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Were the Atlanta spa killings that transpired recently politically-motivated?

 
 
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2021 10:58 pm
Hi. Someone I know told me that a White male was going around committing "hate crimes" against Asian women a few weeks ago. The man killed six Asian women at a spa in Atlanta.

Was this politically-motivated? Why did this guy kill six Asian women? If he blamed these women for the Covid-19 pandemic and crisis that is sick; they had nothing to do with that. Were the women in question Chinese? Please help. Thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 921 • Replies: 27
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JGoldman10
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2021 11:30 pm
According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2021_Atlanta_spa_shootings :

" On March 16, 2021, a series of mass shootings occurred at three spas or massage parlors in the metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, United States. Eight people were killed, six of whom were Asian women, and one other person was wounded. A suspect, 21-year-old Robert Aaron Long, was taken into custody later that day.[2]

According to police, Long said he was motivated by a sexual addiction that was at odds with his religious beliefs. He had previously spent time in an evangelical treatment clinic for sex addiction. After the shootings, Long was charged with four counts of murder in Atlanta, and four counts of murder and one count of aggravated assault in Cherokee County.

Although Long has not been charged with a hate crime as part of the ongoing investigation, some commentators have characterized the shootings as a hate crime, noting the backdrop of rising anti-Asian sentiment in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic. "
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 02:02 am
@JGoldman10,
If you think someone driving around three different establishments and targeting victims based on their race and gender isn’t racially motivated, you’re a racist.

This is you victim blaming again, because these women worked in an industry you don’t 100% approve of then they are responsible for their own deaths.
Rebelofnj
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 03:59 am
@JGoldman10,
If you can read through the Wikipedia page, than you can find the answers on your own, on the Wikipedia page itself or in the news references at the end.
JGoldman10
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 06:21 am
@Rebelofnj,
I read it, thank you. Nothing in the article indicated his motive for killing was political.

A young man was struggling with sexual addictions and his religious beliefs. He took it upon himself to "eliminate sex temptation" by "targeting spas" which is psychotic.

No need for the rudeness. Don't try to insult my intelligence.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 06:27 am
@izzythepush,
I asked if what the young man did was POLITICALLY-motivated.

RACE is not an issue here.
Rebelofnj
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 06:34 am
@JGoldman10,
According to the Wikipedia page that you said you read, race as a motive cannot be ruled out.

Not to mention, certain government officials have repeatedly blamed China for the pandemic, which has fueled anti-Asian hate crimes in the last few months.

The Wikipedia page has all of this.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 07:16 am
Blaming Asian American women for the Covid-19 pandemic and crisis is just as racist as thinking and assuming all Arab Muslims are terrorists.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 07:19 am
@JGoldman10,
Quote:
I asked if what the young man did was POLITICALLY-motivated.

Yes, but in your previous post you said:
Quote:
Nothing in the article indicated his motive for killing was political.

Why are you asking people to confirm what you already believe?

Here's an article that may give you a clearer idea of the killer's motivations. You can come to your own conclusion as to whether he was driven by racial hatred, political beliefs, or his religious faith:

Atlanta Suspect’s Fixation on Sex Is Familiar Thorn for Evangelicals

The man accused of killing eight people, including six women of Asian descent, blamed “sexual addiction,” a disputed term used in parts of evangelical culture.

Quote:
When Brad Onishi heard that the man accused of a rampage at three Atlanta-area spas told detectives that he had carried out the attacks as a way to eliminate his own temptations, the claim sounded painfully familiar.

Dr. Onishi, who grew up in a strict evangelical community in Southern California that emphasized sexual purity, had spent his teenage years tearing out any advertisements in surfing magazines that featured women in bikinis. He had traded his online passwords with friends to hold himself accountable. “We had a militant vigilance: Don’t let anything in the house that will tempt you sexually,” Dr. Onishi, now an associate professor of religious studies at Skidmore College, recalled.

The evangelical culture he was raised in, he said, “teaches women to hate their bodies, as the source of temptation, and it teaches men to hate their minds, which lead them into lust and sexual immorality.”

