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What do you glean from Nature

 
 
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2005 08:34 pm
I certainly glean all the wild berries I can get. Then one friend who grows melons commercially lets me take the flats at the end of the season.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 1,794 • Replies: 20
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2005 06:22 pm
mostly blueberries, though I do know quite a few edible local plants.
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Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2005 09:50 am
Yes and Merry Christmas littlek ! Blueberries are a no. one anti carcinogen too ! Maybe the best.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2005 09:56 am
They are great little things! Happy holidays to you, too!
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Chai
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2005 10:13 am
This is a good question - I'll have to think about this.
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husker
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2005 07:29 pm
http://www.paghat.com/images/huckleberries_sep.jpg

Quote:
There are
also about 40 species of Huckleberries, all native to North America, but
in some parts of the United States the name "huckleberry" is improperly
used for both blueberries and true huckleberries. Other people
mistakenly believe that blueberries always have blue or bluish fruit, and
that all huckleberries are black or purplish black. However, there are
dark-colored blueberries, and huckleberries that are distinctly blue, but
there is a sure way to tell one from the other: blueberries have a large
number of tiny soft seeds, whereas the huckleberries have 10 rather
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Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2005 09:02 pm
I haven't ever found a patch of those huckleberries...thanx.
Choke Cherries are also one of my favorites.
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2005 10:23 pm
Choke cherries. Yikes.

I've been known to nibble on the occasional lambsquarters, though. Might even pluck some for salads next spring.
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Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2005 09:33 am
Nice Roger....I want to try some

Luckily I collected acorns and pine cones to decorate my Christmas Table this year. Also to all A Very Merry Christmas of thoughtfull motivation towards a more harmonious world.
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Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2005 06:06 pm
What I don't necessarily grow myself, but find in nature:

Mushrooms, walnuts, hazelnuts, hickory nuts, wild grape, huckleberry, blueberry (plus we grow some), wild strawberry, chokeberry, currants, blackberry, raspberry, many wild greens (some are classified as weeds) plus various herbs (everything from thyme to sweet woodruff), sumac (not the poisonous kind obviously, the red berries make a lemonade drink) ramps, trout, bass, catfish, and wild turkey. You can eat cattails, but I don't care for them. When I lived near the ocean as a child it was a feast of fish, clams, mussels and crabs.
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shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2005 07:28 pm
today its honeysuckle flowers,
tomorrow it will be something else.
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StSimon
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2005 07:29 pm
Life itself! Just think if nature got mad at us!
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Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2005 12:48 pm
MC Green Witch !

That is truely a wonderfull bounty of nature. Delicious stuff too!
Today I gleaned a snow man from Nature.
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husker
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2005 12:50 pm
picture?
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Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 09:34 pm
Nice list Green Witch !
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flushd
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Dec, 2005 12:32 am
wow. I'm always on the lookout for new things to eat. Razz

Chokecherries, wild cranberries, wild strawberries, morels, pine needles for tea, greens, crab apples, baby ferns (fry em up in butter), dandelions for root-drink and the greens and for dandelion wine!.
Also, I've gleaned off of farmer's crops - sunflower heads, taters, corn, produce of all kinds and herbs, and fruit.....ssshhh!
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Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Dec, 2005 09:30 am
Algis.Kemezys wrote:
Nice list Green Witch !


Thanks Algis, I once taught a workshop on wild edibles, but people were so careless about what they would put in their mouth that I thought I might be sued. The one thing I found not worth the effort is acorn flour. It was a long tedious process and in the end, out from buckets & buckets of acorns, we got about a cup of flour. We kept it in a jar on a shelf and worshipped it for years, it took too long to make to just eat it.
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Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Dec, 2005 04:39 pm
Yeah I ate acorns in Maine while growing up. YUCKy YUCK YUCK.These days I am growing acorn on my little toe. Boy does it hurt when I knock it.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2006 10:18 pm
My great uncle visited after xmas and told a story about my Italian great grandmother - she used to wander around her neighborhood in CT and pick mushrooms which she would bring home for dinner. Her daughter and son-in-law wouldn't let their kids eat them. But, gr grandma did. And, she never got sick from them. My mother said they always smelled so good while she was cooking them up that she was always sad she couldn't eat them too.
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Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Jan, 2006 08:18 am
Thats the smallest room in the world....the Mushroom. My friends are picking them too all around southern quebec. Quie a variety too. Thanks for sharing littleK.
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