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Self Portraits

 
 
msolga
 
Reply Sat 9 Nov, 2002 05:13 am
Is there a particular self portrait that communicates something special to you?
Maybe you find it particularly moving, or humorous, or intriguing ..?
Maybe your insight into the artist's life & artistic motivations make a particular work very special for you?

I love both Van Gogh's & Rembrandt's many self portraits for the same reason: They tell so much about each artist so honestly, humbly & beautifully. We can see how each of them developed as a person, the sadness, the pain, the changes ...

I invite you to share your favourite self portrait/s.
What is it that so appeals to you?
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Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Nov, 2002 05:48 am
Van Gogh is probably the most expressive of self-portraiters that I know. I'll have to sleep on this one. I'm sure there are many others.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Nov, 2002 10:30 am
Rembrandt and one of the most intense, Ensor.
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Nov, 2002 02:52 pm
self portraits
LightWizard

I am so moved by Rembrandt's late self portraits. In old age he comes across so sincerely, so human. All life's disappointments show in his face. Nothing was hidden.
I wish I could master the link-thing & post a few of my favourites here. But unfortunately I haven't the time (nor the concentration!) to learn to do this right now. (I'm in the throes of packing to move house!)
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Nov, 2002 04:25 pm
Frieda Kalo hardly painted anything else. And some of her work is moving indeed.
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Anonymous
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2003 03:28 pm
SELF-PORTRAITS


My immediate response to the question of a powerful self portrait was also Van Gogh.

However, the self portrait that impacted me the most, I must say was done by Michealangelo. It is is the lesser known, if known at all Pieta {sculpture} that he did at the end of his life. It was never finished.

In this particular Pieta, Michaelangelo portrayed himself, an old man, as Joseph of aremethea assisting with the body of Jesus. But, to me, my eye was drawn to the self-portrait of Michalelangelo. Looking at it, it seemed to me to convey the feelings of a lifetime, LIVED and Endured. A bit, beaten, perhaps, but nevertheless, Michaelangelo was still involved and working at what his life was. Scuplture.

When I viewed this Pieta, it appeared to me to be The Self-Portrait of Michaelangelo. The other *players* were co-incidental. Not, that I believe that was his intention. simply, 'Joseph of Aremethea/Michaelangelo, was such a powerful figure.

When I saw this sculpture, it was in a some what obscure place . of not much note in a church whose name I do not recall. I saw this sculpture before the Pieta for which Michaelangelo was renowned. I had so much admired the delicate beauty of this Pieta, from images seen.

After seing the rough-hewn, Pieta, where Michaelangelo used himself as a model, I must say, that I was let down by the famous one. It was lovely.
But the emotion seemed missing compared to the Pieta that Michaelangelo sculpted, unfinished, at the end of his life.

It has been quite awhile since I saw the latter-life Pieta, and it still haunts/challenges my memory.

Guadalupe107
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 10:17 pm
One of the most mawkish self-portraits that comes to mind is Norman Rockwell's image of himself, pipe in mouth, sitting at his easel, back to the viewer, and the image you see is what's on the canvas.
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2003 05:23 pm
Portraits are a topic I can really sink my teeth into but strangely, self portraits are a topic I've not given much though to.

Michalangelo's self portrait as the skinned alive St. Bartholemew on the alter wall of the Sistiene Chapel is certainly one of the most psychologically compelling to me.
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JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2003 05:37 pm
Rapheal always painted himself into his portraits I have been told.

Before restoration: http://images.google.com/images?q=tbn:ysmrRMrjCWEC:www.anth.ucsb.edu/projects/esm/IAM/Raphael.jpg


After restoration was complete: http://images.google.com/images?q=tbn:1gE3xjoq5hAC:www.epilepsiemuseum.de/raum5/transfig.jpg

Hmmm, which guy do you thing is Raphael?
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satt fs
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Feb, 2003 04:21 am
Velazquez.
http://www.ucm.es/info/mupai/dibujos/velazquez.jpg
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mistral
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Feb, 2003 10:36 am
Rembrandt
I just had the opportunity to see a number of Rembrandt's self portraits in original. Also his portraits of old men. It seems he was fascinated by age. Was he controlling his personal growing old? - Self portraits by old masters in a group of persons use mostly to look direct into the public.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Feb, 2003 12:07 am
Oh, I love that Velasquez.......

Joanne, I can't see the fellows closely enough to pick out Raffaelo, as if I could, but it would be fun to try.

Rembrant must have been fascinated with the increments of changes in a face.
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satt fs
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Feb, 2003 01:13 am
Michelangelo's self-portrait in "The Last Judgment" of Sistine Chapel.
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JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Feb, 2003 03:07 am
http://www.nmwa.org/images/collection/images/8/5/9/mw4958.jpg

Alice Bailly (Swiss, 1872-1938)
Self-Portrait
1917
Oil on canvas, 32 x 23 1/2 in.
Gift of Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay

National Mueseum of Women In The Arts - Washington, D.C.
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JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Feb, 2003 04:13 pm
self portrait
Joanne, I love the Alice Bailey self portrait. I love it for its aesthetic value,and the fact that it is clearly not a substitute for a photograph. I've done two self portraits in a mirror, but alas I'm too uptight to make a really good one. I think an artistic portrait should be a high-grade sort of caricature of the individual, something that captures some of the person's "essence". I am too vain to do that for myself. Somebody, nevertheless, asked me how much I wanted for it. I was so flattered (a feeling I wished to conceal) that I gave it to her as if it were no big deal. But of course it was.
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colorific
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Mar, 2003 09:27 pm
I simply cannot stand the one by Norman Rockwell; the Howdy-doody of 20th century painting and such a Vermeer weeny- wanna-be.
I like Picasso's; and I see something new each time I view the Rembrandts at the Met...so I vouch for their substance.
I love how Picasso portrayed Jaqueline in those pieces of (1940"s?)
Durer was a true master; but probably vain as hell
Van Gogh's are authentic, as well as Bonnard.
Freud did some unique pencil ones; and Bob Dylan's is a piece of crap.
Holbein used the same trick as Velasquez; pretty slick.
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Rae
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Mar, 2003 10:16 pm
This is a gorgeous painting, satt_focusable.
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JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Mar, 2003 11:12 pm
portraits
Has someone yet mentioned Picasso's portrait of Gertrude Stein? I see it as one of the best of all time.
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JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Mar, 2003 11:22 pm
I agree he, Picasso caught the absolute essence of her being Perfection and imperfection all in one, I like your self portraits JLN much better than a photo.
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Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Mar, 2003 12:39 pm
Self Portraiture is fun indeed. As a photographer I have had to use myself occastionally as the personl on location when I needed someone in the picture.It didn't stop there either. Trying alot of experimental techniques I used myself both as model and selfportraitis. I've done many over the years. Always pushing the boundry to something better or more provocative.Some of them are pretty wacked out. When photopoint.com was in exixtence they offered movie making programming and contemporary music.I made my modern day Internet self portrait there using 20 years of self portraits. In the end it came out beyond my wishes a new level of self portraiture. I sent my 3 minute movie to a Montreal Hollywood Casting agent, who had cast me occasionally and she found it multilayered and mesmerizing. Unfortunately I never coulkd get a copy before they went under.
But as far a self portraiture is concerned that medium and delivery offer something untouchable by any other singular image, Or just a singular image too. I think the B&W portrait of Dali Painting with water going through the air and the flying cats by Halsman is untouchable as a brilliant photographic visionary image.
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