Robert Aaron Long, the suspect in the massacres that left eight people dead, told the police this week that he had a “sexual addiction,” and he had been a customer at two of the spas that he targeted. He was so intent on avoiding pornography that he blocked several websites on his computer and had sought help at a Christian rehab clinic. A former roommate said that Mr. Long agonized over the possibility of “falling out of God’s grace.”

When Mr. Long, 21, was arrested on Tuesday on his way to Florida, the police said, he told officers he had planned to carry out another attack on a business connected to the pornography industry.

Many people saw clear signs of misogyny and racism in the attacks, in which six of the victims were women of Asian descent.

But Mr. Long’s characterization of his motivations was also very recognizable to observers of evangelicalism and some evangelicals themselves. He seemed to have had a fixation on sexual temptation, one that can lead to despair among people who believe they are failing to follow the ideal of refraining from sex and even lust outside heterosexual marriage.

Combating pornography and improper sexual desire is an enduring theme within contemporary conservative evangelicalism. In churches, men partner in “accountability groups” to hold each other responsible for avoiding sexual temptation and other moral dangers. Others use “accountability software” like Covenant Eyes, which monitors screen activity and sends reports about pornography usage to a designated “ally.” Countless books promise spiritual and practical strategies for breaking free of the habit.

Historically, some evangelical leaders have also drawn a direct line between pornography and violence. James Dobson, the influential founder of Focus on the Family, recorded a video interview with Ted Bundy the day before the serial killer’s execution in 1989. Mr. Bundy’s message was that an “addiction” to pornography fueled his crimes.

“What a tragedy!” Mr. Dobson wrote later, referring to Mr. Bundy’s violence. “There is a possibility, at least, that it would not have occurred if that 13-year-old boy had never stumbled onto pornographic magazines in a garbage dump.”

In recent decades, many conservative evangelical leaders and their churches have begun to speak more frankly about sex. “It’s very openly talked about that God created sexuality, it’s something not to be ashamed of, and that God made it for his purposes,” said Anson McMahon, a pastor in Buford, Ga., who was a guest speaker at several summer trips for young people in the early 2000s at the Baptist church later attended by Mr. Long.

But if conversations around sexual issues have become more frank, the message that sex is reserved for straight married couples has remained unchanged.

Many Christians trace their condemnation of pornography back to Jesus. “I tell you that anyone who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her in his heart,” he is quoted saying in the Gospel of Matthew.

For Protestants in particular, whose faith prioritizes correct internal beliefs and spiritual attitudes, that passage has contributed to a worldview in which inappropriate sexual thoughts are just as sinful as wrong actions.

The problem with pornography, in this view, is how it affects the person’s mind and heart.

“Masturbation in and of itself, the act is a biological act,” said Heath Lambert, the lead pastor of First Baptist Church of Jacksonville, Fla., and author of a book for evangelical men struggling with pornography use. “What’s wrong is lust. What’s wrong is what happens in my heart.”

The attacks at the spas violated all church teachings, Dr. Lambert said, and he thought the obvious root of the violence was the pornography that the accused gunman “was using and trying to get away from.”

White evangelicals do not use pornography more than other demographics, said Samuel Perry, a sociologist at the University of Oklahoma who has researched the role of pornography in the lives of conservative Protestants. In fact, white evangelicals who regularly attend church look at pornography less than the general population.

But they report significantly more anguish around the practice. Almost 30 percent of white evangelicals say they feel depressed after using pornography, compared with 8.6 percent of white liberal Protestants and 19 percent of white Catholics, according to a survey Dr. Perry co-conducted in February as part of the Public Discourse and Ethics Survey. White evangelicals are also significantly more likely to report that they are “addicted” to pornography.

Dr. Perry described a phenomenon in some parts of evangelical culture that he called “sexual exceptionalism,” in which sexual sins are implied to be more serious than other categories.

“So many men boil down how they’re doing spiritually to how often they have looked at porn recently,” Dr. Perry said, reflecting on his research in evangelical settings. “Not whether they’d grown in their love toward others, given generously of their time, or spent time connecting with God, but if they masturbated.”

For some with experience in evangelical youth culture, Mr. Long’s fixation on sexual temptation was a reminder of a damaging approach to teaching young people how to address sexuality.

