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Frankenfood: The implications for today and the future

 
 
marycat
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 May, 2003 11:23 pm
*bookmarking to read further later but want to remind myself to mention the thing I read once about splicing peanut genes into tomato genes that absolutely terrified my peanut-allergic but tomato-loving self*
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littlek
 
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Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 09:07 pm
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sozobe
 
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Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 09:14 pm
Huh. Interesting.
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littlek
 
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Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 09:15 pm
very interesting considering it's rice, a not so complex carbohydrate.
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cavfancier
 
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Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 11:10 pm
Walter, I would still take raw milk cheese over pasteurized any day, despite the improvements Wink
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 12:15 am
Glad to hear that, cav! :wink:
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littlek
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 07:41 am
Raw goat's milk cheese! My favorite. Even I can't justify spending that much more on cheese though.
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cavfancier
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 07:49 am
I get a 5 year old raw milk cheddar from Quebec in small amounts that is actually somewhat reasonably priced.
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littlek
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 07:58 am
Well, being on this side of the border, I can't. Actually, I can't find well-priced vermont raw cheese here. I wonder if it's specially taxed.
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 10:24 am
cav

Cheddar, from Chesterquebecshire, I see Laughing
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Thomas
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 01:52 pm
gozmo wrote:
Thomas we agree. The end producer is responsible and if not informed about inputs cannot vouch for his own product. Were you in this business would you take that risk?

It would depend on the specific product I sell. To take two extreme cases, I wouldn't produce mayonaise without making sure my eggs are free of salmonellas. On the other hand, I'd have no trouble at all producing T-shirts without knowing if my cotton is from a gene-manipulated crop or not. Your earlier implication that the producer must always know whether his inputs are GM is unsupported. I suspect you know this, and that this is the reason you detect non-existent chagrin in my post when I ask you for evidence.
gozmo wrote:
Let me suggest that fallibility does not mean you are always wrong. Government officials are more likely to be disinterested than company officials. No one exists to lie, but it is done even by company executives.

a) I'm not suggesting politicians are always wrong. I'm just unwilling to take your word that they are less likely to be wrong than the businesses whose decisions they're interfering with. b) Government officials are more likely to be disinterested than company officials, but they are also more likely to be incompetent. The reason is simple: If you're disinterested, your incentive to get informed will be low. c) I agree company executives lie, but again, I won't accept without evidence your implication that politicians and bureaucrats lie less. People are people, and people lie -- no matter if they work for a business or for government.

gozmo wrote:
It is chagrin.

No, just disagreement and a pig-headed insistence on evidence.

-- Thomas
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Thomas
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 02:10 pm
Here's an interesting article on our subject. It's in the Economist, so gozmo will no doubt dismiss it. Nevertheless I highly recommend it. I especially found this piece about the cross-pollination problem interesting:

Since no plausible evidence has yet emerged of risks to human health from eating GM food, the environmentalists' main remaining objection is that GM plants may cross-pollinate others, spreading their alien genes to other species with unpredictable environmental effects. Some evidence has emerged suggesting this could happen, though a breakthrough announced this month by a group of Canadian scientists may overcome the problem: they have developed a sort of agricultural contraceptive, in which GM plants that pollinate their non-GM relatives produce only sterile offspring. The initial research was carried out on GM tobacco plants but, if it proves applicable to other species, it may make GM crops' worldwide spread unstoppable.

-- Thomas
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cavfancier
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 02:12 pm
Walter, it may be far from it's native home, but Canada makes some of the best Cheddar in the world...you should try it sometime Very Happy
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 02:19 pm
Well, certainly better than the Irish I get at my local cheese shop.
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Thomas
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 02:21 pm
Cavfancier: We may never agree on gene manipulation, but it's nice to see we're all part of the universal raw milk cheese brotherhood Smile
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cavfancier
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 02:25 pm
Oooh yeah, Thomas....Smile
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cavfancier
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 02:26 pm
Which reminds me....the dairy industry that prevents us from getting all the raw milk cheese we desire....perhaps a subject for another thread?
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Thomas
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 02:29 pm
Not a bad idea -- but wouldn't it be boring if we all agreed with each other?
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cavfancier
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 02:36 pm
Hmm...good point....
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 02:44 pm
Actually I do get my raw milk cheese: 'my' cheese shop (which is in a normal supermarket) has about 15 different kinds and additionally five organic ones. (Just cow milk)
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