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Why isn't there a male version of Charlie's Angels?

 
 
blatham
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 08:55 am
@chai2,
Quote:
Like I said, I'm not trying to offend you, but ya know, it is kinda offensive to me that anyone thinks the only way me, or any woman can justify enjoying a sexy, or sex show, is by acting all fluttery and quintessentially girly/childish/child like.

That's fine, maybe you're not being offensive, and I just find it so, and that's my thing, not yours. I'm a big girl, and my being offended isn't your problem.
No offence taken. In writing that bit, I recognized the danger of furthering the perceptions/ideas you correctly criticize re women's sexuality versus various cartoon versions that our culture (and patriarchy) often present as "proper" or "natural" female sexuality. I was on a joke writing exercise but I got sloppy and the piece wasn't really very funny. I think your criticism is quite valid. Sorry.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 10:09 am
@blatham,
Thanks blatham for your thoughtful response.

I regret writing "there's a lot of uncomfortable people here".

At the moment, it just felt like a line of jokes was starting up because people didn't know what (maybe among other things) to do with our western culture of the need for propriety on the surface for women concerning sexual things. That's not just aimed at men.

I've been in one on one and small group conversations with other women about medical/health things reproductive/sexual.
Even in that context, it's amazing how many women, of all ages, will look slightly startled when hearing, or needing to say words like "vagina, clitoris, etc" Even when discussing visits to doctors.
I imagine when they hear their sexual lives cloaked in jokes, it seals in the idea that part of their lives isn't to be taken seriously.

Believe me, when I say seriously, I'm not talking about being all clinical and/or militant about it. There's that middle ground.

blatham
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 10:37 am
@chai2,
I think you're right. I ought not to have contributed in the manner I did as, regardless of my intentions, it was a furtherance of a cliched portrayal of women which infantilizes and degrades their own sexual agency.

One happy element in all this is the rise to prominence of female comics like Chelsea Handler or Amy Schumer or Margaret Cho who are purposefully up front and unrepentant about their own sexuality.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 11:20 am
@blatham,
If you're interested, there's this netflix series called "Unbelieveable" It's just one season.

Two of the main characters, the detectives, are both female. Played by Toni Collette and Merritt Wever.

They have very different personalities, and approaches.

In one of the early episodes, Wever was directing her team. (Omg, so funny, I was really going to type "communicating with her team". No, she was directing them)
During that scene, for one split second I thought, "wow, she's being a bit bitchy" Then I realized. "No she isn't. She's talking to them with authority. She doesn't have time for touchy feely." In other words, she was talking to them like a man. Holding them accountable to what they have, and haven't done.

Looking around on youtube, here's a good scene.



I absolutley love the part where one detective goes off on "Where is the outrage?" I mean, justifiably and all, but it certainly deserved this response...


"It is (fucked up). But you sittin' out here, screaming into the wind, does nothing to un-**** it."


Here's another great scene. One of Charlies Angels, male or female, has nothing on this woman.

Interesting thing I noticied, that I didn't catch before.
She leaves a 20 dollar bill for a meal that couldn't have cost $10 or $12 bucks. It's like a homage to the waitress for the crap she has to put up with every day.

Remember to tip your waitress.




This actually reminds me of something from my young and fabulous days.

I went into a diner during way non peak hours. Wanted to sit and have the blue plate special, a cuppa coffee, and read this book I was really into. The place was basically dead.

Waiting for my meal, I got so absorbed in the book, everything around me disappeared. But then it filtered through that some older guy (I was like 28, probably looked like I was 22. He had to be in his mid 60's), had apparantly been calling across the diner for me for quite some time "Hey Irish! HEY!......IRISH!"

I'm not Irish, probably why it first didn't get through to me. I had colored my hair auburn at the time, and have fair skin.

Anyway, when I became aware, I didn't even lift my head. Wasn't intimadated or anything. It was more like "WTF is it this guy think I'm supposed to do?" Like I'm supposed to get into this conversation with someone old enough to be my grandfather, whose opening line is "HEY! IRISH!" Wasn't even worth acknowledging.

He wasn't there much longer, but during the time it escalated to "Hey Irish! Think you're too good for me Irish?" and stuff like that. When he walked (finally) out the door, his parting shot was "******* Irish Bitch"

I guess I have to own my part in this. I mean, I was an unaccompanied woman reading a book and drinking coffee in a public restaurant. What did I expect. I was asking for it.

Thinking back, I would have loved to have had a badge on me. Gun wouldn't be necessary. Just the badge. Just pull it out and put it on the counter.

I'm having a hard time imagining that situation reversed. Me calling out to a random man eating a burger in a diner. "Hey baby. Hey!"
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 06:06 am
@chai2,
I've not yet watched that series but I've read a number of laudatory reviews. And my experience tells me that anything featuring Toni Collette will be worthwhile.

