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The End of Evolution Indoctrination in Kansas

 
 
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 04:55 am
The evolutionist contingent on FreeRepublic is crying over this:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1422236/posts?page=77

[Kansas Education] Board member Morris: Evolution a 'fairy tale'
The Wichita Eagle ^ | 13 June 2005 | JOHN HANNA

http://www.freerepublic.com/%5Ehttp://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/news/state/11885987.htm

Evolution is an "age-old fairy tale," sometimes defended with "anti-God contempt and arrogance," according to a State Board of Education member involved in writing new science standards for Kansas' public schools.

A newsletter written by board member Connie Morris, of St. Francis, was circulating on Monday. In it, Morris criticized fellow board members, news organizations and scientists who defend evolution.

She called evolution "a theory in crisis" and headlined one section of her newsletter "The Evolutionists are in Panic Mode!"

"It is our goal to write the standards in such a way that clearly gives educators the right AND responsibility to present the criticism of Darwinism alongside the age-old fairy tale of evolution," Morris wrote.

Morris was one of three board members who last week endorsed proposed science standards designed to expose students to more criticism of evolution in the classroom. The other two were board Chairman Steve Abrams, of Arkansas City, and Kathy Martin, of Clay Center.

http://www.ksde.org/commiss/Kathy%20Martin_sm.jpg
http://www.ksde.org/commiss/morris.jpg

Morris was in Topeka for meetings at the state Department of Education's headquarters and wasn't available for interviews.

But her views weren't a surprise to Jack Krebs, vice president of Kansas Citizens for Science, an Oskaloosa educator.

"Her belief is in opposition to mainstream science," he said. "Mainstream science is a consensus view literally formed by tens of thousands people who literally studied these issues."

The entire board plans to review the three members' proposed standards Wednesday. The new standards - like the existing, evolution-friendly ones - determine how students in fourth, seventh and 10th grades are tested on science.

In 1999, the Kansas board deleted most references to evolution from the science standards. Elections the next year resulted in a less conservative board, which led to the current, evolution-friendly standards. Conservative Republicans recaptured the board's majority in 2004 elections.

The three board members had four days of hearings in May, during which witnesses criticized evolutionary theory that natural chemical processes may have created the first building blocks of life, that all life has descended from a common origin and that man and apes share a common ancestor. Evolution is attributed to 19th Century British scientist Charles Darwin.

Organizing the case against evolution were intelligent design advocates. Intelligent design says some features of the natural world are so complex and well-ordered that they are best explained by an intelligent cause.

In their proposed standards, the three board members said they took no position on intelligent design, but their work followed the suggestions of intelligent design advocates.

In her newsletter, Morris said she is a Christian who believes the account of creation in the Book of Genesis is literally true. She also acknowledged that many other Christians have no trouble reconciling faith and evolution.

"So be it," Morris wrote. "But the quandary exists when poor science - with anti-God contempt and arrogance - must insist that it has all the answers."

National and state science groups boycotted May's hearings before Morris and the other two board members, viewing them as rigged against evolution.

"They desperately need to withhold the fact that evolution is a theory in crisis and has been crumbling apart for years," Morris said.

But Krebs said Morris is repeating "standard creationist rhetoric."

"People have been saying evolution is a theory in crisis for 40 or 50 years," Krebs said. "Yet the scientific community has been strengthening evolution every year."
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 4,712 • Replies: 82
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 05:06 am
The End of Education in Kansas is a bit more apt.
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 05:09 am
The US really is a country going backwards.
0 Replies
 
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 06:31 am
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 06:34 am
Just as with Galileo and Copernicus, the Church can slow science down, but nothing is strong enough to stop its onward march.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 08:08 am
Michael Behe, one of Intelligent Designs ablest spokesmen said:

"For the record, I have no reason to doubt that the Universe is the billions of years old that physicists say it is.Further, I find the idea of common descent (that all organisms share a common ancestor) fairly convincing, and have no particular reason to doubt it"
-Darwins Black Box . p5.

I like the term evolution friendly. This of course would be as opposed to "Mythology friendly' which best describes the Creationist model.
0 Replies
 
coluber2001
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 09:32 am
Wilso wrote:
The US really is a country going backwards.


Tell me about it! It's called reactionaryism, a word so taboo that "radical right" is used instead.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 09:42 am
Wilso wrote:
The US really is a country going backwards.

This kind of ignorant resistance to science and technology is has been around forever, e.g. Copernicus, Galileo, the Luddites near Nottingham, the Scopes Monkey Trial, attempts to legislate that pi is exactly 3, etc.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 10:49 am
I know, I know, the sky is falling in.... The good news is that it's only the leftists' sky which is falling. Consider the words of Phillip Johnson:

"Darwin on Trial", page 144:

Quote:

"The Darwinists may have made a serious strategic error in choosing to pursue a campaign of indoctrination in the public schools. Previously, the high-school text books said relatively little about evolution, except that most scientists believe in it, which is hard to dispute. Serious examination of the scientific evidence was postponed until college, and was provided mostly to biology majors and graduate students. Most persons outside the profession had little opportunity to learn how much philosophy was being taught in the name of science, and if they knew what was going on, they had no opportunity to mount an effective challenge.

