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Time For Another Top Ten List

 
 
Reply Tue 11 Oct, 2005 07:43 pm
It may be that time again to list our top ten movies of all time, including indies and foreign films. Mu current list is:

1. Vertigo
2. Woman in the Dunes
3. 2001: A Space Odyssey
4. L'Aventura
5. Singin' in the Rain
6. Blade Runner
7. The 400 Blows
8. Wild Strawberries
9. Seven Samarai
10. Lawrence of Arabia
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 4,128 • Replies: 67
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Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 04:11 am
1)Marty
2)Cocoon
3)The Best Years of Our Lives
4)Utopia
5)Camille
6)Slow Dancing In The Big City
7)Pocketful of Miracles
8)Carousel
9)It Happened One Night
10)How Green Was My Valley
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material girl
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 04:37 am
In undecidable order-
The Color Purple-oh how I cried
Silence of the Lambs-It places the lotion in the basket, it does this whenever its told
Copacabana-fab music, oh how i cried
Death becomes her-so watchable
Texas Chainsaw Massacre-for managing to be sh*t scary in daylight
Moulin Rouge-originality, great use of songs, lovely story
Jaws-a classic
Mousehunt-an unknown classic
City slickers-for still being funny after seeing it a load of times
Mr Hollands Opus-for taking me on an emotional roller coaster, fab music.

If I could have an 11th it would be The truth about cats and dogs.
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Mills75
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2005 08:21 pm
In no particular order as well:

Braveheart ("Every man dies, not every man really lives.")
The Lord of the Rings (Yeah, it was released as three separate films, but let's face it, it's really just one movie that happens to take about twelve hours to watch.)
The Godfather ("...Luca Brasi sleeps with the fishes.")
The Godfather II ("I know it was you Fredo. You broke my heart. You broke my heart!")
The Empire Strikes Back ("Try not! Do or do not. There is no 'try'.")
Dead Poets Society ("O Captain, my captain!")
Apocalypse Now ("You're an errand boy, sent by grocery clerks, to collect a bill.")
Spartacus ("I am Spartacus!")
Scent of a Woman ("When in doubt...f*ck.")
The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) ("You speak treason." "Fluently.")
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shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2005 08:25 pm
Lord of the rings
Serenity
Oldboy
Ju ON
Dark Crystal
Training Day
Mystic River ( maybe.. maybe not ...)


gotta think on the other ones
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LionTamerX
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2005 08:35 pm
Off the top of my head:

The Maltese Falcon
The Big Sleep (original)
Das Boot
Breaker Morant
Night of the Living Dead
Terminator
Lolita (original)
Dr. Strangelove
The Godfather
Gallipoli

Thinking for the next list...
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2005 08:40 pm
Far From the Madding Crowd--You knew I would say that.
"I love this woman, dead as she is, that I ever have, or ever could, love you."

The Good Earth. Lovely story.

Bram Stoker's Dracula. Beautiful cinematography and romantic.

Citizen Kane. Innovative and well acted.

How Green Was My Valley.

'Burbs. (Shut up.)

Forrest Gump. Hilarious. (The book was better.)

Seven Samauri

The Grapes of Wrath.

Dr. Zhivago
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Paaskynen
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 03:57 pm
Mine hasn't changed
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 06:06 pm
Lash wrote:
Far From the Madding Crowd--You knew I would say that.
"I love this woman, dead as she is, than I ever have, or ever could, love you."

The Good Earth. Lovely story.

Bram Stoker's Dracula. Beautiful cinematography and romantic.

Citizen Kane. Innovative and well acted.

How Green Was My Valley.

'Burbs. (Shut up.)

Forrest Gump. Hilarious. (The book was better.)

Seven Samauri

The Grapes of Wrath.

Dr. Zhivago
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 06:06 pm
Oops.

Mistake. Sorry.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 06:33 pm
Re: Time For Another Top Ten List
Lightwizard wrote:

1. Vertigo



I'm pleased to report that we'll be showing Vertigo on the big screen next Saturday night -- it's our version of a Halloween thriller.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 06:41 pm
It is a thriller but oh so much more! I actually saw it the first time when I was in high school on the big screen at the Montebello Theater. I remember being stunned at the ending but even when one kows the ending, each scene is to be savoured for its director's wonderfully bravura direction. The actors give dynamite performances and the cinematography and Bernard Hermann score are terrific.
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Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 06:55 pm
1. Road warrior (Video traing for the Post Bush world)
2. Cinema paradiso
3. Grapes of wrath
4. Howard the Duck
5. Boffalo 66
6.Cool hand luke
7.Ishtar
8. some french movie were two people are talking in a cafe for two hours.
9. I forget what 9 was
10. One flew over the coco's nest

For all the ladies out there. I'm a cross between Cool hand luke and the Road Warrior. Cool
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 07:14 pm
We're hoping for a happy audience, LW. I'll be sure and mention that they should listen appreciatively to the score. They're having a Hitchcock Extravaganza in the next town over... we're hanging on their coat-tails.

