13
   

How stupid is Trump?

 
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2021 05:01 am
@Builder,
Quote:
You believe Biden, who wouldn't know what day of the week it is, can be your leader.


He's pretty nimble here:

https://streamable.com/fgd9zk

snood
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2021 05:43 am
@hightor,
Nice one
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Fri 30 Jul, 2021 09:46 am
Trump Pressed Justice Dept. to Declare Election Results Corrupt, Notes Show

“Leave the rest to me” and to congressional allies, the former president is said to have told top law enforcement officials.

Quote:
WASHINGTON — President Donald J. Trump pressed top Justice Department officials late last year to declare that the election was corrupt even though they had found no instances of widespread fraud, so that he and his allies in Congress could use the assertion to try to overturn the results, according to new documents provided to lawmakers and obtained by The New York Times.

The demands were an extraordinary instance of a president interfering with an agency that is typically more independent from the White House to advance his personal agenda. They are also the latest example of Mr. Trump’s wide-ranging campaign during his final weeks in office to delegitimize the election results.

The exchange unfolded during a phone call on Dec. 27 in which Mr. Trump pressed the acting attorney general at the time, Jeffrey A. Rosen, and his deputy, Richard P. Donoghue, on voter fraud claims that the department had disproved. Mr. Donoghue warned that the department had no power to change the outcome of the election. Mr. Trump replied that he did not expect that, according to notes Mr. Donoghue took memorializing the conversation.

“Just say that the election was corrupt + leave the rest to me” and to congressional allies, Mr. Donoghue wrote in summarizing Mr. Trump’s response.

Mr. Trump did not name the lawmakers, but at other points during the call he mentioned Representative Jim Jordan of Ohio, whom he described as a “fighter”; Representative Scott Perry of Pennsylvania, who at the time promoted the idea that the election was stolen from Mr. Trump; and Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, whom Mr. Trump praised for “getting to bottom of things.”

The notes connect Mr. Trump’s allies in Congress with his campaign to pressure Justice Department officials to help undermine, or even nullify, the election results.

The lawmakers did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Mr. Jordan ultimately voted to overturn the election results in key states, but has downplayed his role in the president’s pressure campaign. Mr. Perry continues to assert Mr. Trump won, but has not been tied directly to the White House effort to keep him in office. And Mr. Johnson, whom Mr. Trump recently endorsed as he weighs whether to seek a third term, maintains that it is reasonable to have questions about the integrity of the election, though he has recognized Joseph R. Biden Jr. as president.

The Justice Department provided Mr. Donoghue’s notes to the House Oversight and Reform Committee, which is investigating the Trump administration’s efforts to unlawfully reverse the election results.

Typically, the department has fought to keep secret any accounts of private discussions between a president and his cabinet to avoid setting a precedent that would prevent officials in future administrations from candidly advising presidents out of concern that their conversations would later be made public.

But handing over the notes to Congress is part of a pattern of allowing scrutiny of Mr. Trump’s efforts to overturn the election. The Biden Justice Department also told Mr. Rosen, Mr. Donoghue and other former officials this week that they could provide unrestricted testimony to investigators with the House Oversight and Reform and the Senate Judiciary Committees.

The department reasoned that congressional investigators were examining potential wrongdoing by a sitting president, an extraordinary circumstance, according to letters sent to the former officials. Because executive privilege is meant to benefit the country, rather than the president as an individual, invoking it over Mr. Trump’s efforts to push his personal agenda would be inappropriate, the department concluded.

“These handwritten notes show that President Trump directly instructed our nation’s top law enforcement agency to take steps to overturn a free and fair election in the final days of his presidency,” Representative Carolyn B. Maloney, Democrat of New York and chairwoman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, said in a statement.

Mr. Trump’s conversation with Mr. Rosen and Mr. Donoghue reflected his single-minded focus on overturning the election results. At one point, Mr. Trump alleged voter fraud in Georgia, Michigan, Nevada and Arizona, which he called “corrupted elections.” Mr. Donoghue pushed back.

“Much of the info you’re getting is false,” Mr. Donoghue said, adding that the department had conducted “dozens of investigations, hundreds of interviews” and not found evidence to support his claims. “We look at allegations but they don’t pan out,” the officials told Mr. Trump, according to the notes.

The department found that the error rate of ballot counting in Michigan was 0.0063 percent, not the 68 percent that the president asserted; it did not find evidence of a conspiracy theory that an employee in Pennsylvania had tampered with ballots; and after examining video and interviewing witnesses, it did not find evidence of ballot fraud in Fulton County, Ga., according to the notes.