"The Darwinists themselves have changed that comfortable situation by demanding that the public schools teach a great deal more "about evolution". What they mean is that the public schools should try much harder to persuade students to believe in Darwinism, not that they should present fairly the evidence which is causing Darwinists so much trouble. What goes on in the public schools is the public's business, however, and even creationists are entitled to point out errors and evasions in the textbooks and teaching materials. Invokations of authority may work for awhile, but eventually determined protesters will persuade the public to grant them a fair hearing on the evidence. As many more people outside the fundamentalist camp learn how committed Darwinists are to opposing theism of any sort, and how little support Darwinism finds in the scientific evidence, the Darwinists may wish that they had never left their sanctuary."


The American people basically do not want their children being indoctrinated in left-wing pinko ideological doctrines which masqerade as scientific theories, particularly when those doctrines have patholotical social effects.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 10:50 am
Brandon say
Quote:
attempts to legislate that pi is exactly 3, etc.

tell me that was only a joke reported in THE ONION. ?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 10:56 am
gunga speak
Quote:
The American people basically do not want their children being indoctrinated in left-wing pinko ideological doctrines which masqerade as scientific theories, particularly when those doctrines have patholotical social effects.

Do you realize how silly you sound?
As a professed IDer, youve been mostly silent as to Behes ownrecognition of the truth to evolutionary theory.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 11:22 am
I only drop in here for an occasional giggle. Good work, Gunga Din.
0 Replies
 
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 12:09 pm
Gunge you said
Quote:
The American people basically do not want their children being indoctrinated in left-wing pinko ideological doctrines which masqerade as scientific theories, particularly when those doctrines have patholotical social effects.


Um Gunge, hate to pop your balloon, but Stalin tried state enforced Lamarckism. It was a mistake. Lamarck was a failed hypothesis and as a result Russia went from the breadbasket of Europe in the 20's to begging the US for wheat in the 70's.

That also sums up my fears about Kansas. With the widespread acceptance of the Not so Intelligent Design hypothesis as a fact of agriculture technology, Kansas may suffer the same fate as the former Soviet Union.

Rap
0 Replies
 
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 12:33 pm
Quote:
attempts to legislate that pi is exactly 3, etc.


Actually it would work out to pi being 4

Quote:
Bill No. 246, 1897. State of Indiana.

``Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana: It has been found that the circular area is to the quadrant of the circumference, as the area of an equilateral rectangle is to the square on one side.''

``In further proof of the value of the author's (E.J. Goodman, M.D.) proposed contribution to education, and offered as a gift to the State of Indiana, is the fact of his solutions of the trisection of the angle, duplication of the cube and quadrature of the circle having been already accepted as contributions to science by the American Mathematical Monthly, the leading exponent of mathematical thought in this country.''
The above is part of Bill No. 246, 1897, of the State of Indiana. It passed three readings in the Indiana House in 1897. (Introduced by the House Committee on Swamp Lands.)

It also passed first reading in the Indiana Senate, 1897. (Introduced by the Senate Committee on Temperance.)

The bill was viewed as having financial value:

``The case is perfectly simple. If we pass this bill which establishes a new and correct value of , the author offers our state without cost the use of this discovery and its free publication in our school textbooks, while everyone else must pay him a royalty.''

By chance Professor C.A. Waldo of Purdue was in the Senate for a reading of the bill. He convinced Senators that the bill was nonsense and it was tabled. (Presumably it is still tabled.)
Indiana's failure at Math

Rap
0 Replies
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 12:40 pm
I would really like to meet you gunga, I truly would.

What are the museum hours? Laughing
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 12:44 pm
Kansas is the laughing stock of the educational world. Their educators even shy away from attending national and international education conferences because of fear of ridicule.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 03:04 pm
farmerman wrote:
Brandon say
Quote:
attempts to legislate that pi is exactly 3, etc.

tell me that was only a joke reported in THE ONION. ?

'fraid not.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 03:08 pm
Brandon9000 wrote:
Just as with Galileo and Copernicus, the Church can slow science down, but nothing is strong enough to stop its onward march.


Is all this done by the Catholic church there?
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 03:16 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Brandon9000 wrote:
Just as with Galileo and Copernicus, the Church can slow science down, but nothing is strong enough to stop its onward march.


Is all this done by the Catholic church there?

It is probably done by extreme members of every religion, who feel that their myths trump empirically based scientific research. Often here that means Christianity.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 03:22 pm
Well, I've written about this a couple of times: my grandmother and my granmother webt to (private) grammar schools in the early< 20th century: their diplomas show that they got good marks in evolution theory - grandmother had been on a Catholic, nun-run school :wink:
0 Replies
 
 

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