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How do pro voice actors end up working on multiple projects and for more than one studio at once?

 
 
Reply Wed 27 May, 2020 11:21 pm
Hi. I am curious about this. There are a lot of big-name pro voice actors, past and present. Many of them work or have worked on more than one project at once and sometimes for more than one studio at once.

For example, Mel Blanc, who was nicknamed "The Man Of A Thousand Voices", was perhaps the most prolific pro voice actor in history. He was well known for voicing most of the Looney Tunes characters (on occasion he voiced Elmer Fudd) for most of his career. He also did voice work for other studios like Hanna-Barbera and Disney.

The Jetsons Movie and Who Framed Roger Rabbit? were two of the last animated projects he provided voice work for before he passed.

As another example, Jim Cummings has provided voice work for a number of Disney and Warner Bros. cartoon shows in the '90s. He was the only voice actor to work on all classic Disney Afternoon shows at the same time, and around the same time he also worked on classic WB cartoon shows like Tiny Toons and Taz Mania.

How do pro voice actors work on multiple projects at once and also moonlight for more than one studio at once?

I don't know all the particulars but I assume agents are involved? Agents help book gigs and find work? Agents help work out contract negotiations for voice actors?

Please help. Thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 505 • Replies: 9
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JGoldman10
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 31 May, 2020 03:47 am
So no one here knows the answer to the topic question?
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izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 May, 2020 04:18 am
@JGoldman10,
Actors, not just voice actors, are no longer tied to one studio.

Back in the 1960s the BBC kicked up one hell of a fuss when Perry and Croft wanted to cast Arthur Lowe as Captain Mainwaring in Dad's Army because he was an ITV actor.

Perry and Croft got their way and it started a long chain of actors moving about and independent content makers working for multiple broadcasters.

I assume it's the same in America.
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Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 May, 2020 04:55 am
@JGoldman10,
That’s called freelancing.
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JGoldman10
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2020 02:02 pm
I asked the topic question on another site and these were the best answers I was given:

"The studio system ended a long time ago. Under that system, actors mostly signed exclusive contract with a single studio. It's akin to how pro athletes only play for one team. But for decades now actors have been essentially independent contractors who work on a given tv show or movie for a studio and then move on to something else. The studio has no claim on their time or labor outside of the contracted project their working on."

"A studio no longer keep actors on staff (the studio system was abolished around 1948). Actors are more free agents now and are contracted to work project by project.

Production companies hire a casting director (CD) to find actors. If the CD knows someone who would be good for a role, they contact the agent to have the actor submit an audition/demo tape. Or the CD will contact agents with information about a role and the agents will submit actors to audition. If the company is interested in hiring the actor, they contact the agent who negotiates the contract

In the US most professional productions are union, meaning the production company has an agreement with the SAG-AFTRA union so preference are given to actors who are members of the union. The union also sets things like the minimum pay for actors and specifics work conditions and other reimbursement. Agents can negotiate beyond those minimums. But companies do not hold open auditions that anyone can go to. They are looking for actors who have demonstrated they can work at a professional level.

As for working multiple projects - a production company has people whose job is to schedule things. If an actor is working multiple projects then the production schedule is set up to accommodate them. If there is a scheduling conflict, then they company hires another actor. With advances in technology, many voice actors have their own studio set-up so they can record audition and demo tapes themselves and maybe even produce work for a project themselves. This may make it easier to work multiple projects. And there's a lot of additional work that goes into a project besides just recording the voices.

Remember this is show business. People are in it to make money, not reward the “right” person with a voice over career. Companies invest a lot of money in their projects so they are looking for trained and experienced professionals.

Professional voice actors are basically starting and running a company where they are the product being marketed and sold. They need to understand the industry And how they fit in. They need to understand legal issues (contracts, unions, taxes); marketing (demo reels, websites, show reels); networking and the like. People are not just discovered and given a career. It’s a huge investment of time, effort and money."
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tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jun, 2020 09:32 am
Since you're trying to become a voice actor (eventually), you really need to stay up to date on the industry and STOP fetishizing people and protocols/procedures that are out of date/decades old and very likely not applicable with the current way the industry works.
Grand Alliance Smartphone Game Pulls Voice Actor Casting Call After Criticisms of $1 Per Line Rate
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jun, 2020 11:25 am
@tsarstepan,
I'm not fetishizing anyone. I know the voice acting business has changed since the '80s and '90s. A lot of things are done digitally now.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jun, 2020 11:37 am
@tsarstepan,
Yes, I have a bunch of fictional characters I created I would like to provide voices for; I would like to learn how to voice act professionally so I can properly voice most if not all of them. I'd like to voice a lot of my own characters for my own cartoons and hire a few voice actors to voice characters with me. I can also use voice changers for certain characters. This will save me a lot of production time and money.
I have been trying my hand at vocal characterizations. I have created voices for a lot of original characters and I've tried tweaking some of them using voice changers. I still want to learn how to voice act professionally. I have the potential to be a good voice actor.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jun, 2020 12:42 pm
@tsarstepan,
"Eventually" is probably the right word. I'm not being negative. At this point in time, especially with the Covid-19 crisis still going on, I'm not even sure I'm going to be able to get the training I want and need to learn how to voice act professionally this year. My old art school is offering courses in voice acting through their Continuing Ed Dept. for the upcoming term but the CE Dept. Is not even sure their courses are going to be available for anyone to take in person.

I don't know if I will have the money to pay for them this year or if I can even reach the school to get to them.

I hope they can offer these courses online but I don't know how that's going to work.

I hope I can pursue some venue with which I can get training to learn how to voice act professionally for free.

I still have a lot of things in my personal life I need to take care of and deal with.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jun, 2020 01:08 pm
@JGoldman10,
You always are obstinately stuck in your methods and ways. I'm pretty sure the school you referred to is an unaccredited, for-profit one (I thought I remember you mentioned this before). Not worth your time and money.

I wouldn't be surprised that the following online streaming course system (not a fly by night one at that) is much cheaper at its full price than the school you keep going on about.
https://imgur.com/SN3NKFr.jpg
https://www.udemy.com/course/beavoiceactor/

And Skillshare has dozens of promocodes from their various ad sponsorships that make them accessible and approachable financially wise.

https://www.skillshare.com/browse/voice-over
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