“It presents a very demeaning view of manhood,” said Rachael Denhollander, an evangelical advocate for sexual abuse victims. “Every time you teach a woman in the presence of a young man that it’s her responsibility to keep a man from lusting and that she has the power to keep him from sexual perversion by what she wears and what she does, what he hears is that it’s her fault.”/quote]
nyt
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 07:30 am
@JGoldman10,
Yes it is. Race is all part of politics.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 10:11 am
@JGoldman10,
JGoldman10 wrote:

Why did this guy kill six Asian women? If he blamed these women for the Covid-19 pandemic and crisis that is sick; they had nothing to do with that. Were the women in question Chinese?


This is you going down the line of victim blaming. What difference does it make if they were Chinese? Are you saying it’s better to kill a Chinese woman than a Thai or Japanese woman?

The virus originated in China, and all the people involved in spreading it at the beginning are all still in China or dead.

It has nothing to do with anyone of Asian extraction living in America right now even if they are of Chinese descent.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 12:29 pm
@JGoldman10,
There are two different issues here.

1) The actually internal state of mind of the shooter.
2) The ability of political groups to use the even as part of a political narrative.

As far as the internal state of mind of the shooter, I haven't seen any evidence that race was a factor.

Of course, as part of a broader political narrative, of course race was involved. This says more about the commenters than about reality... but that is how political narrative works.

You shouldn't confuse the two.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 08:28 pm
@izzythepush,
The Thai and Japanese aren't responsible for the pandemic and crisis, as far as I know. The virus didn't originate in Thailand and/or Japan. People are pointing fingers at the CHINESE.

It is wrong to kill ANY innocent women who are/were minding their business.
Rebelofnj
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 08:58 pm
@JGoldman10,
Racists don't actually care if the Asians they are targeting are the correct nationality. To racists, they all look the same.

Racist behavior like that has been around for centuries.
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 11:07 pm
@Rebelofnj,
The correct nationality and/or ethnicity.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 11:09 pm
Regarding whether or not the killings were politically-motivated or not, I was told on another site:

"No, it wasn't politically-motivated, the guy was just an overzealous Christian who targeted Asian spas because he believed they were connected to sex trafficking. But what really angered people was when an official from the Atlanta Sheriff Office claimed he the mass shooter 'was just having a bad day', while that same official was also promoting some racially charged merchandise linking Asians to Covid."
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 11:14 pm
@Rebelofnj,
Quote:
Racists don't actually care if the Asians they are targeting are the correct nationality. To racists, they all look the same.


That is an awfully broad statement to make. I am pretty sure it is false.

There is anti-Japanese racism in Korea for example. And Indians carry racist attitudes about caste from India to the US. There is no visual way to tell caste. To discriminate you have to get clues about family name and place of origin, and yet racism happens between Indians in the US.






maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2021 11:17 pm
@maxdancona,
Progressives have stolen the word "racist" to use in their own political narrative. It is a neat trick, if they control the word "racist" then they can insure that it will never apply to them.

Let's be clear, White progressives have hijacked the term to use to make them feel important.

Actual racism is more complex and often doesn't fit the liberal ideological narrative.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Mar, 2021 02:57 am
In an authoritarian regime, or in Trump’s case a wannabe authoritarian regime, it helps to have a scapegoat when things go wrong.

It used to be the Jews, but even the most diehard anti Semite conspiracy nut will have a hard time blaming them for Covid 19.

The virus may have originated in China but Trump’s response has been the most disorganised, chaotic and dysfunctional in the developed world. It was only when Biden became president that you got a coordinated response to the pandemic. Stupid people need simple solutions and blaming another group because they’re different is about as simple as you can get.

This killing is a response to the steady drip drip of Asian racism permeating society. The fact that the murderer is also some sex obsessed evangelical pervert does not detract from the racism, although I accept that his disgusting religion played a part.
maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Sun 28 Mar, 2021 07:39 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
The fact that the murderer is also some sex obsessed evangelical pervert does not detract from the racism


This is a factually incorrect statement. It doesn't make sense. You can't be a racist by accident.

If you hit a van full of of Asians, and most of the people who die are Asians... that doesn't make you a racist. It means that by bad luck, you happened to hit that bus.

You can't have racism without having intent. If we are now going to scream "racism" every time an Asian dies, then the word "racism" makes no sense.


 

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