1
   

How stupid is Trump?

 
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2022 05:29 am

https://iili.io/Up2c4n.jpg
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2022 05:35 am
@Region Philbis,
Being called anything Builder disapproves of is a compliment.
Region Philbis
 
  4  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2022 08:27 am

https://iili.io/Up8uHv.jpg

Albuquerque, NM


0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2022 07:44 am
Trump Lawyer Told Justice Dept. That Classified Material Had Been Returned

The lawyer signed a statement in June that all documents marked as classified and held in boxes in storage at Mar-a-Lago had been given back. The search at the former president’s home on Monday turned up more.

An inventory of the material taken from Mar-a-Lago on Monday showed that F.B.I. agents seized 11 sets of documents with some type of confidential or secret marking on them.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/08/13/us/politics/trump-classified-material-fbi.html


By Maggie Haberman and Glenn Thrush
Aug. 13, 2022

At least one lawyer for former President Donald J. Trump signed a written statement in June asserting that all material marked as classified and held in boxes in a storage area at Mr. Trump’s Mar-a-Lago residence and club had been returned to the government, four people with knowledge of the document said.

The written declaration was made after a visit on June 3 to Mar-a-Lago by Jay I. Bratt, the top counterintelligence official in the Justice Department’s national security division.

The existence of the signed declaration, which has not previously been reported, is a possible indication that Mr. Trump or his team were not fully forthcoming with federal investigators about the material. And it could help explain why a potential violation of a criminal statute related to obstruction was cited by the department as one basis for seeking the warrant used to carry out the daylong search of the former president’s home on Monday, an extraordinary step that generated political shock waves.

It also helps to further explain the sequence of events that prompted the Justice Department’s decision to conduct the search after months in which it had tried to resolve the matter through discussions with Mr. Trump and his team.

An inventory of the material taken from Mr. Trump’s home that was released on Friday showed that F.B.I. agents seized 11 sets of documents during the search with some type of confidential or secret marking on them, including some marked as “classified/TS/SCI” — shorthand for “top secret/sensitive compartmented information.” Information categorized in that fashion is meant to be viewed only in a secure government facility.

The search encompassed not just the storage area where boxes of material known to the Justice Department were being held but also Mr. Trump’s office and residence. The search warrant and inventory unsealed on Friday did not specify where in the Mar-a-Lago complex the documents marked as classified were found.

Mr. Trump said on Friday that he had declassified all the material in his possession while he was still in office. He did not provide any documentation that he had done so.

In an appearance on Fox News on Friday night, the right-wing writer John Solomon, whom Mr. Trump has designated as one of his representatives to interact with the National Archives, read a statement from the former president’s office claiming that Mr. Trump had a “standing order” that documents taken out of the Oval Office and brought to the White House residence “were deemed to be declassified the moment he removed them.”

A spokesman for the former president, Taylor Budowich, said on Saturday, “Just like every Democrat-fabricated witch hunt previously, the water of this unprecedented and unnecessary raid is being carried by a media willing to run with suggestive leaks, anonymous sources and no hard facts.”

The search warrant said F.B.I. agents were carrying out the search to look for evidence related to possible violations of the obstruction statute as well as the Espionage Act and a statute that bars the unlawful taking or destruction of government records or documents. No one has been charged in the case, and the search warrant on its own does not mean anyone will be.
More Coverage of the F.B.I. Search of Trump’s Home

Last year, officials with the National Archives discovered that Mr. Trump had taken a slew of documents and other government material with him when he left the White House at the end of his tumultuous term in January 2021. That material was supposed to have been sent to the archives under the terms of the Presidential Records Act.

Mr. Trump returned 15 boxes of material in January of this year. When archivists examined the material, they found many pages of documents with classified markings and referred the matter to the Justice Department, which began an investigation and convened a grand jury.

In the spring, the department issued a subpoena to Mr. Trump seeking additional documents that it believed may have been in his possession. The former president was repeatedly urged by advisers to return what remained, despite what they described as his desire to continue to hold onto some documents.

What we consider before using anonymous sources. How do the sources know the information? What’s their motivation for telling us? Have they proved reliable in the past? Can we corroborate the information? Even with these questions satisfied, The Times uses anonymous sources as a last resort. The reporter and at least one editor know the identity of the source.