Mr. Trump, undeterred, brushed off the department’s findings. “Ok fine — but what about the others?” Mr. Donoghue wrote in his notes describing the president’s remarks. Mr. Trump asked Mr. Donoghue to travel to Fulton County to verify signatures on ballots.

The people “saying that the election isn’t corrupt are corrupt,” Mr. Trump told the officials, adding that they needed to act. “Not much time left.”

At another point, Mr. Donoghue said that the department could quickly verify or disprove the assertion that more ballots were cast in Pennsylvania than there are voters.

“Should be able to check on that quickly, but understand that the DOJ can’t and won’t snap it’s fingers and change the outcome of the election, doesn’t work that way,” Mr. Donoghue wrote in his notes.

The officials also told Mr. Trump that the Justice Department had no evidence to support a lawsuit regarding the election results. “We are not in a position based on the evidence. We can only act on the actual evidence developed,” they said.

Mr. Trump castigated the officials, saying that “thousands of people called” their local U.S. attorney’s offices to complain about the election and that “nobody trusts the F.B.I.” He said that “people are angry — blaming D.O.J. for inaction.”

“You guys may not be following the internet the way I do,” Mr. Trump said, according to the document.

In a moment of foreshadowing, Mr. Trump said, “people tell me Jeff Clark is great, I should put him in,” referring to the acting head of the Justice Department’s civil division, who had also encouraged department officials to intervene in the election. “People want me to replace D.O.J. leadership.”

“You should have the leadership you want,” Mr. Donoghue replied. But it “won’t change the dept’s position.”

Mr. Donoghue and Mr. Rosen did not know that Mr. Perry had introduced Mr. Clark and Mr. Trump. Exactly one week later, they would be forced to fight Mr. Clark for their jobs in an Oval Office showdown.

During the call, Mr. Trump also told the Justice Department officials to “figure out what to do” with Hunter Biden, President Biden’s son. “People will criticize the D.O.J. if he’s not investigated for real,” he told them, violating longstanding guidelines against the White House interfering in criminal investigations or other law enforcement actions.

Two days after the phone call with Mr. Trump, Mr. Donoghue took notes of a meeting between Justice Department officials: Mr. Trump’s chief of staff, Mark Meadows; the White House counsel, Pat Cipollone; and White House deputy counsel Patrick Philbin met to discuss a conspiracy theory known as Italygate, which asserts without evidence that people in Italy used military technology to remotely tamper with voting machines in the United States.

The Justice Department officials told the White House that they had assigned someone to look into the matter, according to the notes and a person briefed on the meeting. They did not mention that the department was looking into the theory in order to debunk it, the person said.

nyt
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2021 10:27 am
@hightor,
It was supposed to take 60 days to recount the votes in the 2020 U.S. presidential election in Maricopa County. 100 days later, the self-appointed audit commission in the largest county in the state of Arizona has still not found any election fraud - but it has strained the nerves of local politicians.

Maricopa County: Final Signed Letter to Senators

In Arizona, Republican Senator Michelle Ungenti-Rita is considered the strongest supporter of the voter fraud theory. Last week, she wrote on Twitter that the scrutiny of the election process had been "botched."
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  3  
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2021 03:13 pm
A Trump bombshell quietly dropped last week. And it should shock us all
Robert Reich

We’ve become so inured to Donald Trump’s proto-fascism that we barely blink an eye when we learn that he tried to manipulate the 2020 election. Yet the most recent revelation should frighten every American to their core.

On Friday, the House oversight committee released notes of a 27 December telephone call from Trump to then acting attorney general Jeffrey Rosen, in which Trump told Rosen: “Just say the election was corrupt + leave the rest to me and the R congressmen.” The notes were taken by Richard Donoghue, Rosen’s deputy, who was also on the call.

The release of these notes has barely made a stir. The weekend news was filled with more immediate things – infrastructure! The Delta strain! Inflation! Wildfires! In light of everything else going on, Trump’s bizarre efforts in the last weeks of his presidency seem wearily irrelevant. Didn’t we already know how desperate he was?

In a word, no. This revelation is hugely important.

Rosen obviously rejected Trump’s request. But what if Rosen had obeyed Trump and said to the American public that the election was corrupt – and then “left the rest” to Trump and the Republican congressmen? What would Trump’s and the Republicans’ next moves have been? And which Republican congressmen were in cahoots with Trump in this attempted coup d’état?

