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The Greatest Painting in Britain - vote

 
 
Clary
 
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2005 01:20 am
The BBC is running a vote for the best painting in Britain - not necessarily by a British artist - and is asking for votes. Their website is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/today/vote/greatestpainting/index_vote_secure.shtml
Today the Poet Laureate was explaining why he loves The Hay Wain by Constable - a very English painting.
http://www.robert-lavigne.com/Fichiers/PAN-360-v4/The_Hay_Wain.jpg


Take an hour to tour the British galleries and see what YOU would choose! I'm still looking, though my feeling is that it should be a native painter - Turner is probably my favourite.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 5,679 • Replies: 27
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Endymion
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2005 08:32 pm
My personal choice would be

'Cowles Fish and Chip Shop, Cleator Moor', 1948. by L.S.Lowry

But of course, it's not on the list of finalists.
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material girl
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2005 01:54 am
The painting I think Id enjoy the most from those listed is Turners 'The Fighting Temeraire'.Its so atmospheric and beautiful.
Hmmm, id seriously have to think about other paintings Ive seen.
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Clary
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 01:07 am
I agree, Material Girl. He was ahead of his time, that Turner.

I looked in vain for your choice Endymion, but it wasn't on the net. Here's another Lowry though, The Fever Van.http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/walker/collections/20c/graphics/large/lowry.jpg
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Endymion
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 03:30 am
Thanks. I adore Lowry's understanding of the working class Brit. You can really smell the coal dust!
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Clary
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 08:23 am
By the way Endy, here is a post of mine you may not have seen Smile
Endymion predates Dan Simmons by millennia, Endy!
In Greek mythology, he was the most handsome of men, the god of eternal youth and fertility. Some versions describe him as king, others as a shepherd. The moon goddess Selene was so smitten with Endymion's beauty that she put him into a perpetual sleep so that she could kiss him whenever she wished.

In his poem ENDYMION, John Keats starts with the famous sentence:

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever: 
Its loveliness increases; it will never 
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep 
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep 
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 08:34 am
Clary wrote:
I looked in vain for your choice Endymion, but it wasn't on the net.


So we'll have to do until what this picture says ...
http://imagecache2.allposters.com/images/pic/ROS/SPL413~Warten-dass-die-Geschaefte-oeffnenIWaiting-For-The-Shops-To-Open.jpg
... waiting until the shops open.

Or, until I post it :wink:

http://www.visitcumbria.com/books/lowry-cm1.jpg
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 09:09 am
I haven't been to Britain, have a starting bias for Turner, but that's my own avidity in particular. I'll look a the link a while - I expect to have trouble picking one 'greatest' as there are so may roads to greatness.
Back in a bit.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 09:24 am
All right, now that I've looked at the ten, I won't pick that particular Turner.
It is hard to make a choice as the paintings represent achievements of different times in the history of painting.

My first and not definite selection is Rake's Progress, for my own subjective reasons of this particular morning in 2005, reasons I'd discuss later.

I'll wander off now to look at the explanations about nominations (including more than the ten chosen) on the side of the link-page.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 10:01 am
Well, that was short circuited since I can't unload all the explanations.
But I could look at six other photos, among them some that throw my choice of Rake's Progress, the Orgy into question:

Of those six -
I have long had Uccello's Battle of San Romano in the Uffizi as one of my favorite paintings, having to do with perspective and apparent motion and interconnection of elements and yes, the horses, and colors. This version of The Battle of San Romano in Britain has much of the same that I like, though different colors, as far as I can tell. Anyway, the why's in my liking the Uccello's also somewhat apply to my liking of Hogarth's Rake's Progress, the Orgy. I like the interconnectedness of the elements (people), the apparent motion, the depth to the painting scene, the colors.

Then there's Caravaggio, The Supper at Emmaus has it all, truly great painting. Geez, look at that guy's arms going in and out of the picture plane..

I was touched by Execution of Lady Jane Grey by the French academic painter Paul delaroche - quite modern in its way...

I liked that Battle of Britain painting too.




I'll come back to selecting, for the BBC poll, Hogarth's Rake's Progress.
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Clary
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 10:22 am
Yes, Os, I would agree Not particularly that Turner. I love some of his others:
http://www.art-and-artist.co.uk/j_m_w_turner/artist/gifetc/turner-yacht.jpg

stunning, I think.

Incidentally he was very free with the landscapes. My home town isn't a bit like this, even allowing for changes since 1824, he's moved the castle and changed the height of the land to make it more impressive!
http://www.j-m-w-turner.co.uk/artist/gifetc/turner-totnes.jpg\
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 10:51 am
As an aside, here's a thread by Vivien on favorite paintings that might be a pleasure for some who missed participating -

http://www.able2know.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=9809
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2005 10:41 am
mmm I'll have to go for the Turner simply because I love his work - his sketch books in particular.

The last of England: there are 2 versions of this and in one there's a man shaking his fist at England as they unwillingly leave. I'm not keen on this era of painting even though I can appreciate its skill, it's a bit too heavy handedly sentimental for me on the whole.

It's always difficult when they limit you like this as they don't choose the images to represent the artist that you would.

The Bar at the Folies Bergeres is great and the Caravaggio is amazing.
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Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2005 11:22 am
First, I really do not like these ranking contest. Generally, IMHO the best painting around is the one I'm looking at at the moment. For me "good paintings" are the one's that for some reason stick in my mind and that criteria is highly idiosyncratic. Secondly On one level I like all the paintings but on another level I don't really like any of the the paintings on the short list. Many are passive or overly emotional (sappy), Hogarth excepted. IMHO he is the best of the lot but I think that composition worked better as an engraving. But to disabuse anyone of the notion that there is any great intellect at work here, my idea of a great painting is West's "The Death of Wolf" which isn't a painting at all but rather a masterful piece of propaganda.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2005 09:53 am
From the Guardian:

Quote:
The National Gallery, along with the Today programme, is searching for the best painting hanging in Britain. But not all artworks are so admired. We asked 10 experts to select the pictures they loathe...


Full report and list of paintings
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2005 10:47 am
That's quite funny, Walter..
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2005 11:30 am
ossobuco wrote:
That's quite funny, Walter..


I suppose, they meant it serious. :wink:
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JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2005 04:59 pm
Of the ten selected, I choose the Turner too. I would have liked to see a Kitaj and a Francis Bacon.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2005 07:42 pm
C'mon, you guys, you think that particular Turner (I say as a Turner fan) is better than all the rest as paintings at their time?
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2005 07:49 pm
Actually to judge this kind of thing accurately you'd have to know a lot more than I do, and many other people... as to where that Piero fell in his life's work. Piero della Francesca cut quite a swath in art history - to me and people who do that for a living. How is his work somehow less than a ... eh.. Turner.
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