gill of the University of Iowa and colleagues wrote in their report.

The H5N1 avian influenza virus has not yet caused a human pandemic, but it has killed 132 people out of the 230 infected. It has infected birds in about 50 countries and is spreading faster than any other avian influenza ever has......."
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Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 11:03 am
Very Happy Click
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 12:08 pm
Digital Tradition Mirror
Blue-Eyed Girl

(This score available as ABC, SongWright, PostScript, PMW, or a MIDI file)
Pennywhistle notation and Dulcimer tab for this song is also available


Blue-Eyed Girl

cho: Fly around, my blue-eyed gal
Fly around my daisy;
Fly around my blue-eyed gal
Dam' near drive me crazy. *

The higher up on the cherry tree
The riper grows the cherry
More you hug and kiss the gals
Sooner you will marry.

cho:

Blue-eyed gal won't marry me
Brown-eyed gal won't have me;
If I can't have the gal I want
Single I will tarry.

cho:

Eighteen horses in my team
Leader he is blind;
Everywhere I drive that team
Pretty gal on my mind.

cho:

Possum up in a 'simmon tree
Raccoon on the ground;
Possum up in a 'simmon tree
Shakin' 'simmons down.

*Methodists sang "Almost drives me crazy."
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 05:34 pm
You and your 299 friends have supported 2,486,902.5 square feet!

Marine Wetlands habitat supported: 122,630.1 square feet.
You have supported: (0.0)
Your 299 friends have supported: (122,630.1)

American Prairie habitat supported: 54,261.8 square feet.
You have supported: (13,414.2)
Your 299 friends have supported: (40,847.6)

Rainforest habitat supported: 2,310,010.5 square feet.
You have supported: (172,219.3)
Your 299 friends have supported: (2,137,791.3)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

1 Aktbird57 .. 1530 57.088 acres
0 Replies
 
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jul, 2006 06:58 pm
sumac, that's a great old song. I have tons of 78 rpm records and a couple Victrolas to play them on...... They are fun. Here is one of my absolute favorites.......


HUGGIN and A CHALKIN'

I gotta gal that's mighty sweet, With blue eyes and
tiny feet. Her name is Rosabelle Magee, and she tips
the scale at three o three, Oh!
Gee- but ain't it grand to have a girl so big and fat
that when you hug'er
You don't know where you're at you
Have to take a piece of chalk in your hand and
hug a way and chalk a mark to see where you began,

One day when I was a huggin and a chalkin and a chalkin
and a huggin a way. When I met another fella with
some chalk in his hand, Com-in' around the other way 'round
the mountain. Comin' around the other way.

Nobody ever said I'm weak. My bones don't ache and my joints
creak. But I I grow absolutely limp, Ev-'ry time I kiss my
baby blimp, Oh!
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Jul, 2006 06:44 am
Glad you have the Victrolas. That is the important thing. I have a box of my mother's 78's from the 30's and 40's. Don't know what to do with them,
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danon5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Jul, 2006 09:06 am
all clicked........

Hoping for an 'ul' sighting........grin

sumac, any really unusual titles on your 78's??
I always am looking for rail road records from those times..... Especially one that I had until it broke - "Texas and Pacific Blues" and on the flip "Sunshine Special"
0 Replies
 
 

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