In an effort to resolve the dispute, Mr. Bratt and other officials visited Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., in early June, briefly meeting Mr. Trump while they were there. Two of Mr. Trump’s lawyers, M. Evan Corcoran and Christina Bobb, spoke with Mr. Bratt and a small number of investigators he traveled with, people briefed on the meeting said.

Mr. Corcoran and Ms. Bobb showed Mr. Bratt and his team boxes holding material Mr. Trump had taken from the White House that were being kept in a storage area, the people said.

According to two people briefed on the visit, Mr. Bratt and his team left with additional material marked classified, and around that time also obtained the written declaration from a Trump lawyer attesting that all the material marked classified in the boxes had been turned over.

A short time after the meeting, according to people briefed on it, Mr. Bratt sent Mr. Corcoran an email telling him to get a more secure padlock for the room. Mr. Trump’s team complied.

The Justice Department also subpoenaed surveillance footage from Mar-a-Lago, including views from outside the storage room. According to a person briefed on the matter, the footage prompted concern among investigators about the handling of the material. It is not clear what time period that footage was from.

Over recent months, investigators were in contact with roughly half a dozen of Mr. Trump’s current aides who had knowledge of how the documents were handled, two people briefed on the approaches said. At least one witness provided the investigators with information that led them to want to further press Mr. Trump for material, according to a person familiar with the inquiry.

Concern about Mr. Trump’s cavalier handling of classified information dates back to the early days of his administration. When Mr. Trump left office, President Biden quickly took the extraordinary step of barring him from receiving the intelligence briefings traditionally provided to former presidents, saying that Mr. Trump could not be trusted because of his “erratic behavior.”

The security of classified information at Mar-a-Lago was also a concern for government officials even while Mr. Trump was in office. During his presidency, the government built what is known as a SCIF — a sensitive compartmented information facility — for Mr. Trump’s use while he was at the club.

Expressing alarm about the documents that were retrieved from Mar-a-Lago, the leaders of two House committees on Saturday called on Avril D. Haines, the director of national intelligence, to conduct an “immediate review and damage assessment” and provide a classified briefing to Congress about the potential harm done to national security.

“Former President Trump’s conduct has potentially put our national security at grave risk,” the committee leaders, Representatives Carolyn B. Maloney, Democrat of New York and the chairwoman of the Oversight Committee, and Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the Intelligence Committee, wrote to Ms. Haines.

On Thursday, Attorney General Merrick B. Garland made a public statement saying he had personally authorized the decision to seek the search warrant for Mr. Trump’s property, and he indicated that the Justice Department would have made such a move only after trying less invasive measures.

Shortly before Mr. Garland made the announcement, a person close to Mr. Trump reached out to a Justice Department official to pass along a message from the former president to the attorney general. Mr. Trump wanted Mr. Garland to know that he had been checking in with people around the country and found them to be enraged by the search.

The message Mr. Trump wanted conveyed, according to a person familiar with the exchange, was: “The country is on fire. What can I do to reduce the heat?”

The following day, as a judge unsealed the warrant and the inventory of items that the F.B.I. took, Mr. Trump alternately claimed he did nothing wrong and also made the baseless statement that officials may have planted evidence at his property during the search.



Quote:
“The country is on fire. What can I do to reduce the heat?


Really? Then stop pissing gasoline and put away the matches, traitor.
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2022 07:52 am
@izzythepush,
Pure gold badge of honor. Wear it well, make us proud!
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2022 07:53 am
@Region Philbis,
builder has a severe allergic reaction to truth. Too bad.
Frank Apisa
 
  3  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2022 08:26 am
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:

Trump Lawyer Told Justice Dept. That Classified Material Had Been Returned

The lawyer signed a statement in June that all documents marked as classified and held in boxes in storage at Mar-a-Lago had been given back. The search at the former president’s home on Monday turned up more.

An inventory of the material taken from Mar-a-Lago on Monday showed that F.B.I. agents seized 11 sets of documents with some type of confidential or secret marking on them.


I have it on good authority (Trump himself) that the lawyer acted without consulting him. If the lawyer had consulted him, he would have told the lawyer that there still were several other documents marked "classified" being retained.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2022 06:42 pm
@Builder,
What a stupid piece of tripe. You do not relieve boredom, you epitomize it. I look forward to people slapping down your stupid, stupid droning on and on. I wish you could/would offer something that contributes to a conversation, maybe affects it beyond simple derailment.

I think you have a need for continual mope slapping.