Amigo -- As it happens, we're showing One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in January. It is a little long (133 minutes) and I'm worried about that, but it sure has a great rep. I haven't seen it since it was on the big screen.
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Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 07:15 pm
Frist, I just want Lash to know since she has strongly recommended Madding Crowd ('67) in a few threads I have been trying to buy the VHS on Ebay and 1/2.com for the last few weeks. It keeps going higher than I am willing to pay.

In no particular order:

The Red Shoes
A Room With A View
Gone With The Wind
The Lord of The Rings
Charade
The Mouse That Roared
The Producers
Lili
Ben Hur
The African Queen
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 07:21 pm
In no particular order:

Marat/Sade
Grapes of Wrath
Good Bad Ugly
Searchers
My Fair Lady
Titanic
Gone With the Wind
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
Midnight Cowboy
Lord of the Flies

Ten is too short a list. Twenty would be better.
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Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 07:25 pm
Piffka wrote:
We're hoping for a happy audience, LW. I'll be sure and mention that they should listen appreciatively to the score. They're having a Hitchcock Extravaganza in the next town over... we're hanging on their coat-tails.

Amigo -- As it happens, we're showing One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in January. It is a little long (133 minutes) and I'm worried about that, but it sure has a great rep. I haven't seen it since it was on the big screen.
It's a dynamic movie. This makes seem not so long. I didn't realize it was that long. You learned me somethin'
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 08:42 pm
The BFI (British Film Institute) magazine Sight and Sound's last poll from 2002 or the world film critics generated this list:

Title Votes Rank
Citizen Kane (Welles) 46 1
Vertigo (Hitchcock) 41 2
La Régle du jeu (Renoir) 30 3
The Godfather and The Godfather Part II (Coppola) 23 4
Tokyo Story (Ozu) 22 5
2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick) 21 6
Battleship Potemkin (Eisenstein) 19 7
Sunrise (Murnau) 19 7
8 1/2 (Fellini) 18 9
Singin' in the Rain (Kelly, Donen) 17 10
Seven Samurai (Kurosawa) 15 11
The Searchers (Ford) 15 11
Rashomon (Kurosawa) 14 13
The Passion of Joan of Arc (Dreyer) 12 14
A bout de souffle (Godard) 11 15
L'Atalante (Vigo) 11 15
The General (Keaton) 11 15
Touch of Evil (Welles) 11 15
Au hasard Balthazar (Bresson) 10 19
Jules et Jim (Truffaut) 10 19
L'avventura (Antonioni) 10 19
Le Mépris (Godard) 9 22
Pather Panchali (Ray) 9 22
La dolce vita (Fellini) 8 24
M (Lang) 8 24
The Story of the Late Chrysanthemums (Mizoguchi) 8 24
Barry Lyndon (Kubrick) 7 27
Les Enfants du paradis (Carné) 7 27
Ivan the Terrible (Eisenstein) 7 27
Man with a Movie Camera (Vertov) 7 27
Metropolis (Lang) 7 27
Some Like It Hot (Wilder) 7 27
Ugetsu Monogatari (Mizoguchi) 7 27
Wild Strawberries (Bergman) 7 27
Andrei Roublev (Tarkovsky) 6 35
The 400 Blows (Truffaut) 6 35
Fanny and Alexander (Bergman) 6 35
La Grande Illusion (Renoir) 6 35
The Magnificent Ambersons (Welles) 6 35
Modern Times (Chaplin) 6 35
Psycho (Hitchcock) 6 35
The Seventh Seal (Bergman) 6 35
Taxi Driver (Scorsese) 6 35
The Third Man (Reed) 6 35
Bicycle Thieves (De Sica) 5 45
Blade Runner (Scott) 5 45
City Lights (Chaplin) 5 45
Greed (von Stroheim) 5 45
Intolerance (Griffith) 5 45
Lawrence of Arabia (Lean) 5 45
Letter from an Unknown Woman (Ophuls) 5 45
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (Ford) 5 45
Mirror (Tarkovsky) 5 45
Ordet (Dreyer) 5 45
Pierrot le fou (Godard) 5 45
Rio Bravo (Hawks) 5 45
Sansho Dayu (Mizoguchi) 5 45
Shoah (Lanzmann) 5 45
The Travelling Players (Angelopoulos) 5 45
Two or Three Things I Know about Her (Godard) 5 45
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 08:50 pm
And their final top ten with capsule descriptions. "Citizen Kane" dropped out of my top ten only because I would not particularly make it a point to watch it again at this point. I've watched the other films many times and within the last few years.