Make no mistake: this was an attempted coup.

Trump knew it. Just weeks earlier, then attorney general William Barr said the justice department had found no evidence of widespread fraud that could have overturned the results.

And a few days after Trump’s call to Rosen – on 2 January – Trump told Brad Raffensperger, Georgia’s secretary of state, to “find” votes to change the election outcome. He berated Raffensperger for not doing more to overturn the election.

Emails released last month also show that Trump and his allies in the last weeks of his presidency pressured the justice department to investigate totally unsubstantiated claims of widespread election fraud – forwarding them conspiracy theories and even a draft legal brief they hoped would be filed with the supreme court.

Some people, especially Republican officeholders, believe we should simply forget these sordid details. We must not.

For the first time in the history of the United States we did not have a peaceful transition of power. For the first time in American history, a president refused – still refuses – to concede, and continues to claim, with no basis in fact, that the election was “stolen” from him. For the first time in history, a president actively plotted a coup.

It would have been bad enough were Trump a mere crackpot acting on his own pathetic stage – a would-be dictator who accidentally became president and then, when he lost re-election, went bonkers – after which he was swept into the dustbin of history.

We might then merely regret this temporary lapse in American presidential history. At best, Trump would be seen as a fool and the whole affair an embarrassment to the country.

But Trump was no accident and he’s not in any dustbin. He has turned one of America’s two major parties into his own cult. He has cast the major political division in the US as a clash between those who believe him about the 2020 election and those who do not. He has emboldened state Republicans to execute the most brazen attack on voting rights since Jim Crow. Most Republican senators and representatives dare not cross him. Some of his followers continue to threaten violence against the government. By all accounts, he is running for president again in 2024.

Donald Trump’s proto-fascism poses the largest internal threat to American democracy since the civil war.

What to do about it? Fight it, and the sooner the better.

This final revelation – Trump’s 27 December call to the acting attorney general in which he pleads “Just say the election was corrupt + leave the rest to me” – should trigger section 3 of the 14th amendment, which bars anyone from holding office who “engaged in insurrection” against the US. The current attorney general of the United States, Merrick Garland, should issue an advisory opinion clearly stating this. If Trump wants to take it to the supreme court, fine.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/aug/03/donald-trump-memo-election-corrupt-justice-department

Robert Reich, a former US secretary of labor, is professor of public policy at the University of California at Berkeley and the author of Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few and The Common Good. His new book, The System: Who Rigged It, How We Fix It, is out now. He is a columnist for The Guardian US
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2021 03:31 am
Trump works for Putin
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Mon 9 Aug, 2021 12:42 pm

https://iili.io/RI3tHu.jpg
snood
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Aug, 2021 02:09 pm
@Region Philbis,
I’ve been seeing stories for months, saying that every authority in the land is telling Trump he has to release his tax returns.

But, just like all the indictments that the NY AG was supposed to be readying to spring on Trump when he left office, what do we get?

BUPKIS
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Aug, 2021 02:54 pm

trump-wannabe Qaren T Greene gets kicked off twitter again, this time for a week...
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Aug, 2021 11:13 am
Campaigners granted leave to challenge government’s decision not to seek ‘McMafia order’ into unexplained wealth

Scottish judge permits legal case over Trump’s golf course spending
Quote:
The global campaign group Avaaz has been allowed to take legal action over the Scottish government’s refusal to investigate the source of Donald Trump’s wealth.

A Scottish judge has granted Avaaz permission to challenge a decision by ministers to reject calls for an unexplained wealth order (UWO) into how Trump raised the hundreds of millions of pounds spent on his two Scottish golf courses near Aberdeen and Turnberry.

Known as “McMafia orders”, they give Scottish prosecutors and courts the legal power to investigate how people, such as senior figures in organised crime, came by the money used to buy homes, cars, yachts and other assets.

The court’s decision is the latest blow for Trump and his family, who are under numerous investigations by prosecutors in the US over the former president’s tax affairs and finances.

The Trump Organization robustly rejects allegations that the former president used unlawful sources to finance his golf courses in Scotland; his son Eric Trump has said the family used its own money to do so.

Attention has focused on whether Trump borrowed the money from Deutsche Bank, or from unknown overseas backers, including Russian sources. So far, there has been no proof of any illicit funding of Trump’s businesses.

Avaaz, a crowd-sourced campaign group, took the case after Scottish ministers rejected calls from Patrick Harvie, the Scottish Greens co-leader, and other MSPs for an investigation into how Trump bought and funded both courses.