0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2022 06:44 pm
@Builder,
Maybe yes or maybe no, but he DOES know how to be a very good President. Unlike the Orange Shitgibbon.
0 Replies
 
NSFW (view)
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2022 04:14 am

https://iili.io/g3OTgt.jpg


0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2022 01:09 pm
Giuliani Is Told He Is a Target of Trump Election Inquiry in Georgia

Rudolph W. Giuliani, as former President Donald J. Trump’s personal lawyer, spearheaded efforts to keep Mr. Trump in power.

Rudolph W. Giuliani is set to appear in Atlanta on Wednesday after his lawyers unsuccessfully argued that he should be interviewed by video rather than in person.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/08/15/us/graham-georgia-investigation-trump.html

By Richard Fausset and Danny Hakim
Aug. 15, 2022Updated 1:29 p.m. ET

ATLANTA — Lawyers for Rudolph W. Giuliani have been told that he is a target of a criminal investigation in Georgia into election interference by Donald J. Trump and his advisers.

One of Mr. Giuliani’s lawyers said in an interview that he was notified on Monday. On the same day, a federal judge rejected efforts by another key Trump ally, Senator Lindsey Graham, to avoid giving testimony before a special grand jury in Atlanta.

Mr. Giuliani, who as Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer spearheaded efforts to keep Mr. Trump in power, emerged in recent weeks as a central figure in the inquiry being conducted by Fani T. Willis, the district attorney of Fulton County, Ga., which encompasses most of Atlanta.

Earlier this summer, prosecutors questioned witnesses before the special grand jury about Mr. Giuliani’s appearances before state legislative panels in December 2020, when he spent hours peddling false conspiracy theories about secret suitcases of Democratic ballots and corrupted voting machines.

For Mr. Giuliani, the former mayor of New York, the developments are the latest in a widening swath of trouble, though he got some good news recently when it emerged that he was unlikely to face charges in a federal criminal inquiry into his ties to Ukraine during the 2020 presidential campaign.

Mr. Giuliani is scheduled to appear before the special grand jury on Wednesday at a downtown Atlanta courthouse. His lawyer, Robert Costello, said in the interview that Mr. Giuliani would probably invoke attorney-client privilege if asked questions about his dealings with Mr. Trump. “If these people think he’s going to talk about conversations between him and President Trump, they’re delusional,” Mr. Costello said.

The rejection of Senator Graham’s effort to avoid testifying came in a written order from a Federal District Court judge in Atlanta, Leigh Martin May. Mr. Graham, a Republican of South Carolina, is now set to testify on Aug. 23.

The judge found that prosecutors had shown that there is “a special need for Mr. Graham’s testimony on issues relating to alleged attempts to influence or disrupt the lawful administration of Georgia’s 2022 elections.”

Lawyers for Mr. Graham have said that he was informed by prosecutors that he was a witness, not a target.

Prosecutors want his testimony for a number of reasons. Among them are two phone calls that Mr. Graham placed just after the 2020 election to Brad Raffensperger, the Georgia secretary of state, in which Mr. Graham inquired about ways to help Mr. Trump by invalidating certain mail-in votes.

Making a case against Trump. The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack is laying out a comprehensive narrative of President Donald J. Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election. Here are the main themes that have emerged so far from eight public hearings:

An unsettling narrative. During the first hearing, the committee described in vivid detail what it characterized as an attempted coup orchestrated by the former president that culminated in the assault on the Capitol. At the heart of the gripping story were three main players: Mr. Trump, the Proud Boys and a Capitol Police officer.

Creating election lies. In its second hearing, the panel showed how Mr. Trump ignored aides and advisers as he declared victory prematurely and relentlessly pressed claims of fraud he was told were wrong. “He’s become detached from reality if he really believes this stuff,” William P. Barr, the former attorney general, said of Mr. Trump during a videotaped interview.

Pressuring Pence. Mr. Trump continued pressuring Vice President Mike Pence to go along with a plan to overturn his loss even after he was told it was illegal, according to testimony laid out by the panel during the third hearing. The committee showed how Mr. Trump’s actions led his supporters to storm the Capitol, sending Mr. Pence fleeing for his life.

Fake elector plan. The committee used its fourth hearing to detail how Mr. Trump was personally involved in a scheme to put forward fake electors. The panel also presented fresh details on how the former president leaned on state officials to invalidate his defeat, opening them up to violent threats when they refused.

