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LET'S BURN A CHICKEN ! ! !

 
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Feb, 2006 09:14 pm
Those are dried beans, not fresh, and they're in Illinois, not Ontario . . .
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Feb, 2006 09:52 pm
Yeh, but you plant them...
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Feb, 2006 09:55 pm
Unless I'm totally confused, which as you know is possible.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 11:35 am
It's mmm not terribly legal to bring seeds from the U.S. to Canada. You have to buy a "phyto" - not worth it.
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Chai
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 12:07 pm
Cowboy Caviar....



1 1/2 teaspoons hot pepper sauce
2 teaspoons vegetable OR olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 firm, ripe avocado
1 (15-ounce) can black-eyed peas, drained
1 (11-ounce) can corn kernels, drained
2/3 cup sliced green onion
2/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/2 pound Roma (plum) tomatoes, coarsely chopped
Salt to taste
Tortilla chips for accompaniment
In a large bowl, mix vinegar, hot sauce, oil, garlic and pepper. Peel, pit and cut avocado into 1/2-inch cubes. Add to vinegar mixture and toss lightly.
Drain and rinse peas and corn. Add peas, corn, onion, cilantro and tomatoes. Mix gently to coat. Add salt to taste. Refrigerate, well sealed.
Serve as an appetizer with tortilla chips or add 2 cups shredded cabbage to make a salad.
Yield: 12 appetizer portions or 6 salad servings.

There's variations of these too....good salsa, high fiber.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 04:48 pm
Tonight, i'm cooking up some peameal bacon to put in the black-eyed peas. Peameal bacon, also known as back bacon (a la Bob and Doug MacKenzie) or cured pork backs, is an excellent ham-like cut of pork which is rolled in peameal or cornmeal (i prefer the peameal, but the cornmeal variety which i'm using is quite good) and then cured by an arcane means of which i know nothing. What is known in the United States as "Canadian bacon" does not, to my knowledge, exist in Canada.

It orta be good . . .
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flushd
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 04:53 pm
mmmm...
Y'know what else is good? Side-bacon chunks in pea soup. Soul-food, it is!
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 04:54 pm
At the St. Lawrence Market in downtown t.o., they got these peameal bacon sammiches which are to die for . . . and only $3.85 (last time i was there) for a sammich without about a half pound of back bacon on it . . .
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:00 pm
Setanta wrote:
Tonight, i'm cooking up some peameal bacon to put in the black-eyed peas. Peameal bacon, also known as back bacon (a la Bob and Doug MacKenzie) or cured pork backs, is an excellent ham-like cut of pork which is rolled in peameal or cornmeal (i prefer the peameal, but the cornmeal variety which i'm using is quite good) and then cured by an arcane means of which i know nothing. What is known in the United States as "Canadian bacon" does not, to my knowledge, exist in Canada.

It orta be good . . .


Mmmmm....back bacon.

You mean rashers of this, Set?

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b358/lordellpus/bb.jpg

That's all we eat over here, when it comes to bacon.

Mmmmm......back bacon.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:05 pm
I ate rasher like that in Ireland, but these have been "cured," and i suspect that means they have been picked in brine. As you look at that pork back, imagine all but the large, round and lean portion cut away, and that's what you get here for back bacon. It is also cut quite a bit thicker than bacon rashers, as well as being kept in water (once again, i suspect brine).

The variations of pork are manifold and divine, and i am grateful to think that we don't have to share with the Jews, the Muslims or the Hindus.
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:10 pm
chicken
here is the story - nicely illustrated - of...CANADIAN PEAMEAL BACON...

lord e , it is the centre cut of the 'rashers' you showed; there is very little fat on the bacon. one needs to put a little butter in the pan for a fry-up.
it's also only very lightly salted.
makes a good fry-up ... set would know ! hbg
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:15 pm
Hamburger's link wrote:
Smokeless and tender, this product is sweet pickle-cured and rolled in a traditional golden cornmeal coating. It is known as peameal bacon, because in times past a mixture of ground yellow peas was used for coating to improve curing and shelf-life.


I suspected that it was brine cured--which accounts for a salty taste which is not as overpowering as the saltiness of traditional American sow-belly bacon.
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:27 pm
That's bacon in the pic, Set. I am quite an expert on bacon, as during my late teens, I used to work every evening, and then weekends, boning out about 50 sides of bacon a week. Each side of bacon weighed between 60 and 80lbs, and took about twenty minutes to bone out.

The whole side of a pig is left to soak in brine for a week or so, then some of these sides are sent straight to the supermarket to be boned out and cut up into joints or sliced into rashers.
This is called "green" bacon over here (unsmoked).

The other sides are put into a smoke kiln, where sawdust (the best comes from apple wood) smoke is drawn up past the meat for varying times, depending on the strength of smokey flavour required (average time is about five days, I think).

So, here we can buy smoked OR green back. Just to completely bore you silly, the shoulder part is used for ham, and is split into collar, hock and knuckle joints.
The back bacon comes from the middle part, where the rib bones join the spine. The streaky bacon comes from the other end of the rib bone, (belly end).

The back leg is also used for ham, and technically, is the only part of the pig that can be called gammon. This is split from the side of bacon, just behind the "oyster" bone, and is then split into three further pieces.
These three joints are called corner, slipper and gammon.

I would imagine, that in that short, physically exhausting but great fun time of my life, I boned out over 3000 of the buggers.
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:31 pm
If you are talking about removing everything from the rasher apart from the round meaty part, that is (or was...you just can't get it nowadays, unless you go to a traditional butcher/deli)...called "eye". "I'll have half a pound of smoked eye, please". It used to sound so strange at first, when customers used to ask for that.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:34 pm
Peameal bacon

mmmmmmmmmm

wonderful on the grill

mmmmmmmmmmmmmm
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Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:37 pm
I'm now officially hungry, thanks to this thread, and it is coming up to midnight.

Now....do I raid the fridge and put it straight onto my hips, or do I starve myself and keep my girlish figure?
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:38 pm
I recommend the strap-on approach.
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 05:39 pm
I am tempted to ask, but........
0 Replies
 
mans
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Feb, 2006 07:26 pm
i'd just eat anything, if i were you.
but that's because i eat everything actually.
0 Replies
 
 

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