Humza Yousaf, the then justice secretary, told Harvie that a decision to pursue a UWO was solely a matter for the lord advocate, Scotland’s chief prosecutor, whose decisions had to be “free of political interference”.

After Harvie challenged that, the government admitted that ministers had the responsibility to request a McMafia order investigation. Even so, the Scottish National party and Conservatives rejected a Holyrood motion from the Greens, backed by Labour and the Liberal Democrats, calling for one earlier this year by 89 to 32 votes.

Before the vote, Eric Trump said: “Patrick Harvie is nothing more than a national embarrassment with his pathetic antics that only serve himself and his political agenda.”

In a ruling issued on Wednesday by the court of session, Scotland’s civil court, Lord Sandison said he believed the Avaaz case “had real prospects of success [and that] there was a sensible legal argument to be had on the matters raised by the petition”.

Nick Flynn, the legal director at Avaaz, said: “Armed with a proper understanding of the law, we hope ministers agree that Trump’s purchase demands the transparency that only a UWO can bring. Scotland’s reputation for upholding the rule of law and combating money laundering depends on it.”

Harvie said: “I’m glad we are a step forward in getting some clarity over why Trump’s business dealings in Scotland haven’t been investigated. It should never have got to the stage of a legal challenge from an NGO for the Scottish government to confirm or deny whether they will seek a McMafia order.”

Trump’s critics believe there are significance questions about how he financed the original purchase of both Menie, north of Aberdeen, in 2008, and the conversion of what was then a small coastal country estate into an 18-hole championship golf course with boutique hotel.

That was followed by Trump’s purchase of the far larger Turnberry golf resort and its five-star hotel in 2014.

Trump spent tens of millions of pounds upgrading the hotel, adding a new ballroom, then redesigned both Turnberry’s golf courses. Overall, the Trump project is estimated to have cost in excess of £120m.

Recent accounts show the Turnberry business owes Trump £114m, and the Aberdeenshire estate £44m.

Sandison allowed the Avaaz application to proceed even though it was technically time-barred, and also decided a future judicial review could investigate Trump’s finances, not just the dry technical question of whether ministers can order a UWO inquiry.

After rejecting the government’s protests that the petition was filed too late, the judge ruled there were clear matters of public importance raised by the Avaaz case.

“The question comes to be whether the petition raises matters of such live and substantive public importance as to render it in the interests of justice to allow it to proceed out of time,” Sandison said.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  0  
Reply Wed 11 Aug, 2021 03:57 pm

another trump-like idiot gets a slap on the wrist...

YouTube suspends Rand Paul for seven days
(cnn)
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Aug, 2021 05:31 am
Gee, I guess it's sayonara for Joe and Kamala:

https://i.imgur.com/VkJCihE.jpg
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Aug, 2021 05:47 am
@hightor,
hightor wrote:

Gee, I guess it's sayonara for Joe and Kamala:

https://i.imgur.com/VkJCihE.jpg


Why anyone would want to make a complete ass of himself for the sake of Trump is beyond me...but whatever the reason, I am happy Lindell did it. He did a bang-up job of it...and no one is more worthy of having done it.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Aug, 2021 12:12 pm

https://iili.io/RAw3B9.jpg
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  0  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2021 03:32 am

https://iili.io/RAb7Fn.jpg
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2021 04:30 am
@Region Philbis,
Region Philbis wrote:


https://iili.io/RAb7Fn.jpg


Okay, okay...that made me laugh out loud!

0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2021 08:46 am
@Region Philbis,
Region Philbis wrote:


https://iili.io/RAb7Fn.jpg


Just wanted to 'fess up that I have already "borrowed" this for another forum...in a discussion where it fit like a glove.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 21 Aug, 2021 09:07 am
Ex-president Trump was due to stage a rally in Alabama tonight, in a city that has declared a Covid emergency and in support of a congressman who both backed Trump’s attempt to overturn the election and this week sympathised with a man who threatened to blow up the US Capitol.

In a statement on Saturday, Trump said he expected a “huge crowd and tremendous enthusiasm” as there was “much to discuss, mostly having to do with bringing our country back”. Local media reported that organisers expected about 40,000 to attend at York Farms.
The Guardian
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Aug, 2021 09:25 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I believe that Trump is a nihilist.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  2  
Reply Sun 22 Aug, 2021 03:47 am
Is the ‘Biden and other Contemporary’ thread closed? When I try to post there, it just bumps me to the launch page of the topic.
 

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