Strong arming the Justice Dept. During the fifth hearing, the panel explored Mr. Trump’s wide-ranging and relentless scheme to misuse the Justice Department to keep himself in power. The panel also presented evidence that at least half a dozen Republican members of Congress sought pre-emptive pardons.

The surprise hearing. Cassidy Hutchinson, ​​a former White House aide, delivered explosive testimony during the panel’s sixth session, saying that the president knew the crowd on Jan. 6 was armed, but wanted to loosen security. She also painted Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, as disengaged and unwilling to act as rioters approached the Capitol.

Planning a march. Mr. Trump planned to lead a march to the Capitol on Jan. 6 but wanted it to look spontaneous, the committee revealed during its seventh hearing. Representative Liz Cheney also said that Mr. Trump had reached out to a witness in the panel’s investigation, and that the committee had informed the Justice Department of the approach.

A “complete dereliction” of duty. In the final public hearing of the summer, the panel accused the former president of dereliction of duty for failing to act to stop the Capitol assault. The committee documented how, over 187 minutes, Mr. Trump had ignored pleas to call off the mob and then refused to say the election was over even a day after the attack.

Mr. Giuliani’s postelection activities on Mr. Trump’s behalf have created problems for him on a number of fronts. The House committee in Washington investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol has highlighted video footage of Mr. Giuliani’s activities in Georgia, and the scheme to create rival slates of presidential electors is also the subject of an intensifying investigation by the Department of Justice. Mr. Giuliani is among the subjects of civil suits by two makers of voting machines, Dominion and Smartmatic, that seek billions of dollars in damages.

Much of Mr. Giuliani’s conduct in Georgia was laid out last year by the New York State appellate court that suspended his law license. The court issued a 33-page report that mentioned Georgia 35 times and described “numerous false and misleading statements regarding the Georgia presidential election results” made by Mr. Giuliani. The court noted, for instance, that Mr. Giuliani had falsely claimed that tens of thousands of underage teenagers had voted illegally in Georgia, even though an audit by Georgia’s secretary of state found that no one under the age of 18 had voted in the 2020 election.

Mr. Giuliani was also a central figure in the Trump campaign’s plan to urge lawmakers in swing states to appoint different slates of electors than those chosen by voters, which is part of the Georgia inquiry as well as the Justice Department investigation.

A spokesman for the Fulton County district attorney’s office declined to comment on Monday. In the past, Ms. Willis has said the Georgia investigation could result in racketeering or conspiracy charges involving multiple defendants.

Norman Eisen, a lawyer who served as special counsel to the House Judiciary Committee during the first impeachment and trial of Mr. Trump, said he believed that identifying Mr. Giuliani as a target could mean that Mr. Trump will eventually be a target as well.

“There is no way Giuliani is a target of the D.A.’s investigation and Trump does not end up as one,” Mr. Eisen said in an interview Monday. “They are simply too entangled factually and legally in the attempt to use fake electors and other means to overturn the Georgia election results."

Lawyers for Mr. Giuliani have said that he did nothing improper in Georgia, and that he has been willing to cooperate. But they have been sparring with Ms. Willis’s office over her efforts to get him to testify before the grand jury. Mr. Giuliani’s lawyers have said a doctor recommended that Mr. Giuliani not travel by air because of a procedure he underwent in early July to insert cardiac stents, and they have sought to delay his testimony or have it conducted by video conference, an idea the district attorney’s office has resisted.

Judge Robert C.I. McBurney of Fulton County Superior Court said last week that Mr. Giuliani could travel to Atlanta “on a train, on a bus or Uber,” and set a date for Wednesday, after agreeing to delay his appearance for more than a week. Mr. Giuliani’s lawyers indicated that in any case, their client would have little to say if he was designated as a target of the investigation.

“I think it would be meanspirited to make — as a target, to make him travel down here, particularly by these alternative means, when there likely would not be very much testimony before the grand jury,” another Giuliani attorney, William H. Thomas Jr., said after a court hearing.

At least 17 other people have already been designated as targets who could face charges in the investigation, including two state senators and the head of the state Republican Party.

Lawyers for Mr. Graham had based their argument on the Constitution’s speech and debate clause, which shields lawmakers from being questioned over things they say that are related to their official duties. Among other things, they also argued that Mr. Graham, as a high-ranking official, could only be called under “extraordinary circumstances.”

Judge May ruled that prosecutors had shown that such extraordinary circumstances exist.