Critics' Top Ten Poll

1. Citizen Kane (Welles)
Dazzlingly inventive, technically breathtaking, Citizen Kane reinvented the way stories could be told in the cinema, and set a standard generations of film-makers have since aspired to. An absorbing account of a newspaper tycoon's rise to power, Orson Welles' debut film feels as fresh as tomorrow's headlines. And he was only 26 when he made it. Who voted for Citizen Kane?

2. Vertigo (Hitchcock)
A gripping detective story or a delirious investigation into desire, grief and jealousy? Hitchcock had a genius for transforming genre pieces into vehicles for his own dark obsessions, and this 1958 masterpiece shows the director at his mesmerising best. And for James Stewart fans, it also boasts the star's most compelling performance. Who voted for Vertigo?

3. La Règle du jeu (Renoir)
Tragedy and comedy effortlessly combine in Renoir's country house ensemble drama. A group of aristocrats gather for some rural relaxation, a shooting party is arranged, downstairs the servants bicker about a new employee, while all the time husbands, wives, mistresses and lovers sweetly deceive one another and swap declarations of love like name cards at a dinner party. Who voted for La Règle du jeu?

4. The Godfather and The Godfather part II (Coppola)
Few films have portrayed the US immigrant experience quite so vividly as Coppola's Godfather films, or exposed the contradictions of the American Dream quite so ruthlessly. And what a cast, formidable talent firing all cylinders: Brando, De Niro, Pacino, Keaton, Duvall, Caan. Now that's an offer you can't refuse. Who voted for The Godfather?

5. Tokyo Story (Ozu)
A poignant story of family relations and loss, Ozu's subtle mood piece portrays the trip an elderly couple make to Tokyo to visit their grown-up children. The shooting style is elegantly minimal and formally reticent, and the film's devastating emotional impact is drawn as much from what is unsaid and unshown as from what is revealed. Who voted for Tokyo Story?

6. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick)
One of the most ambitious Hollywood movies ever made, 2001 crams into its two-hour plus running time a story that spans the prehistoric age to the beginning of the third millennium, and features some of the most hypnotically beautiful special effects work ever committed to film. After seeing this, you can never listen to Strauss' Blue Danube without thinking space crafts waltzing against starry backdrops. Who voted for 2001: A Space Odyssey?

7. Battleship Potemkin (Eisenstein)
Eisenstein's recreation of a mutiny by sailors of the battleship Potemkin in 1905 works as daring formal experiment - which pushed the expressive potential of film editing to its limit - and rousing propaganda for the masses. The Odessa Steps sequence remains one of the most memorable set-pieces in cinema. Who voted for Battleship Potemkin?

7. Sunrise (Murnau)
Having left his native Germany for the US, F.W. Murnau had all the resources of a major Hollywood studio at his disposal for this, his American debut. What he produced was a visually stunning film romance that ranks as one of the last hurrahs of the silent period. Who voted for Sunrise?

9. 8 1/2 (Fellini)
Wonderfully freefloating, gleefully confusing reality and fantasy, 8 1/2 provides a ringside seat into the ever active imaginative life of its director protagonist Guido, played by Fellini's on-screen alter-ego Marcello Mastroianni. The definitive film about film-making - as much about the agonies of the creative process as the ecstasies - it's no wonder the movie is so popular with directors. Who voted for 8 1/2?

Singin' In the Rain (Kelly, Donen)
Impossible to watch without a smile on your face, this affectionate tribute to the glory days of Hollywood in the 1920s is pleasure distilled into 102 minutes. With Gene Kelly dance sequences that take your breath away and a great score by Brown and Freed, this is the film musical at its best. Who voted for Singin' in the Rain?
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2005 08:53 pm
Here's the link to Sight and Sound so you can use the "Who voted for" link.

http://www.bfi.org.uk/sightandsound/topten/poll/critics.html
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