Your restaurant tale surprises me not at all. The more years I live, the less I like my own gender. There was an Israeli feminist I saw quoted when I was at university. Her position was that the plague visited upon the Egyptians where every first-born male child was killed would have also been valuable had it been visited on Jewish first-born sons as well. I can see her point.

I had a thought on watching your first clip above. The use of obscenity is purposeful. Not merely in that it is not just a manifestation of outrage but also in that it serves, I think, to portray female characters who are strong and confident enough to break behavioral taboos (speech taboos in this case) just as men commonly do.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 02:49 pm
@Sturgis,
I appreciate that this is a bit of a tongue-in-cheek post, but as has been pointed out (by someone..?) Charlie's Angels was a female version of numerous male series and movies.

If there is a moron out there who is seriously asking this question, then he (I assume the gender here) is just that...a moron. He is also most likely a rare moron even if he has a few hundred fellow morons bellowing the same shite on social media.

A Woke Charlie's Angels will certainly appeal to a fairly large (compared to the number of people in my family and social circle) number of viewers, but not enough for the producers to make any money. Another lefty film fiasco.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 02:58 pm
@Sturgis,
Sturgis wrote:


That got me to thinking and a-wondering, what about a version of Charlie's Angels where the angels are all male?


I wouldn't be against it - but wouldn't that almost be like having a "women's" version on Three Men and a Baby or Mrs. Doubtfire? Or something like that?

Isn't Charlie's Angels premise that it is unusual to have women in the role of private eyes? The idea of it was already that there are so many "male" roles so this was supposed to be the opposite of this.

So by making them male roles it would be like going back to the original.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 02:59 pm
@Real Music,
Real Music wrote:

Quote:
There was mention of how other rebooted movies over time have shifted to having more of a female lead. Mention was made of Ghostbusters along with a handful of other cinematic works.

Ghostbusters is the only movie I am aware of, that rebooted the male roles into female roles.

There may be other movies that have done this. I'm just not aware of any.

I did see the original Ghostbuster movies back in the 1980s.

I never had any desire to see the recent reboot.


Recently James Bond became a woman.
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 03:06 pm
@chai2,
Ha ha - this reminds me of me acting like a ninny. Not screaming and not over some stripper or musician. A good looking guy that worked in another group at my company - he was hot and I was what about 23. I bumped into him on a floor that was almost empty - he looked at me and did what any normal person would do when someone looked lost - he asked if he could help me find someone?

I opened my mouth and what come out was complete nonsense - I said something like blump blumb bloo - he laughed I put my head down and quickly walked away.

But I can feel better now at least I didn't cry scream or yell.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  2  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 03:09 pm
@Linkat,
We'll see how it does at the Box Office.

Most people go to the movies to escape their everyday lives and all the crap the Media is laying on them.

They don't go so they can be Woken

If it has the thrills and spills of prior Bond films it will do OK. (Charlize Theron starred in a spy-thriller, Atomic Blonde, that took place in East Germany during the cold war. I thought it was great. It had the noir spy stuff and a lot of uber-violence.)

If the female Bond film is heavy on Woke crap, it will fail...miserably.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 05:41 pm
@Sturgis,
Sturgis wrote:

Read an article today about the new and latest version of the by now predictable Charlie's Angels movies.

There was mention of how other rebooted movies over time have shifted to having more of a female lead. Mention was made of Ghostbusters along with a handful of other cinematic works.

That got me to thinking and a-wondering, what about a version of Charlie's Angels where the angels are all male?

It would also switch the Charlie character to being female. Voice only of course.

Isn't it about time that men got their chance I being crime fighting angels?

Kinda like the A-Team, but with more beefcake?
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 07:17 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:

I said something like blump blumb bloo


I too have uttered those words, under similar stressors. Embarrassed

Speaking of A Team and lookers, Dirk Benedict was certainly not hard to look at.

Here he is with his 70's pornstache.

https://www.picclickimg.com/d/l400/pict/382928381405_/Dirk-Benedict-ORIGINAL-8x10-press-photo-V4620.jpg
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 07:28 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:


Kinda like the A-Team, but with more beefcake?


Eww. No.

More lean please.
Idoxide
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 11:41 pm
Probably a mega biased opinion but I feel some women are more interested in movies like Aquaman and Magic Mike because of the amount of shirtless scenes you would actually see vs. men seducing women and creating another feminist comment about how these men lure women in just to crush them silly.

I'm going to just put this here. Keep your imagination open for a shirtless Channing Tatum and a shirtless Jason Momoa.
0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  2  
Reply Tue 19 Nov, 2019 09:04 am
@chai2,
I'm watching "Unbelievable" now. It's a very impressive work. I highly recommend it to everyone.
0 Replies
 
 

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