Mr. Graham has argued that his phone calls to Mr. Raffensperger were protected under the speech and debate clause because they were investigatory in nature, and were related to his position, at the time, as chairman of the Judiciary Committee. But the judge, in her order, noted that “individuals on the calls have publicly suggested that Senator Graham was not simply engaged in legislative fact-finding,” and was “seeking to influence Secretary Raffensperger’s actions” to benefit Mr. Trump. (Mr. Raffensperger has said that Mr. Graham seemed to suggest to him that he find a way to discard legally cast ballots.)

Judge May’s ruling essentially left it to the state court to determine which elements of Mr. Graham’s calls should be shielded in accordance with the speech and debate clause.

But she also noted that, beyond the phone calls, there were numerous other items of interest to the special grand jury that were unquestionably fair game, including Mr. Graham’s “potential communications and coordination with the Trump campaign and its postelection efforts in Georgia.”

Prosecutors are demanding that two other lawyers for the Trump team, Jenna Ellis and John Eastman, appear before the special grand jury as well. The participation of Ms. Ellis, a Colorado resident, will be addressed in a court hearing scheduled for Tuesday in Fort Collins, Colo. A similar hearing will be held for Mr. Eastman, a New Mexico resident, at a courthouse in Santa Fe, N.M. on Wednesday.

Mr. Costello, the lawyer for Mr. Giuliani, was asked by a reporter on Monday what means of transportation his client would use as he made his way to Atlanta from New York.

“No comment,” Mr. Costello said.
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  3  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2022 01:59 pm
I love hearing that these guys are all going to have to testify.

They lie so much...it has become a habit difficult to turn off.

My guess...most of them will spend time in prison for perjury.

Hey, they got Al Capone on tax evasion...not murder or booze running.

Whatever does the job.
snood
 
  4  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2022 02:20 pm
@Frank Apisa,
Frank Apisa wrote:



My guess...most of them will spend time in prison for perjury.




From your keyboard to God’s eyes
0 Replies
 
Builder
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2022 04:45 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
Here's some truth you'd rather avoid, Robert.

https://www.conservapedia.com/Rosemont_Seneca_Partners

Five months into the Obama administration in June 2009 Hunter Biden and Chris Heinz, stepson of Senate Foreign Relations Committee chair John Kerry formed Rosemount Seneca. The firm partnered with the Thornton Group run by James Bulger,[4] and the Bank of China, to form Bohai Harvest RST (BHR) in China. Devon Archer is a longtime friend of former Secretary of State John Kerry and of stepson Chris Heinz and James Bulger, the nephew of notorious Boston gangster Whitey Bulger.[5]

The Bank of China is owned by the Chinese government and closely connected with the Chinese military and intelligence services. Biden, Heinz, and Archer transferred and sold "duel use" technology to the Chinese military which was used to create the Chinese drone program and replicate the Chinese version of the F-15 fighter.[6]

Bohai Harvest RST (BHR) invested in an app the Chinese leftwing communist government is using to surveil ethnic minority Muslims in western China. Over one million Muslims living in the region are now incarcerated in Chinese gulags.
Builder
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2022 02:06 am
@Builder,
Remembering always that the "big guy" in all of Hunter's dealings with China and the Ukraine, is the feeble old fella pretending to be your current president. So how stupid are all of your fakers, when this information has been available to everyone, since before the bogus election?
hightor
 
  4  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2022 03:14 am
@Builder,
What's this have to do with Trump?

No one knows what you're trying to say, other than spouting a lot of well-worn, irrelevant, conservative talking points. Surprised you didn't work Pizzagate into it somehow.

Quote:
So how stupid are all of your fakers, when this information has been available to everyone, since before the bogus election?


Read that back to yourself. Try that every time you post something.
Builder
 
  -4  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2022 03:16 am
@hightor,
Quote:
No one knows what you're trying to say


That makes you as dumb as dogshit mate. And you call yourself a moderator? Hhahahahahahah.

https://nypost.com/2021/11/29/joe-biden-expected-10-percent-cut-in-deal-with-a-chinese-giant/
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2022 03:20 am
@Builder,
Quote:
Hhahahahahahah.


You still haven't managed to show how any of this relates to Trump's stupidity. It's almost like you're trying to change the subject.
Builder
 
  -4  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2022 03:22 am
@hightor,
Everything is relative.

Your current peanut doesn't know if he's Arthur or Martha.

Such a valuable asset to the controllers.
 

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